BidClerk Reviews | Glassdoor

BidClerk Reviews

Updated May 21, 2017
69 reviews

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2.1
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Michael Gaynor
26 Ratings

69 Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • Good work life balance and work from home options (in 14 reviews)

  • The company maintained a decent work/life balance (in 7 reviews)

Cons
  • There were a lot of upper management who had no business being in their position (in 7 reviews)

  • No one knows what's going on or what tasks should be delegated to which office, so everyone is perpetually frustrated and confused (in 5 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "One shrinking part of a conglomerate."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Bid Reporter in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Bid Reporter in Chicago, IL
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at BidClerk full-time

    Pros

    -Team Managers actually care about their teams.
    -Chicago office had a good culture. Friendly people.
    -Bagel Friday was nice.

    Cons

    -When I left everything was in flux due to constant mergers. Best practices would shift daily.
    -Very high emphasis on performance. Upper management would motivate teams via comparing them to other locations.

    Advice to Management

    These issues might all be due to the merger. If not, make it a bit more appealing for employees to invest themselves in the company. Then it might be easier for people to provide the culture you are trying to cultivate.


  2. "Great First Place to Work"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Bid Reporter in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Bid Reporter in Chicago, IL
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at BidClerk full-time

    Pros

    No prior experience needed. Good Training. Good work life balance and work from home options.

    Cons

    Lack of upward mobility. Promotions don't mean all that much.

    Advice to Management

    Be more creative about how individuals and move their careers forward.


  3. Helpful (2)

    ""It's good as your first sales job, if your more seasoned look elsewhere""

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Account Executive in Denver, CO
    Former Employee - Account Executive in Denver, CO
    Doesn't Recommend

    Pros

    - Flexible time. You come in early you can leave at 2:30pm - 3:00pm everyday
    - Spread out office environment
    - Provide Lunches every Friday and early release for everyone at 2pm.
    - Quick morning meetings

    Cons

    Base Pay is low for the type of people they hire from extensive backgrounds and highly educated. Management has "restrictions" on providing "a $30K Base". Yeah right. Less experienced, less qualified sales professionals make $5K - $12K more in base and are constantly filtered incoming leads daily by management, totaling 3-5 sales per day for each of them.

    Its been addressed with management by other highly experienced team members that could not take the underlying disrespect for incoming lead distribution. I viewed three inefficient colleagues walk in the door late everyday and were handed incoming calls daily, receiving all types of accolades in daily team morning meetings. Grated everyone in that office, except for the ones receiving accolades of course. While I made my numbers there, I had to give my two week notice due to the aforementioned issues.

    Advice to Management

    Stop the story telling. When the organization merged with isgft and two other companies to create ConstructConnect Enterprise, everything started to go downhill more than they already was.

    Understand people have families with children, mortgage payments to meet. They work extremely hard with great daily effort to develop sales for YOU. Provide an actual system so that incoming leads (and the leads do come in daily), are equally rotated among all your hardworking sales professionals.

    I never received one lead ever. Neither did fourteen others that had been there longer than I was.

    You have one good manger, great mentor in that office with 20+ years experience in AEC data industry. The gentleman is passed up for promotions or even provided the opportunity to interview for them. Bottom line: Recognize the talent that you have in the room.


  4. Helpful (6)

    "A Company in Denial"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Reporter in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Reporter in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at BidClerk full-time

    Pros

    While I was working here I had the pleasure of working alongside a lot of really great people, but I'm not sure if the workplace still many of those great people due to layoffs and employees leaving. The office offered free bagels on Fridays, and a refrigerator full of soda if you're into that. The biggest perk was leaving the office early on Fridays, where the day would end at 2:30 p.m. The company maintained a decent work/life balance. You're done with work when the workday ends. Management also tends to be fairly understanding when it comes to taking time off.

