Austin Energy "pension" Reviews | Glassdoor

Austin Energy Employee Reviews about "pension"

Updated Jun 16, 2019

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3.3
59%
Recommend to a Friend
67%
Approve of CEO
Austin Energy General Manager Larry Weis (no image)
Larry Weis
28 Ratings
Pros
  • "Work life balance is manageable while still making an impact(in 11 reviews)

  • "(in 5 reviews)

Cons
  • "Pigeon Project Management Methodology by upper management(in 6 reviews)

  • "Pension plan b is much worse than plan a(in 4 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

Reviews about "pension"

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  1. "ok"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook

    I have been working at Austin Energy full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    Pension plan a is pretty good except it has to wait till at least 20 years to vest

    Cons

    Pension plan b is much worse than plan a

    Austin Energy2019-06-17
  2. Helpful (3)

    "Don't let the benefits fool you...you won't go anywhere here most likely"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Austin Energy full-time for more than 8 years

    Pros

    Work life balance Benefits (though these are definitely not great-insurance will cover for gender reassignment but won't cover treatment for some run-of-the-mill issues...very upsetting)

    Cons

    Where to begin... -Lack of opportunities to grow professionally (they have a good pension plan but who can stay to benefit from this in the same job and not be promoted or challenged which lots of folks have already said on GlassDoor...so many jobs go to outside hires who don't seem to get the culture and the responsibility of being a public servant) -Overall the management team from bottom to top is very weak and offer little vision, support or guidance for staff. Some managers actually get in the way of you getting your job done...they don't communicate well with staff, they don't protect their people from other department managers trying to dictate their work loads and flows, they support ridiculously long, drawn out approval processes that are totally unnecessary) -Lot of unethical behavior - shady hiring practices, human resources doesn't take ethical complaints seriously, overt favoritism of certain employees ( Austin Energy being a government entity using ratepayer money, managers should treat all direct reports as fairly and equally as possible), kingdom building by upper management that gets the manager a higher paid position thought that person usually doesn't want to do the work and more and more responsibility to the employees -Employees are asked to be whistle blowers and report unethical behavior but when you do they just brush you off and don't look in to the things managers are doing that waste ratepayer money and lower employee morale. S

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    Austin Energy2017-09-27
  3. Helpful (1)

    "A place where dreams go to die"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Austin, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Austin Energy full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Pension. Work life balance. Employees don't get fired. Rolling time off.

    Cons

    Low salaries. There is no reward for recognition. (Across the board 2-3% inflation increases some years, but that's it.) So many bad managers. Corrupt HR. Hard to move vertically or horizontally. Once you work a few years, you've invested time into a pension system. You feel you have to work decades to cash in on retirement. Not a lot of mobility or opportunity so lots of employees feel stuck. Don't imagine you will come in as a temp and be hired as a full-time employee. AE doesn't create job openings. Not good diversity in age (skews old).

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    Austin Energy2016-02-02
  4. Helpful (3)

    "Only game in town and they know it"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - IT Drone in Austin, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Austin Energy full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    A very small paycheck Termination is near impossible, so you can sit in your chair all day and produce nothing but words. The high ratings that HR has posted on Glassdoor about work/life balance is true, because watching the clock and leaving at five is the norm as are very long lunches. Perfect place to run out the clock on your career or if retired, but want a few extra bucks without having to produce. You get to meet the stereotypical union and government worker. Union is optional, but strongly encouraged. On the flip side, you'll get angry every time you open your Austin Energy bill. You are paying for you to sit and not perform. You will get raises no matter what your performance rating is. Lazy people are paid the same and rewarded the same as those that produce, so why produce. No internet surfing allowed, so bring your iPad, phone or a book, eight hours here is a long day.

    Cons

    The majority of IT managers work daily to undermine the CIO as wells as their peers and next level managers. It is common place to hear your manager bash their management, but not to worry, they also bash your peers and by extension, you are being bashed to your peers. Then you have the ever so over worked PMPs that have on average one project each with a BSA for bringing in vendor apps or upgrades; yep, tough stuff making sure the infrastructure is in place, but overlooking basics like runbooks, alerts, etc. When you need to meet with PMs or BSAs they are, 'busy, very, very busy'. Change management here is very easy, all paper based, no online system and very light. Those that hate that process will love this one. There is very little skin in the game within IT because most of the people are contractors. Then you have the employees that are not engaged, because they don't have to be. It is made clear that termination is near impossible, especially if you joined the union. So, for the most part, employees are running out the clock. It's actually laughable to hear how stressed they are, two weeks in and you'll find that the stress is simply showing up. Nothing of importance is developed here, you are merely the infrastructure by which external companies install, manage and run their apps. This company is a "success" because there is no competition. Automation, Security, etc. is like being in the '90s, the only cutting edge technologies come from vendors. They are such visionaries that they're still on paper and manager signed timesheets and your employment can only happen at the start of a pay-period because of their payroll system; that should have been the red flag. There seems to be very little appetite to hold vendor’s feet to the fire when there’s been a failure. I’m accustomed to the incident or problem managers taking this over, but it seems to be non-existent here which can be a good or bad thing depending on your style. Personally, I’d rather not have repeat issues if it can permanently fixed. You hear about ITIL/ITSM, but you don't see it. Make no mistake, there are some good people here, but they've stayed to long in hopes of change and now they're at that point where too much time has been put in, they'll lose the time/pension, etc. I get it, which is why I started my job search after my first month. The interview process was so full of promise, so much conversation and very engaging, they know all of the right words to say, but when you start you find out immediately that it was a lie. Again, theory. Any IT professional worth their salt will avoid AE at all costs or use it as a temp check until a real job opens up in a real IT shop. This place is not innovative, productive and the only accomplishments are; • Managers who produce reams of useless word docs that have no meat and are never used • Managers who put down their team members to other team members • Managers who sit a spew theory, but when challenged on production, seek to undermine • Peers who advise you to do nothing, "because we make the money for the city so they leave us alone." (this is said by almost everyone and openly in the halls.) Preparing to leave here is thrilling. It's important to note though that having this position on my resume created hurdles when dealing with private companies, so be prepared for that. I finally removed it from my resume and the calls started. Now for the much reviled CIO who you will hear about from the day you start. Basically he is evil because he is making changes the only way he can, through reorgs, because, again, you cannot terminate for failure to perform. In return you have long term bench sitters who are angry and digging in their heels to prevent any effort that might result in them having to produce. It's a shame that his talents are lost on the truly lazy and poisonous management team that smiles and nods in his meetings, then informs the teams to "ignore him, he'll be gone soon enough". Take any position, but this one; you won't be sorry that you passed this up.

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    Austin Energy2014-03-21

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