Brafton "articles" Reviews | Glassdoor

Brafton Employee Reviews about "articles"

Updated Aug 12, 2015

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3.3
57%
Recommend to a Friend
92%
Approve of CEO
Brafton President Tom Agnew
Tom Agnew
26 Ratings
Pros
  • "Brafton provides a really nice work life balance - with an added bonus of getting to work from home one day a week(in 53 reviews)

  • "Brafton certainly gives writers the resources to become a solid writer(in 20 reviews)

Cons
  • "New writers are expected to produce 3-4K words per day and the pay / benefits are unacceptable for college graduates(in 58 reviews)

  • "Upper management would rather lock clients into contracts rather than give the creative teams the resources they need to actually make clients happy(in 20 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

Reviews about "articles"

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  1. "A truly fantastic place to grow, gain experience, and absorb so much knowledge"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I have been working at Brafton full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    I've been with Brafton since it was a small start up, so I've been through all the growing pains as the business blossomed from 12 people to 200. This company provides a truly great environment to work in. Here are some of the reasons why after 4 plus years, I am still as happy as I was the day I found out I was employed :) -Growth opportunities are insane. Brafton is truly a proponent of taking chances on people who they view as having more potential than perhaps experience, and they also always look to promote internally instead of hiring out. As someone who is in a hiring position, half my team are transfers from other departments. Brafton wants people who are really thirsty for the job and eager to work more than someone with an impressive resume. Because of that, you can move departments easily and really advance yourself. And because the business is growing so quickly, you have the opportunity to rise through the ranks at an accelerated rate and really gain valuable industry experience. -Environment is great. The company gives off a more laid back, with the times feel than most corporations. It's an open layout, so you are always able to talk amongst teammates and walk around. They have a relaxed attitude about working remote (it needs to be earned, but work from home is very attainable in most departments). They have quarterly company meetings where each department gets to present whats going on, so it's so inclusive. They give out entertainment budgets for teams to do activities outside of work, and have in office parties both company or team wide to celebrate occasions. I have made some truly great friends here -Open door policy with upper management. all lower and mid level management sit right on the floor with their teams, and senior management is extremely accessible. You can ask for time with the CEO or COO without a problem, and their office doors are (literally) always open. I find it so gratifying I can knock and speak with any of them at any given time. -Industry knowledge. I've absorbed SO MUCH knowledge about the SEO and content world just from working here. People are always emailing out articles, videos, tips. Cross department shadowing is encouraged. Trainings and meetings are always announced ahead of time and people are always welcome to attend. I've gone to several presentations not for my team just to learn what was being presented that day.

    Cons

    Of course, there is always the other side of the coin, and Brafton is no exception. These are a few things I would like to see changed. -Clearer job paths for ALL departments, big or small. It's easier to map out how one can advance in a larger department like sales. Butt for smaller teams, I think they deserve the same amount of time working on job descriptions and advancement opportunities -More recognition and upper management attention for non-revenue producing teams. I work in one myself, and I have seen perks and easier resource and recognition and really time spent developing and rewarding teams that directly impact the bottom line. To me, all departments whether handling accounts or not impact the bottom line and should be treated the same -I think everyone will always say this, but we are still operating a bit on the start up mindset and as such, our salaries (to me) are a little below market average and don't always match the title you may have. Also, and this goes with job path, but a clearer look into salaries and reviews and when to expect pay raises or how to get them would be great. -A bigger office! I love the location but I wish, since we are growing so much (yay!) that the Boston office was larger so we can have lunch rooms or relaxation spaces like some of the satellite offices

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    Brafton2013-04-29
  2. Helpful (10)

    "Get all you can out of it and then leave"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Brafton full-time

    Pros

    Probably the most valuable aspects of Brafton – as others have mentioned – are the relationships you're able to build with your coworkers. I can honestly say some of my closest friends are my former colleagues. This is bound to happen when you're working in a business that generally skews on the younger side, which is great when you're transitioning from your college life into the real world. I can also say that I was always given the ability to have a semi-flexible schedule, which is why I stayed at Brafton as long as I did. While most people wouldn't consider this a "pro" per se, it really helped to have a job you could kind of coast through while you pursued other passions to pay off in the long run. Another pro to Brafton is that you get a lot of experience. You just have to make sure it works in your favor. Think about what you really want to add to your resume and act on it. Want to shadow social media to learn more about it? Go for it. Thinking about a career in customer service? Listen to how account managers build relationships with clients. Don't fully understand what you're supposed to be doing? Read some of the articles the creative marketing team publishes. All of this will help you in the long run as you begin to look for your next role.