    Cons

    There are a lot. As has been mentioned in a lot of previous reviews, the company has really been shaken up by SEVERAL mergers over the last year or so...but honestly, there were many problems before the mergers. The absolute biggest problem at BidClerk is the company culture...it's toxic and severely outdated.

    The company is extremely management-focused. That's not to say the company is interested in how to effectively manage its employees--but rather, it's focused on listening to only employees in management positions.

    The basic work day consists of repetitive data entry and calls to a variety of unfriendly offices. This work would be tolerable if management respected its employees enough to believe they'll do the work they're expected to do, but regardless of however many lateral "promotions" employees obtain in this office, team leaders are pressured by management to consistently hound their teams with daily productivity reports sent out to the teams that passive aggressively highlight specific team members' phone duration as a way to shame the lower performers into doing better.

    Often, newer employees will take these reports very seriously and stress themselves out trying to reach the arbitrary and usually unrealistic productivity goals set by management. These same employees will usually give up trying to appease management after several months of putting in strong efforts when they realize that the majority of those who have regularly achieved higher productivity have simply found the best ways to subtly cheat their way into obtaining higher call numbers and modifying more projects. By navigating automated directories and putting unconfirmed or false information into database projects, cheating employees receive the praise of management and sometimes even gift cards or other prizes. Meanwhile, many of the employees who decide to focus on quality over quantity receive emails or even personal Gchats from their team managers confronting them over their "lack of effort". There seemed to be no real investigation into who was cheating or how employees were getting away with cheating--likely because those were the employees who produced the numbers that made the company look better.

    As if that aspect wasn't frustrating enough, the BidClerk office was expected to be on constant clean-up duty for any of the many partner offices that the company merged with over the course of a year (CMD, CDC, iSqFt). Meaning BidClerk's employees were usually held accountable for any of the mistakes made by other employees, in other offices. The companies have now merged into one company named ConstructConnect.

    Many of the employees in this office spoke out about the dysfunction in the way the company operated along with the way the reporters in the office were managed--but those consistent appeals to management and HR were either met with a "we'll look into it" or no response at all. The new company CEO visited the Chicago office a number of times to take questions from company employees, but instead of providing answers to important employee questions, these visits usually resulted in several random anecdotes and vague objectives like "I want you to be excited to tell everyone at your family reunion about this job" or the most heinous: "I want this to be the best company to work at within 100 miles". It was only a couple of months after the CEO issued that statement that our office received notice that the company Healthcare premiums were going to be increased 300%. A bold first step in making the company the best place to work in all of Chicago. Not long after that, annual raises were aggressively capped

    In my last weeks working in the office, the environment was consistently tense and depressing. About 40% of the office desks were vacant due to other co-workers leaving for happier opportunities, resulting in a lifeless and extremely quiet work space. Based off of my experiences at this company, I don't expect any major cultural shifts any time soon. If you're an ambitious and thoughtful person I'd recommend you look for a company that will appreciate your skills and talents more.

    Advice to Management

    If you want to make the workplace better, and improve your reputation, sit down with your employees and discuss what needs to be done--don't talk down to them. Address dysfunction in the office. Respond to criticism with solutions, not vague promises. Offer reasonable career growth opportunities for those employees who give so much of themselves to your company. Make an effort to motivate by positive reinforcement instead of shame-based motivating tactics. Invest in improving company culture and employee happiness. Your company profits aren't worth anything if you're hemorrhaging employees.


  5. Helpful (3)

    "Look elsewhere"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Bid Reporter in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Bid Reporter in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at BidClerk full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Early dismissal Fridays, lax dress code, great location, easy work.

    Cons

    TERRIBLE communication. After the merges with three other companies, things really went down the tubes -- fast. Insurance is expensive and not great. "Managers" are promoted to that position by amount of time they have worked there, not by experience or management skills. There is little management training. Metrics are #1 -- and if you hit your goals too much, the only congrats you get is higher metrics. I once heard a manager say "if they do that much work for a $10 starbucks card, how much will they do for $15?"

