BJSS Reviews | Glassdoor

BJSS Reviews

Updated May 20, 2018
62 reviews

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3.6
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BJSS Managing Director Glynn Robinson
Glynn Robinson
26 Ratings

62 Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • You will get to work on interesting projects for big clients (in 7 reviews)

  • They also organize frequent social events, which are always good fun (in 6 reviews)

Cons
  • Work/life balance also depends on the client, project, and project life-cycle stage (in 4 reviews)

  • Long work hours if you're on client site, often with nightmarish commutes (in 5 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Featured Review

    Helpful (9)

    "Excellent company, talented staff, interesting work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Technical Consultant in Manchester, England (UK)
    Former Employee - Senior Technical Consultant in Manchester, England (UK)
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at BJSS full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Talented employees, great industry reputation. Interesting projects. Small company feel in an ever growing successful company. Company cares about their employees. Above average pay.

    Cons

    Not much autonomy around what projects you can work on (for most employees) but this is pretty standard. Some projects are demanding and extra hours are expected, again pretty standard!


  2. "Awesome place to work!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at BJSS full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Great office culture. The people here are great to work with and always willing to help out whenever you need it. BJSS also covers certification expenses. You learn a unique number of technologies based on the client you work for. Company lunches/outings are always fun. Very lenient/flexible starting hours!

    Cons

    Every now and then you are placed on the bench without working on a project so it gets boring during those times.

  3. Helpful (2)

    "Abuses employees"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at BJSS full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    I had a good direct boss who served as a mentor.

    Cons

    Expected to work overtime, overtime mon-thurs did not mean you could work less friday, no working from home, often didn't have work for me, but when they did they overworked me and the client who we directly worked with literally yelled at us on a daily basis, and sick days were discouraged (was once yelled at for taking a sick day). I also got harassed and when I reported it, HR told me that women just get that and should accept it.

    Advice to Management

    Overtime should not be the norm. Allow working from home. Allow sick days. Treat your employees like people. Get a new and better HR which respects women.

    BJSS Response

    Mar 13, 2018 – BJSS

    Thank you for your feedback. I’m truly sorry that you didn’t enjoy your time at BJSS. I’m also sorry that it’s taken a few days for me to respond, but the points you’ve raised are serious, and I... More


  4. Helpful (5)

    "Great idea - terrible execution in the US"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    great resume building experience with some great clients

    Cons

    The leadership trinity in NYC cannot sell, scope or deliver their way out of a wet paper bag. When they fail to deliver - and they frequently do, they blame their subordinates. Not one competent person in the mix and the UK leadership trusts their poor judgment to a fault.

    Advice to Management

    Fire the NYC leadership

    BJSS Response

    May 26, 2017 – BJSS

    Thank you for your feedback and I am sorry your time at BJSS was not as you’d have hoped. Our US office has grown each year and is a profitable business with a great reputation with its clients . We... More


  5. "Automation Tester"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at BJSS full-time

    Pros

    Learn a lot of technologies

    Cons

    Fast Paced (only a con if you can't handle it)


  6. "Good company with excellent talented individuals"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Platform Engineer in Manchester, England (UK)
    Former Employee - Platform Engineer in Manchester, England (UK)
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at BJSS (More than a year)

    Pros

    Great people and knowledge. This company has some great projects and people and if you work hard and have the right attitude you'll learn lots and be involved with loads of great Tech.

    Cons

    Delivery focused and driven, if you don't like that then prob not the best place for you. If you do you'll thrive.

    Advice to Management

    Keep thinking about the people and investing in them.


  7. "Very good place to work if you want to be a consultant"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Business Analyst in London, England (UK)
    Current Employee - Business Analyst in London, England (UK)

    I have been working at BJSS full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    The Company is growing exponentially and there are many opportunities to grow. Also there is a great collaboration with SPARCK, the design agency within BJSS.

    Cons

    Being BJSS a consultancy, the work you do depends on the client and if the work is boring or not exciting and the engagement is long that means you can be bored for a long time.

  8. "Manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Glasgow, Scotland (UK)
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Glasgow, Scotland (UK)
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at BJSS full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    BJSS is an entrepreneurial organisation which is down-to-earth, forward-thinking and non-hierarchical. I have found everyone from board members down to be personable, welcoming and helpful.
    I have been able to action some changes in my short time here that would take much longer in a big corporate.
    I have not been pigeon-holed, so have seen my role diversify from what it would be elsewhere allowing me to have a real impact on the growth and shape of this new part of BJSS in Scotland.

    Cons

    BJSS employed 350 people up until 5 years ago and has seen some astronomical growth since then, now employing over 1,000 people. This does come with some growing pains, however, the leadership are very aware of this and are taking steps to address. They do seem genuinely focussed on being a great employer whilst maintaining their culture.

    Advice to Management

    Keep it going. It is rare to work for a company that values culture, ethics and above all else it's people. Keep listening to your teams as you are already and you will evolve even further as an employer and organisation.


  9. "Good People and Great"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Business Analyst in London, England (UK)
    Current Employee - Business Analyst in London, England (UK)
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at BJSS full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Highly supportive workplace, nice people, and a depth of experience. I see continuous efforts to always be improving things, whether it is project methods, social interactions, recruiting strategy, client engagements, or investing in people. Remuneration was higher than other offers I received from similar companies. Salary was not the reason I took the role, however, as the culture and way of working was a huge part of that decision and has paid off quite well. Compared with the huge companies I have worked for in the past, BJSS is a breath of fresh air, and probably the most open and accepting environment I have worked in with the least red tape and politics. What's more, the diversity of projects I get to work on is doing wonders for my career development and personal satisfaction. Also, Kitchen stocked full of free food +1

    Cons

    If you're not open to the possibility that your project might require you to travel, the, BJSS is probably not for you. Having said that, the occasional travel has been pretty fun for me.

