Business Insider Reviews

Updated Sep 10, 2020

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3.4
52%
Recommend to a Friend
82%
Approve of CEO
Business Insider CEO  and Editorial Director  Henry Blodget (no image)
Henry Blodget
55 Ratings
Pros
  • "Great people to work with, fun but serious work culture, many events going on to alleviate stress(in 9 reviews)

  • "Unlimited vacation and the opportunity to work from home are nice(in 7 reviews)

Cons
  • "Lack of guidance from editors, especially on the editorial team(in 14 reviews)

  • "Because of that the newsroom is greatly lacking diversity(in 11 reviews)

More Pros and Cons
  1. "Amazing place to work"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - SEO Strategist in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Business Insider full-time

    Pros

    Great people. Great HR. Great programs.

    Cons

    There are no cons to think of!

  2. "Great team"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Data Analytics 

    I have been working at Business Insider full-time

    Pros

    Collaborative, work-life balance, good team work, unlimited PTO, flexible work time

    Cons

    career opportunity, career development, learning curve is not steep (but just for me)


  3. COVID-19
    Helpful (5)

    "Yellow journalism is the rule, real reporting an exception"

    1.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Reporting Fellow in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Business Insider full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    This has nothing to do with the journalists themselves, who I knew only to be diligent and thoughtful.

    Cons

    The place is a content farm. It prizes speed and efficiency over all else. I'm baffled that any of the leadership, including senior editors, consider themselves journalists. That is, generally speaking, an unduly generous description. The leadership's basic function is to ensure that our work garners clicks. During my six months: - I was given an (aggregation) assignment to be turned around in about an hour. The only relevant sourcing I found was in another language. I told my editor that I could not possibly do foreign-language research. They told me that it seemed like I just didn't want to do the assignment, that they were too busy to help me, and that I needed to figure it out on my own. This was a few weeks after I arrived. - An editor subtweeted me because they thought a pitch of mine was foolish and naïve. This was a few weeks after I arrived. - I was given an (aggregation) assignment that fully relied on a "news report" from a US-government-funded publication. I could not locate any other reportage that corroborated this news item. I wrote the piece and it immediately went viral, relying as it did on Sinophobic propaganda. I asked the assigning editor if we could update the piece to reflect that a portion of my report relied on information from a US-government-funded publication. The editor asked why such a qualification was necessary. Around the same time, another editor told our team to avoid citing from state-funded publications in Russia and China. An editor who believes that only US-government-funded media is legitimate doesn't deserve to be called a journalist. They should be labelled a propagandist. - The pandemic began and I started pitching about how the coronavirus could affect refugees in European transit camps. An editor eventually told me that no reader would be interested in such a story. By the time I left the fellowship, Business Insider had published more than 4,500 coronavirus-related stories. Three mentioned "refugees." - Editors routinely deleted source quotes that questioned conventional wisdoms. - Senior editors only praised my work when it went viral. I worked long and hard on the few features I was given time to write, and I felt that some were among my best work. We clearly had different understandings of what constitutes good journalism.

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  4. Helpful (2)

    "Clown Car"

    1.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Reporter 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Business Insider full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    We used to have a nice office. All of my coworkers are very kind, hard workers, who mean well.

    Cons

    Absolutely incompetent management from the top down, with a mission that is just not compatible with journalism. Reporters are constantly chasing clicks or subscriptions, to the point it dramatically effects which stories are told to the detriment of readers.

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  5. "Video Editing Fellow for BITV"

    5.0
    Current Employee - Video Editing Fellow in New York, NY
    Recommends

    I have been working at Business Insider full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Freedom to experiment and produce interesting stories.

    Cons

    Sometimes order of communication can be frustrating.

  6. "Pros and cons"

    3.0
    Current Employee - Reporter, Business Insider in New York, NY

    I have been working at Business Insider full-time

    Pros

    Good benefits, higher-end pay, some good and supportive managers

    Cons

    Often have to fight for coverage

  7. "Great place for mentorship and feel valued."

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Editorial Fellow 

    I have been working at Business Insider part-time

    Pros

    BI has given me a lot of opportunities for growth. I really enjoy my manager's commitment to helping grow as a journalist.

    Cons

    I do not have any cons

  8. Helpful (6)

    "Not worth the stress"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Reporter in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Business Insider full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Flexible working schedule, can work from home plenty of days

    Cons

    Huge lack of diversity. There are exactly 0 people of color who are in leadership positions, which is problematic. Management constantly says "We're working on it," in every meeting, when it's addressed. Lack of guidance from editors, especially on the editorial team. Managers don't give constructive criticism that's helpful, they pretty much expect you to figure it out for yourself. Employees are severely overworked for the amount of pay they get, and are not allowed overtime unless "given permission," which defeats the purpose of overtime since you essentially will never get permission to do so. Reporters are left navigating the field without support and guidance, which are essential to helping reporters perform functions.

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  9. "Best newsroom I've worked in, with flexibility and great communication"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Reporter in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Business Insider full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Working at Insider has been like watching my career take off in a rocket ship. My beat has changed in response to what readers seem to be responding to, which I think is the mark of a good, analytics-driven newsroom. I'm well-supported by editors who guide, but don't smother, and by a staff that can help out with great graphics, photos, etc. I can't say enough good things about the culture. Lines of communication to my direct editor, senior editors, and even the CEO couldn't be more open. My team is sticky (a rarity in media) and collaborative - no one has ever been territorial about coverage areas or sharing bylines. This is a place where good talent gets noticed, nurtured, and compensated well. The few HR issues I've had were taken care of swiftly and appropriately, which unfortunately can feel like a rarity in some newsrooms. It's a great place for self-motivated people who want to be out with their ear to the ground; this isn't a newsroom where you'll be handed daily assignments. We're producing work that gets better every quarter, individually and corporately, and we're read by top decision makers at companies across the country. The newsroom also reminds me of the best parts of journalism school: we have frequent trainings and guest speakers from a diversity of backgrounds to learn from each other and external experts.

    Cons

    Lack of ethnic diversity on particular teams and in upper management is a problem, but it seems like management is working on ways to tap new pools of talent

  10. "Nice place to work"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Reporter in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Business Insider full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Open to new ideas, supportive of innovation, no rigid hierarchy (do good work + you'll get ahead)

    Cons

    Dearth of people of color in Business Insider FT reporting roles and in management

Found 105 reviews