    There are plenty of places that will pay you more for similar work and a better work atmosphere.

    Advice to Management

    Pay attention to the work environment. Start training your managers how to effectively manage. Also, HR needs to stop gossiping with favorite employees.


  6. Helpful (1)

    "Good Starting Point"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Editorial in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Editorial in Chicago, IL
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at BidClerk (More than a year)

    Pros

    The job requires little to no independent thought, if that's your thing. Also - No dress code, 2:30 dismissal on Fridays, option to work from home, great coworkers/young office environment, the work is easy and you never have to take it home with you. If you hit your metrics, management will leave you alone. They are also very flexible with letting you take days off without having to request far in advance. Despite the work being mind-numbingly easy, you do learn transferral office skills and you can talk the job up on a resume. Basically, its a good stepping stone to a better, higher paying position somewhere else.

    Cons

    Since merging with THREE other companies in the past year or so, the company culture has taken a turn for the worse. The office is tense and quiet, and everyone looks and acts miserable. It's hard to stay happy/positive in this kind of environment. There is poor communication from upper management and between offices. No one knows what's going on or what tasks should be delegated to which office, so everyone is perpetually frustrated and confused. The editorial staff gets lots of conflicting tasks/feedback. Employees are also expected to clock in and out and take lunch breaks at a designated time. Feels like more of an extended version of high school than an actual job.

    Advice to Management

    Keep working on improving communication, provide more room for career advancement and actually listen to employee feedback. Company morale is at an all time low and the product is suffering because of it.


  7. Helpful (2)

    "1.5 Stars at Best"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at BidClerk full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Early dismissal Fridays and occasional socials with catered food and beer.

    Cons

    When I was first hired, we had not yet been bought out by a private equity firm or gone through three mergers. It was a decent place to work, and job responsibilities built up skills that are easily translated into other office positions. There wasn't ever a plethora of career advancement opportunities, but you could put in a year or two as a resume builder and move on.

    Since the mergers, everything has gone downhill. Expectations for the reporting staff are unclear and constantly shifting, support for the content department is nonexistent, reporters are overworked without recognition, and the intimate, vibrant company culture we once had has disappeared into a corporate black hole.

    There have been several rounds of layoffs since early 2015, with the most recent occurring in early 2016. They have not hired in the content department of the Chicago office in ~6 months, if not more. This company has seen better days and the future for this "branch office" is looking bleak. If they do start hiring again, do yourself a solid and avoid this company. The skills you develop will not make up for the shenanigans of the job, the disgusting office space that is falling apart, or the way upper management devalues their employees.

    Advice to Management

    It's obvious the private equity firm is looking to squeeze this company for every cent that it can, but it wouldn't kill you to try to stand up for the employees.


  8. Helpful (1)

    "VALUE your employees"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Reporter in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Reporter in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at BidClerk full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    As many reviews on here say - not much. Before people started quitting, there were some really great people working here. Early outs on Fridays are nice (except management will constantly hang that over your head - "We're LUCKY we get this!" and threaten to take it away) Bagels are awesome, but these days, what companies don't provide food to their employees every week or on occasion? There is the ability to work from home as well.

    Cons

    In a 2 month time period, 16 people quit the company. Since the first merger with iSqFt in Oct. 2014, this company has been a sinking ship. Communication has gone out the window and the QUANTITY of work has taken trump over QUALITY. In 2015, BidClerk also merged with CDC and CMD. Only in the last month were we given any sort of script as to what to say when contacts asked about the merger - before that, we "weren’t allowed to talk about it."

