BJ Services Field Engineer Reviews | Glassdoor

BJ Services Field Engineer Reviews

Updated June 12, 2018
4 reviews

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Field Engineer

3.0
StarStarStarStarStar
Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
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Warren Zemlak
0 Ratings

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Pros
Cons
  • "Long hours, no clear vision, poor execution on management's half" (in 5 reviews)

  • "Work/Life balance; co-workers in office are out of touch with those in the field" (in 3 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "Deal With The Devil"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Field Engineer
    Former Employee - Field Engineer
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at BJ Services full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    You're here for the pay, that's it. Training used to be top notch, though it's tapered off.

    Cons

    You're here for oilfield service work. Make no mistake about it - operator, engineer or manager, everyone is disposable. Long hours, no work-life balance, treated like the bottom of a work boot from management to customer. That's what you're signing up for.

    Advice to Management

    Hire and retain talent rather than buddy-buddy. The current regime of the deaf leading the blind won't bode well.


  2. "Limited Growth In the Pipeline Services Division (Engineering) in Houston"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Field Engineer in Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Field Engineer in Houston, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at BJ Services full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    If your fresh to oil and Gas this is a place to gain massive hands on experience in 2-3 years. This company will take you all over the world so you understand how to Commission Various Pipeline Applications

    Cons

    1. Below Market Rate Salary
    2. Lack of Work Life Balance
    3. Managers lack Decision Making ability or refuse to use it ( Go along to get along)
    4. Lack of integrity is condoned amongst managers
    5. Hostile work Environment is accepted

    Advice to Management

    1. Take care of your employees
    2. Make a decision and stand by your decision especially if it impacts employee benifits
    3. Ensure your first level managers have a track record of being ethical
    4. Do not allow managers it stir conflict amongst employees.

  3. "Decent start...only work hourly"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Field Engineer
    Current Employee - Field Engineer
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    benefits package, training, relocation package, partial tuition pay

    Cons

    100+hrs, unorganized programs, never receiving promised benefits

    Advice to Management

    be respectful of employees both above and below


  4. "Great place to begin career...."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Field Engineer
    Former Employee - Field Engineer
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Intensive training program brings new hire engineers into the fold immediately. State of the art training facility in Tomball where engineers take technical classes on products and services that the company offers. They shaved off any hiring fat during the technical courses which shows they are serious about having technically proficient employees and are not afraid to cut their losses.

    With the right attitude, an employee will be able to get out of the company the effort he puts into his job. I was able to become proficient in multiple service lines which has been a launching point for my career beyond BJ. The beginning salary and benefits are much better than most offers for engineering grads (non-petroleum).

    The company is well respected and I never felt that knowledge was a secret. The technology the company had allowed me to experience cutting edge applications and operations in the field.

    Cons

    You will become stagnant in the position you are in. Your success and career advancement are not always based on your accomplishments or technical capacity. On the same hand that you will get out of what you put into the job, when you go the extra mile and make family sacrifices for the benefit of the company, you are not always rewarded or even recognized. Once you are successful in a position that is hard to fill if you are promoted, management severely limits your promotion opportunities.

    Management was quick to cut the job bonuses for engineers which is what made the job worth the time you invested into it. The job bonus program was a joke and its basis is ethically questionable. Engineers are able to self report job bonuses based on their own performance and I found that some of my peers did not have the same integrity that I did. It was completely frustrating.

    Advice to Management

    I understand that tough times call for unpopular decisions. I watched many hard working, good people laid off with seemingly no remorse. In a large corporation, golden parachutes and corporate survival by sticking it to the little man will continue as long as capitalism. None of that angered me about the company at all.

    What pisses me off and drove me away from the company was the disconnect management had from the widget producing employee. When I am working 100+ hours a week in the most profitable district in the company and there are engineers sitting on their ass working 35 hours a week making the same amount I am while their district hemorrhages money, something is wrong.

    The company needs to learn to grow and foster their best talent. They also need to learn to compensate their employees based on their production. You do not have to rope all engineers into one category or wage scale. Recognize who is producing the most and compensate them accordingly.