Bud's Ambulance Reviews | Glassdoor

Bud's Ambulance Reviews

Updated August 19, 2017
5 reviews

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  1. "Great job. Some management issues"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Paramedic in Dolton, IL
    Current Employee - Paramedic in Dolton, IL
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook

    I have been working at Bud's Ambulance part-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Some of the best EMS experience available in the country. Very high volume, frequent high acuity calls, running with BLS FDs. Extremely rewarding area to work in. Good autonomy in this system, and management is generally pretty relaxed and fair if you're not a problematic employee. Casual, comfortable work environment, most people are friendly and easy enough to work with. Pay is comparable to other private agencies.

    Cons

    Dated equipment. High turnover. Field training for new hires is very short. No training offered beyond CPR and ACLS.

    Advice to Management

    Invest in training staff and be more selective in hiring. Merit based raises would help retain skilled staff. This is the highest volume 911 agency outside of the city-- so much potential to be leaders in the industry. Throw your weight around and push for changes.


  2. "medicar"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Freelancer - Anonymous Freelancer
    Former Freelancer - Anonymous Freelancer
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at Bud's Ambulance (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Local compamy thats all i have say

    Cons

    There medicars half of them ac doent work. a couple of bad drivers.Thiers drivers dont do pre shift checks on vehicles. driver better training.

  3. "Go Elsewhere as an EMT-B"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - EMT-B
    Former Employee - EMT-B
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    Pros

    As an EMT-B, you're technically allowed to run municipal 911 calls, but depending on the dispatcher, you may never see one. So count on maybe one 911 call a shift as an average. Some days a couple more, most days not even.

    Cons

    I wish I could use profanity because all of the profane language in the world might come close to the frustration that stems from working at this place. I cannot speak for medics as I am not one, but I will share my observations. Far too many medics at this company are rude and catty and will, behind doors that are presumed closed, s--t talk the BLS crews until the cows come home. Very drama oriented here. Medics think they're hot stuff. The day time dispatch office consists of either washout medics or medics that cannot work with anyone on the road as no partner wants to work with them. The night dispatch is good as are the night managers, but the likelihood of getting a night shift is slim to none. There is only one BLS car on at night. You will have to run errands and collect food/coffee. You might even have to do a coffee run for the hospital staff. That's about the worst part of night shift. Dispatch will not hesistate to ---- you over on day shift and you will spend 30-50% of your day doing little company of Mary discharges with 5 minute transports. Medics get all the nice rigs and BLS are left with second hand rigs that are falling apart. Half of the cars have been miraculously redirected from death and feel as if they're going to explode driving down the highway. Hope it doesn't die on you on the highway or the brakes don't go out, both have happened. The seats in the rigs are so worn that they have metal sticking out and you have to use wheelchair pads, depending on which car you're in. The steering wheels fall apart in your hands. The vents blow lukewarm air and smell of rancid garbage. Carbon monoxide and exhaust fumes leak into the rigs from the air vents. The sirens die while running 911s. The decals are tearing off and the shades of colors don't match. The sides of the cars are rusting. They're embarrassing to drive and be seen in. The equipment is old and outdated. Half of the medications are expired. Drug bags have gone missing. Medicare fraud runs rampant. You'll be doing all of your work on paper until the iPad system is back (it was up for a few months and then taken away again because the crews cant be bothered to fill out the run forms properly). BLS crews have to pick up wheel chair van transports in the ambulance (which the patients are almost always upset about) because of overscheduling of medicar transports to understaffed medicar drivers. The dispatch office doesn't know whats going on and will lie, give wrong addresses, give wrong room numbers, give wrong info, give wrong anything and get mad at you about it. Management is of no help. The white uniform shirts are terrible as they collect stains like no tomorrow. The patches themselves look like children's activity patches, like Boy Scouts. Embarrassing uniform to be seen in. The only long term BLS employees are in 1 and 1 mixed ALS/BLS crews (which are impossible to get into due to the oddly homophobic manager that oversees the program) so your partner will likely be a novice as a BLS crew member. The office will try to overwork you for beyond low, bull---- pay. Just say no. They are too desperate to discipline their employees. No one gets fired from Buds. Scheduling is a nightmare. Some days you will come in and not have a partner, some days you'll sit around for hours watching paint dry waiting for your partner who was scheduled on a different shift and you'll inevitably be asked to stay over the same amount of time that you were sitting. Some days you'll switch ambulances 3 times and do a crew swap mid day. They'll pay for a small portion of medic school but they'll want 2 years of employment afterwards. Let's do the math here- 2000 dollars for 2 years forced tenure? No. Seriously I could go on all day about how much bullshwat you'll put up with here but this has to end somewhere. You're better off at a place where they won't cuck you for 911s and force you to endure low pay, miserable working conditions, bad calls, and more drama than anyone should ever have to endure.

    Advice to Management

    Fix yourself.


  4. "Honest opinion"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    Pros

    The only reason you should come work at this company is for the 911 exposure. You will run some spectacular calls and learn a lot and see a lot on the job. It may make you a better paramedic.

    Cons

    The management is extremely incompetent for the most part and you will have to succumb to everything they say and have you do. You can have no opinions or suggestions. You will do great at this company if you can be a mindless drone and a yes man. They don't pay you enough and work you like a slave. There is no job security or stability. You can be fired at the whim and fancy of management with no reason given whatsoever.

    Advice to Management

    Treat your employees with the dignity and respect they deserve. They are out on the streets saving lives. The patients are usually thankless and mean. No reason they should have to endure that behavior from their employer.


  5. "EMS"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Paramedic in Dolton, IL
    Current Employee - Paramedic in Dolton, IL

    Pros

    The only reason to become an employee for Bud's is the experiences obtained performing 911. As an employee you will see everything from the most ridiculous medical to the most horrific of mci's.

    Cons

    The downsides are plentiful: pay, security, stability, etc..... The equipment is dated and the vehicles are carbon monoxide traps. The system protocols are also very consevetive, that is, your hands are mostly tied. The only defense is that the communities are mostly made of uninsured non tax paying citizens.

    Advice to Management

    Good luck...better training, employee reviews, repairs, system assistance. Downfall is you are contracted to the hospital that also provides your training.