    Advice to Management

    Keep impressing me :)


  10. Helpful (10)

    "The company that takes a lot and gives little back"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in London, England (UK)
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in London, England (UK)
    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at BJSS full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    - On balance, the quality of people is really good. They are talented, interested in technology, friendly.
    - The company does a lot of social perks, such as summer weekend away for employees and partners and children, Christmas party for employees and partners, new starter lunches, celebrations at the office, etc.
    - Fully stocked kitchen with variety of tea, nice coffee, chocolates, snacks, fizzy drinks, and alcoholic drinks and nibbles on Fridays.
    - Some of the projects are quite interesting and use a good amount of new technology.
    - There is room for cross-movement within the company, so people can change capabilities.
    - If you study for certain certifications, the company will pay for your exam. If you study on your own time (not on the bench), you also get a little bonus payment for passing the exam.

    Cons

    The obvious cons first:

    - It is difficult to switch projects. I have heard numerous people say over the course of the past few years that they weren't able to change assignments, even though the current ones interfered with their family lives.
    - There is no career path or any kind of structure. There are capability leads and the upper management, that's that.
    - It's not about what you know, but who you know. There are definite cliques of people, and, if you're not in it, it's pretty hopeless. There are people who are the golden children, and every transgression of theirs is forgiven.
    - It largely feels like a body shop these days (London is, anyway), and we are all just replaceable resources. There is little focus on building cohesive teams.
    - Availability expectations are pretty high: people check and respond to mail out of hours, often get called when they're away, need to change their plans and reschedule pre-existing personal engagements to accommodate clients on short notice, etc.
    - A lot of people seem to be leaving the company.
    - Salary increases are rare unless you keep on about it (and even then it's not guaranteed), and that's a tad awkward for everyone involved.
    - Everyone is billable all the time, so good luck trying to get your line manager to find the time to talk to you or meet with you.
    - Compared with friends in other IT consultancies or perm jobs, private healthcare cost is somewhat high, and pension matching is rather low, and there is no dental insurance (which used to be the norm, but it's a perk a lot of companies are adding now).

    Now the not-so-obvious cons:

    It's been pretty well established that, when a company treats its employees, customers, etc. like they were family or friends, the employees will work harder and for less money, the customers will be more loyal even when it's not the cheapest option, and so on. So for a few years now, the company has been actively trying to position the corporate culture as operating on social norms.

    In line with that, the corporate tagline has been that we're in it together, the most important thing to the company is its people, you accommodate us a little, and we'll accommodate you a lot. It's the kind of thing that builds loyalty and makes for employees who are happy and are perfectly willing to go the extra mile (or 10) for the company because it's a relationship built on social/personal exchange, not a market one.

    So what's so bad about that? Either BJSS management don't understand the nature and risks of a social relationship or they don't care. It's all well and good when the company needs its good little solders to stick it out at a difficult client a little longer, to commute a little farther, to put up with a stressful project, to work a few weekends with no overtime pay, to move a holiday by a few days. But what happens when the employees need assistance from the company or the management when there is a problem with a colleague or a client? Absolutely nothing. The managers are perpetually too busy to deal with people's complaints and escalations. And it's not an isolated experience I've had, it's tens upon tens upon tens of conversations had and overheard in the London office and every client site I've been on.

    If the employer-employee relationship was based on market norms to begin with, we wouldn't have false expectations. We would do the job as described, get paid, and call it a day because business is business. What happens instead, is we get sold a social relationship where we think we're going to be looked after if we're ever in need and then get stabbed in the back when we're brushed off instead of being offered assistance.

    (I am sure there are individuals who take care of issues brought to their attention, but they would be extremely few and far between.)

    Advice to Management

    It doesn't matter how many social "friendship tokens" you provide, how many free beers or parties. The first time you break the social exchange for any employee, he or she will see it for what it is, a market exchange. And that's when you stop getting dedication, joy, extracurriculars, etc. out of that person. You absolutely cannot have it both ways. You cannot tell us we're family and then turn around and leave us high and dry with our problems when it's more convenient or profitable for you to do so. If you truly want a social relationship, you have to maintain it on your part no matter what. Else, if you want to be impersonal and have us fend for ourselves when we have problems, stop wasting our time making us think you'll be there for us. Stop giving people false expectations of the company culture and and admit that you're really using the market rules to play. Tell us what you give and what you expect back, and we'll do the contractual minimum for you without expecting any sympathy or understanding in return.

    What you're doing now is taking passionate, hard-working, flexible, motivated employees (and all the good will you've created) and infuriating them by not helping them deal with an aggressive coworker, arrange leave, change clients, work remotely or whatever other problem they might be having (all real examples by the way, all shared by London colleagues).

    You want to know why people are leaving? That's why. People feel disillusioned and angry, they complain to their colleagues of being ignored by the management, and then leave. And because it's an uncomfortable topic, they just say in their exit interview that they wanted more money or easier travel. And it's a crying shame, because over the last year you have lost a great deal of good people in London who have been with the company for a relatively long time.

    I've met Glynn, and he's a nice chap. He might be genuinely striving for a great community at work, but it's all being lost in translation, and what we see on the ground is the complete lack of interest by the immediate management to keep the employees happy.


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