Arizona State University Reviews | Glassdoor

Arizona State University Reviews

Updated March 31, 2017
40 reviews

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Arizona State University President Michael M. Crow
Michael M. Crow
22 Ratings

40 Employee Reviews

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Pros
Cons
  • Work / life balance was difficult (in 16 reviews)

  • Employees need to pay for parking (in 13 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Helpful (1)

    "Stay away from The Design School"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Tempe, AZ
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Tempe, AZ
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Arizona State University full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    health benefits are great, forced retirement is great when you retire if its still there

    Cons

    This isn't like working in Education. Schools are run like businesses, bad bosses, even those that are known as really bad, continue to have jobs.

    Advice to Management

    do what you said, and fire people who have no business working there. When many, many people complain, its not a personality conflict, its a problem.


  2. Helpful (1)

    "Gossip Support"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Technology Consultant in Phoenix, AZ
    Former Employee - Technology Consultant in Phoenix, AZ
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Arizona State University part-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    If you're going to school there, it's convenient to also work there to cut down on commuting

    Cons

    So much gossip going around due to how immature some of your colleagues are, they pay really poorly and don't give raises for good work, pay distribution is completely off- our manager made 6 figures and I was only earning $9 per hour. There was also no water in the office.

    Advice to Management

    Take a serious look at all the good talent that went away because of poor management, fire the downtown dean, and restructure classroom support


  3. "Cannot substantiate this educational benefit to our working public"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    Former Employee - Clinic/Law Professors Paralegal Assistant/Grant Writing Assistant in Phoenix, AZ
    Former Employee - Clinic/Law Professors Paralegal Assistant/Grant Writing Assistant in Phoenix, AZ
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Arizona State University full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    It would not benefit a future business owner to remain in this field any longer than necessary.

    Cons

    Staff was off legal grounds to even be a public figure

    Advice to Management

    None


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  5. Helpful (1)

    "Poor working environment for adjuncts"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Contractor - Adjunct in Tempe, AZ
    Current Contractor - Adjunct in Tempe, AZ
    Doesn't Recommend

    I have been working at Arizona State University as a contractor (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Advantages of a major research university with incredible diversity within a beautiful campus. Resources like the library, student facilities and push towards sustainability are positive to see.

    Cons

    Amazing university that places zero value on the adjunct faculty. Contract labor is paid less than a burger flipper, raises don't exist, not respected by full time faculty and yet relied on to keep appearances in front of students. More and more there are requests for additional workload outside of teaching and teaching itself includes design and determination of curriculum, coordination with other faculty and department. Instructors are held responsible to be prepared without being paid to prepare. Adjuncts pay for parking. Adjuncts pay for any training they need. Adjuncts learn as they go-facility technology has to be learned in the job. Expectations are high, returns outside of seeing students learn are low.

    Advice to Management

    It's a model of teaching that was created for short stints to relieve faculty taking sabbaticals. It has turned into the status quo creating a largely dysfunctional unethical environment that hides behind an implied sense of purpose. The real purpose is to make more money for the university administration. Pay your people. Provide and pay for ongoing training. Provide benefits. Acknowledge the effort is year-around. Provide free parking and facilitate yearly reviews of technology systems on campus.


  6. "McU"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - English Instructor in Tempe, AZ
    Current Employee - English Instructor in Tempe, AZ
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Great support staff in the Writing Programs office.

    Cons

    Teachers are not valued. 5/5 courseload. Ever-increasing course caps. Crow runs the university like a corporation, not as a place of learning.

    Advice to Management

    Value teaching and learning!


  7. "University and RA facility review"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Graduate Research Assistant in Tempe, AZ
    Former Employee - Graduate Research Assistant in Tempe, AZ

    I worked at Arizona State University (More than a year)

    Pros

    The university have good faculty and good reserach facility. The working hour was flexible and the pressure was moderate.

    Cons

    Too many students. The competition is sometimes unfair. The classes are over populated and have less lab facility than it requires

    Advice to Management

    Assign more TA to courses. EE department felt like neglected compared to many other neighbouring departments.


  8. "Depends on the department..."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Tempe, AZ
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Tempe, AZ
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Arizona State University full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Pros at ASU include greate benefits, tuition waiver, and a handful of holidays off. Other than these, it's a difficult environment and commuting to/from campus is a big challenge unless it's summer.

    Cons

    Very poor managements, no support for employees/subordinates both professionally or when needing backup or assistance with a non-routine task. It's very possible that there are good departments and schools to work in, but there are also very bad, toxic ones. This is only my opinion from where I worked. Another BIG con is the pay. The benefits are why you work at ASU, not the pay check.

    Advice to Management

    Please, please let your employees know that they're doing a good job and thank them occasionally. This does more than you think and it's a simple thing to do. It motivates them and we want to work harder for you instead of being scolded publicly via email. A little appreciation and guidance goes a long way!