    Cons

    My biggest piece of advice would be if you have any prior business knowledge, run FAR away. It will only hurt your brain. I can't even begin to count the number of times during my tenure that I sat in on a meeting discussing processes, strategies, future ideas, what have you, and thought that I was in a spinoff of "The Office." Yes, there are truths behind the idea of startup culture, but Brafton has also been around for more than six years at this point and it's still dangerously lagging behind what other agencies are doing. Do not get me wrong; there are PLENTY of creative people at Brafton. The problem is, they're bogged down with more accounts than some boutique agencies have in total, and do not have the time or the energy to fully execute their awesome ideas. Instead, Brafton puts a million processes in place that don't add any value to the clients or the employees, which brings me to my next point…. To succeed, Brafton NEEDS to hire people to run teams from the outside. You have people who have been promoted into roles they have absolutely no business being in, and the company ultimately suffers for it. It's not these people's faults completely, they just don't know any better because Brafton is their only experience. You can only wing it so far before you start to do real damage. The good news is this kind of behavior wouldn't fly in most established companies, which is all the more reason for those smart enough to leave Brafton after one year. Seriously. Get your experience and go. The longer you stay, the harder it is to come out on the other side unscathed. This brings me to my final point… I never really realized just how miserable I was at Brafton until I found another job in a stable environment. Don't misconstrue my words – I can't count the number of days I sat at my desk and thought to myself "wow, I'm so miserable" – what I mean is, for the first few months at my new position, every time I turned something in, I winced. "How many things are wrong with what I just handed in?" "Will my idea be called stupid only to have someone else take credit for it three months later?" "Can't wait to work really late tonight just to do it all over again tomorrow." My self-confidence was shot. But never fear! In the real world, people will encourage you for a job well done. They'll be SHOCKED at the amount of work you can get done in a day. Your new peers will marvel at the vast knowledge of the digital realm you have but were never able to fully execute at Brafton because you also had 50 other to-dos for that day alone. You won't be rewarded for a job well done with more work than any human can physically handle. You won't be given a title that means absolutely nothing and essentially prevents you from being taken seriously elsewhere. You won't have to sit in meetings and listen to people belittle you for thinking a different way. Instead, you'll simply be appreciated. You'll leave work at a normal time. And you'll notice you're a lot less on edge.

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    Brafton2015-08-13
  3. Helpful (11)

    "Brafton drains the souls of writers while filling the Internet with content pollution"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Writer in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Brafton full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    - You don't need to be a good writer to work here. Reading articles made me nostalgic for my days tutoring college freshmen, because the quality was often similar. - Working from home is a nice perk. - The Boston location is right in the heart of the city, which can be a plus.

    Cons

    - Writing for Brafton involves crunching out a considerable amount of content day-in and day-out. Quantity, not quality. - As content creation is based on the number of words, articles are rife with filler. - Because of the content volume, writers are typically forced to semi-plagiarize articles from other sources, "repurposing" them for the clients. - Research time? Practically none. In my experience, most writers acquaint themselves with a few topics and repeatedly write about them. - Pay: Lousy. - Socializing: Minimal. There's no time in the day for writers to chat with one another. "Worker drone" describes much of the company environment. This is one of the least friendly places I've worked, despite being filled with writers.

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    Brafton2014-01-12
  4. Helpful (8)

    "Brafton gaslights employees and degrades the writing profession"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - News & Content Writer in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at Brafton full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Your next employer is going to be floored, scared, confused, and impressed by your ability to churn out 450 articles per month.