    Direction is exceptionally unclear as to what reporters are supposed to do and who to call. There is a huge over lap between the four companies. Not to mention 90% of projects updated by iSqFt, CDC, CMD, or the off-shore teams are updated inaccurately (whether it be missing data points, completely inaccurate information, or blatant disregard/lack of knowledge of the construction industry.) This happens on a daily basis and BidClerk reporters are forced (either by management or self-mindfulness) to pick up the slack / fix these mistakes, in addition to their daily work. An additional cause of this might be that reporters from all 4 companies do not practice the same techniques, even though we are all trained in the same method of reporting.

    Expectations are raised every other day and are enforced with such demand that reporters cheat when updating work - usually by lying and leaving notes that a contact gave them project information, when it is clear that didn't happen. Three months down the road when a different reporter calls for an update, they’re told completely different information.

    Team leaders and editorial coordinators WILL micro-manage you in the most passive-agressive way possible. The amount of stress they put on phone numbers is insane. A reporter with 30 published projects and 60 minutes on the phone is praised. Another reporter with the same amount of projects, but only 30 minutes on the phone is reprimanded.

    Promotions are slim and occur laterally, meaning, you might be "promoted" to a new position. Your work load will increase, but your pay will remain the same. Speaking of pay, all reporters are paid the same amount, based on how long they've been here. This means that someone on the planning team (usually the first team you will be on) for two years makes the same amount as someone on the design team for two years - even though this person was “promoted” from that same planning team, and is expected to publish twice as many projects. The “raises” are capped at 6% - they have no concern with cost of living. Most employees make ~$35k a year. Also regarding pay - the health care benefits package almost tripled for 2016. If you got a raise after your first year, it wouldn’t even cover the difference of the new cost of health care.

    The office itself is dismal, especially with half of it empty due to people quitting and a hiring freeze since August 2015. The walls are a bare gray, with a few pictures scattered. Add that to the fluorescent lights and staring at a computer screen all day, your eyes will hate you. Cockroaches have been found and killed on more than one occasion, gnats fly around daily, and the carpet doesn't look like it's ever been cleaned. If you didn't have allergies before working here, you will now. Get ready to bring a blanket during the summer when the AC is close to freezing and wearing shorts in the winter when the heat is cranked up. Also, throughout most of 2014, a horrific smell permeated the office.

    Don’t let the job description fool you. Reporter, data gatherer, account manager - maybe to some extent. But really, it is a glorified call center. And as time goes on, more and more of the work is being sent to off-shore teams or the merged companies to handle. The HR “department” never knows what is going on - what little help they provide will leave you more confused than you started.

    Advice to Management

    Health care that's actually affordable

    Salary that is competitive - the fact that we have college degrees and weren't making $40k is astounding - this is CHICAGO. cost of living is one of the highest in the country

    Retrain half your employees becase they still don't know what they are doing

    Value your employees.


  9. "fine"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Customer Service Representative in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Customer Service Representative in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at BidClerk (More than a year)

    Pros

    there is no pressure to work overtime, and everyone is pretty nice. i loved my manager and my department. the benefits were great while i worked there.

    Cons

    the merging companies made everything very messy and strange. it was difficult to communicate and work with people in many different locations. it was pretty frustrating trying to take instructions from someone you know exclusively through email and maybe one conference call.


  10. Helpful (5)

    "Sales Development Representative"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Saies Development Representative in Denver, CO
    Current Employee - Saies Development Representative in Denver, CO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at BidClerk full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Early dismissals and free food on Fridays. I get to leave this place everyday. Casual dress code. Good coffee not micromanaged

    Cons

    Merger with ISQFT. They have taken over everything (Leads, time clock, email, health insurance, CRM and even stealing accounts to get sales). There is no collaboration on sales teams. No job openings in Denver for advancement. ISQFT is going public with this merger thing and when it is all said and done (end of 2016) the branch in Denver will not be around and the investors will get their ROI and leave everyone else in the dust. Better make your money now sales reps.

    Advice to Management

    Send leads to everyone not a selected few. Be more proactive about training. We need better workstations. Why did ISQFT get a new luxurious office meanwhile ours looks like a office from the 1970's?


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