  9. "Listen to your Instincts"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Program Coordinator in Tempe, AZ
    Former Employee - Program Coordinator in Tempe, AZ
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Arizona State University full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    -Opportunity to create programs and meet great people
    -Lots of opportunity to be social
    -Great pension plan if you stay for at least 10 years
    -Opportunity to mentor students
    -Flexible working hours
    -Fitness center is free to use for employees

    Cons

    -Programs must match other campuses (Limits creativity)
    -Frequent changes
    -Quantity is more important than quality
    -Managing student employees can be very difficult
    -Student employees can be flaky
    -Hiring responsible employees is challenging
    -Work hours vary
    -Not paid for overtime
    -Frequently on-call
    -Work weekdays and weekends
    -Employees must pay for parking and be put on a wait list to get preferred parking
    -No raises or bonuses...ever

    Advice to Management

    Slow down and make time for your employees. High turnover in a position says something about the position itself. Take a deeper look and get feedback from each employee on how to make their jobs more enjoyable so they can excel.


  10. Helpful (1)

    "Contract Faculty in English Dept."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Instructor in Tempe, AZ
    Current Employee - Instructor in Tempe, AZ
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Arizona State University full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    If you love to teach, you have a widely diverse student body that comes from many different countries and cultural backgrounds.

    Cons

    -Work here only if you love to teach.
    -English Dept. and Writing Programs management is seriously corrupt. The system for promotions and/or hiring/firing teachers lacks transparency and rationale.
    -Communication with contract faculty is bankrupt.
    -Recent changes in teaching load requirements force contract faculty to work more with less pay (and less respect)
    -The program is run with a corporate mentality by bean counters.

    Advice to Management

    Get rid of all management in both Writing Programs and English Dept. Start again with managers who understand that teachers are human beings with feelings.


  11. Helpful (3)

    "English Department underpays employees"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - University Writing Programs Instructor in Tempe, AZ
    Current Employee - University Writing Programs Instructor in Tempe, AZ
    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Arizona State University full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    Good direct supervisor. She cares about employees and is fighting to make things better for the department. The Program Manager is really great. She is incredibly kind and hard-working.

    Cons

    We've always been paid horribly for the amount of work that we do. But I enjoyed my students and my department and I felt as if I was making a difference in the world. Last year, after close to a decade of working at ASU, and receiving high marks on both my teaching evaluations and on my annual instructor evaluations, I finally received a merit pay increase. This merit pay increase was .5% of my annual salary. However, THIS year, we are being asked to teach two more classes per year and, while the salaries are being "bumped up" to $36K (for a 5/5 teaching load of 25 students per class), the merit pay has "vanished" from the equation and some of us are actually being paid LESS for this teaching load than we were previously.

    I've always been more than willing and able to find time to help students in my off hours, to counsel them about how to navigate the increasingly-large university, to urge them to continue on with their dream of completing their education. Given this new teaching load and the fact that, in order to make up for that missing salary, I will be forced to teach somewhere else in addition to teaching at ASU, I won't be able to hold as many hands. And no matter what people think, beginning college students are practically children. They need extra help and encouragement to find their path. First-generation college students are even-more so, and, increasingly, this is ASU's college population. They need MORE help, not LESS. In addition, tuition keeps increasing. This raises the question. Where is the money going?

    It's clear now that ASU does not truly value students, or student retention, simply the number of students rolling in the doors and their tuition dollars. Even if those students don't manage to complete their degrees, in part because classes have become so big that they cannot get any personal attention, ASU still gets the student-loan funds.

    ASU is the Walmart of education. If you can avoid teaching here, do so at all costs. You won't make enough to pay your bills, or your own student loans, and you won't be able to help students as effectively as you would elsewhere.

    Advice to Management

    "ASU, You need to rethink the decision to increase your instructors' teaching loads without paying them a living wage. If you are, as President Crow says, focused on "creating [a] culture for success," and believe that Arizona State "needs to do do even more coaching and advising than it already does," increasing course loads on the very people who have been able (by dint of class size, largely) to create the kinds of intimate connections that help "unwieldy public universities . . . provide better service for large numbers of non elite students" is a mistake that will reveal itself quickly (Ripley 66).

    President Crow, if you truly "disdain the elitism and status consciousness of other college presidents" and you are invested in taking care of "this college-completion thing," you'll stand behind your Writing Programs instructors. We are your foot soldiers. By not supporting us and by not paying us a living wage, while asking us to teach/coach/advise an increasing number of "nonelite students," you are shooting yourself in the foot and all-but asking for the retention rates to plummet. It's all well and good to "embrace online learning as a central element of [your] entire mission," but not while you're treating the in-person learning component as "a shiny accessory" (Ripley 66).

    You are also making it clear that the way out of the lower-class is not a college degree. Many of us have two or three graduate degrees and make less money teaching your students than do Starbucks' Managers. We do it for the same reasons that you claim to be doing your job: "to show that the world can be saved" (Ripley 63). Why should we be punished for sharing your dream?

    How can we honestly encourage our students to continue paying an increased tuition load and go into debt, when we're not even sure that they'll be better off if they do complete college? Put paid to the fact that many of your ASU instructors are on food-stamps and working at two or three other places in addition to ASU just to survive.

    President Crow, be the visionary that you claim to be. Stand with us. Pay us a living wage so that we can afford to stay at ASU and continue to "prioritize the needs of real-life students over the traditions of academia" (Ripley 63)."


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