    Cons

    Little do they know, however, that you didn't do it in a typical 40-hour work week. Brafton thinks they're doing you a favor giving you $28,500 right off the bat (evidenced in management's attempt to gaslight its employees in the "grain of salt" review), but when you're working 60-hour weeks to finish all of your work, you're making $9 an hour before taxes. I never once had a normal 40-hour week, not even my very first week working there. People who end up in management often have zero business being there. They usually just get a nice title because there is literally no one else to do the job. People with actual managerial experience would never accept a job at Brafton, and they know that. There is a sense of community, but only because there's an unspoken understanding that you're all doing the lowest-quality work of your life. Most of the time you do not get a byline, but on the other hand, we are too embarrassed about the work we're putting out to even want our names attached to it. The sales team overpromises, and writers are penalized for underdelivering. This is a sweatshop for writers/content farm in disguise. I have never felt more degraded as a writer in my life. Hard work was rarely acknowledged, even the times I stayed until 11pm to make sure I completed everything on time. (Yes, "times" plural. I was good friends with the security guard and cleaning crew by the time I left.) Also let's not forget that multiple coworkers there have resorted to therapy and anti-anxiety medication as a result of this work atmosphere. Good thing there's health benefits. When I left, I was offered the opportunity to freelance for Brafton. Great, I thought, I wouldn't mind part-time work. Now I wasn't expecting too much from them in terms of payment considering you start out in poverty, but what they offer ($5 per 200 words) is so insulting and far below industry standards, they should be ashamed of themselves. *Especially* considering their strict guidelines and request for original, researched content. Brafton takes advantage of people who are desperate and acts like we should be grateful, but what they're actually doing is cheapening our profession as writers and greatly diminishing our value. Thankfully I am no longer desperate and was able to get out and find employers who knew my worth and weren't just trying to make a buck. TL;DR - There is no work/life balance, you're going to be taken advantage of whether you're prepared for it or not, they do not care that you're human, and taking this job degrades the writing profession.

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    Brafton2013-07-25
  5. Helpful (4)

    "Writers Sweatshop"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Editorial Writer in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook

    I worked at Brafton full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    When you are interviewing for any position, for the rest of your career, you will be able to say that you were able to write 450+ articles a month, on topics so obscure that they might have to Google them. Your next employer will then promise you that you will never have to do that again. That by far is the best feeling in the world. Oh also, I lost about 15 lbs because things like eating lunch were frowned upon.

    Cons

    So I came to Brafton right after college. How right after college? Two days after I graduated. That should have been a LOUD warning siren. I was a journalism major, and a Statehouse Correspondent for a prominent paper, and I thought that this would be a great move in order to keep my writing skills sharp and to keep using my degree. It took me about 5 days to realize that neither of these things were going to happen. After my first month, I realized that the only way that I was going to complete my workload was if I was going to show up at 7:00 AM and stay until 7:00 PM, or later. After working in a newsroom for most of my college life, I didn't really think twice about the 12 hour work day. However, most of the time, when working in a newsroom, you are putting in the work to write a great article about something important - whereas at Brafton, you are putting in that time in order to write 20 quasi-plagiarized 250 word "news briefs". Sales guys would promise the moon and back to clients and then clients would be disappointed when they didn't receive what they had expected. To be fair, I was upset when I realized that I wasn't doing what I expected to be doing and left Brafton (which I assume is the same trajectory that clients take). One of my "fondest" memories where when there was a CMS upgrade, and apparently all 50 of my stories for one client never got delivered. When this came to light, my manager FIRST blamed me for lying about my numbers. So, when I showed him all the drafts of them, he then told me that since they were not delivered in a timely fashion and the stories were now "old news", I had to write an additional 50 stories THAT week or face disciplinary actions. I was not the only one who had articles "disappear" during this "upgrade", but I guess it's totally fair to blame the writers. I guess it works - we were the bottom of the barrel their anyways. No work life balance, unless your life is all about work that doesn't pay. Then this is the perfect place for you. It seems to be managed by the people who have been here the longest or drink the most on weekdays - however, managerial skills are seriously lacking. In a nutshell, if you think you have to work here because you need to pay for a roof over your head... you are better off working in retail and freelance writing on the side. You'll make more money and generally be a happier person.

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    Brafton2013-07-29
  6. Helpful (3)

    "Overall, negative"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Writer 
    Doesn't Recommend

    I worked at Brafton

    Pros

    It's a new company that seems to be breaking into a new market. Considering that many are giving up on print journalism, the concept of online news stories has its benefits. While working there you learn a lot of neat little facts while researching online for your articles and how to throw together a news story quickly; good practice for any writer I suppose. I would say the pay is OK but as someone else said, not so much when you consider how much clients are charged per article.

    Cons

    - as a writer you will be producing low-quality material, churning 20 sub-par articles a day - some of the supervisors do not know how to communicate clearly and kindly with writers - depending on what team you are on, you may be stuck working with snobs who sneer at work that isn't a replica of their own - the biggest problem is the environment; management is unaware of the necessity to create a supportive atmosphere for employees (those with concerns or issues should be given a source to talk to, to confide in, at the very least)

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    Brafton2011-11-01
Found 6 reviews