Bank of America Consultant Analyst Reviews | Glassdoor

Bank of America Consultant Analyst Reviews

7 reviews

Filter

Filter

Consultant Analyst

3.7
StarStarStarStarStar
Rating TrendsRating Trends
Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
Bank of America President & CEO Brian T. Moynihan
Brian T. Moynihan
2 Ratings

Employee Reviews

Sort: PopularRatingDate

Pros
Cons
  • "Hard to maintain a good work life balance" (in 532 reviews)

  • "Don't get a lot of support from upper management" (in 461 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "Sr. Engineer\ Analyst\ Architect- Consultant"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Contractor - Senior Engineer\Analyst\Architect- Consultant in New York, NY
    Current Contractor - Senior Engineer\Analyst\Architect- Consultant in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Bank of America as a contractor (More than a year)

    Pros

    Brilliant Teams lead by very sharp managerds

    Cons

    heavy work load and late night

    Advice to Management

    Keep up the good work


  2. "BOA"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Contractor - Senior Business Analyst (Consultant) in Freehold, NJ
    Former Contractor - Senior Business Analyst (Consultant) in Freehold, NJ

    I worked at Bank of America as a contractor (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Employees are friendly and always willing to provide information related to project contracts are working on.

    Cons

    Too many meetings and not always enough during the day to get things done which results in working evenings and weekends.

    Advice to Management

    None

  3. "Senior Systems Engineer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - V P Senior Consulting Analyst in Mandeville, LA
    Former Employee - V P Senior Consulting Analyst in Mandeville, LA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Bank of America (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Salary and bonus are good

    Cons

    British management is destroying the company from the inside.

    Advice to Management

    Dump the Brits


  4. "License Analyst"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Licensing Analyst (SAM)/Consultant in McHenry, IL
    Former Employee - Licensing Analyst (SAM)/Consultant in McHenry, IL
    Positive Outlook

    I worked at Bank of America (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Good oppotunties, consultants are always there to assist

    Cons

    Consistently restarting projects or cancelling projects


  5. "Quantitative Business Analyst"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Contractor - Quantitative Business Analyst/Consultant in New York, NY
    Current Contractor - Quantitative Business Analyst/Consultant in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Bank of America as a contractor (Less than a year)

    Pros

    The salary is good compared with other company, and the office environment is pretty casual.

    Cons

    The work flow is pretty slow. Even for a small task, it will require a bunch of team to get involved. But I think this is common for big companies.

    Advice to Management

    Overall it's good, but sometimes the bank should increase the efficiency.


  6. "Quality Assurance Analyst"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Quality Assurance Analyst/UAT Tester Consultant in Charlotte, NC
    Former Employee - Quality Assurance Analyst/UAT Tester Consultant in Charlotte, NC

    I worked at Bank of America (Less than a year)

    Pros

    It was a great opportunity to learn about the credit card industry

    Cons

    The management team left a lot to be desired


  7. Helpful (1)

    "Overall unhappy and distressful job"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - IT Consultant & Analyst
    Former Employee - IT Consultant & Analyst
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Bank of America (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    Pros unmitigated by cons: Great benefits, good salary, tuition reimbursements, life-balance programs, family assistance (such as elder care and adoptions)

    Pros mitigated by cons:
    WORK FROM HOME - Big push now is to remove the work from home program so new hires are mostly going to be working in an office and current employees are being pushed out of the program. Since many of the teams in IT are virtual, it's moderately pointless since the benefits of working in an office mean promotional opportunities (more about that later) and having greater access to your team and the people you support. But if they're all in another state or country, than mostly what you get out of the deal is a commute and increased noise levels when you're trying to function. As a new hire, you're not going to be working from home.

    My direct managers were amazing people whom I admired, but to be honest, if I'd had anyone else I wouldn't have stayed 5 more years.

    There's are several methods for educating employees, including the eLearning program and mentoring programs, but taking the time to invest in them isn't easy, even when it's mandated that you take them.

    Cons

    Poor PR for the company: I was mortally afraid to tell people I worked for BOA because then I'd be treated poorly by them. I know one employee who experienced delayed emergency medical treatment once admitting nurses found out who he worked for. When people found out, it was impossible to escape their wrath and stories of mistreatment. BOA MUST turn that ship around, if only to make it safe to admit our employer. I spent most my waking hours with you, so denying it is horrible!

    Toxic reverse takeover culture: After the Merryl Lynch purchase, the company culture went south. Layoffs concentrated on people from BOA as the reverse takeover turned the company toxic. It no longer was relatively safe to make a mistake, getting thrown under the bus and the likelihood of getting written up skyrocketed. I'm not a cavalier employee by nature; I've always been studious and exacting in everything I did. Despite being IT, I am not of the cowyboy coder mentality, but when overly cautious types like me are negatively impacted, it's a sign. This cultural change was reflected in calls to HR too, as quality HR representation became much less friendly and helpful. I seriously wonder how long it's going to be before someone takes a hard look at the ratio of people being laid off who were from BOA prior merger or Merryl Lynch prior merger, because I expect it's going to result in a significant law suit.

    Little opportunity for growth: Senior management flattened the hierarchy without investing in a culture that was comfortable for it. The number of people competing for jobs effectively increased by a factor of 10! Lots of people were demoted at that point, lost their titles, and were demoralized, and the people below vying to grow were demoralized by virtue of there being much fewer positions to grow into.

    Frequent, unpredictable layoffs: self-explanatory, but it used to be a seasonal thing, now it's an all the time thing. We used to call it the slaughter. Also, during one slaughtering season I witnessed while I still worked in the office, I was enraged to see some of the managers giving word to the dismissed were having a good time and cracking jokes. Maybe it's gallows humor because they were trying to manage the distress of having to do it, but treat the occasion with the solemnity it deserves, since the survivors can SEE you and remember.

    Advice to Management

    Leadership should be encouraged from the ground up at all levels. I know you're trying, and I saw some improvements before I left. However, there's two factors against job growth and promotion and leadership that MUST be addressed. First, flattening the hierarchy means that there is no where to go, and the frequent, unpredictable layoffs completely dissuaded me from even considering changing my teams because the newest addition to each team was the most likely to be whacked. Since layoffs often focused on the tier above me (Band 4) job growth is further out of reach because promoting up OR sideways was asking for a layoff. Second, if you want us to take risks, do something about the toxic people from Merryl Lynch. If you want people to experiment and try to assist you in innovative processes, don't write them up for simple mistakes. I know that in IT there are risks to making them, but if punitive measures are the first resort, then few will feel safe in helping you innovate.

    Speaking as someone who performed IT functions both from the office and from home, I can say with certainty that the move to bring everyone back to the office is not a great idea. Being home helped avoid most of the toxicity that the high stress in the office generated. And the stress in IT is HIGH, most of us within a few years were on stress-related medications, going gray much quicker than anticipated, and stress-induced heart attacks even happened at work. There are some workers who are stuck on the phone so much that they can't go to the bathroom for 12 hour stretches, which led to medical complications. Simply being at home increases the proximity of a toilet. There were more medical and emotional problems than this, and I really question the investment in work-life balance at that point. Since most of us were working in virtual teams anyway with our teammates on opposite sides of the country, there was little value in bringing us back. I can say that most of the office experience was more difficulty running conference calls since the noise level shot up, and watching people mess around in the office doing anything BUT work was both galling and distracting. Furthermore, do the research- while not 100% of everyone does better out of the office, most of us do.