CalsonicKansei North America Reviews | Glassdoor

CalsonicKansei North America Reviews

Updated October 18, 2017
56 reviews

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3.3
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Kiyoto Shinohara
21 Ratings

56 Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • Great place to work and great benefits (in 7 reviews)

  • Good Benefits for the employees (in 4 reviews)

Cons
  • Low salary, long hours and poor management (in 4 reviews)

  • Poor management needs to lead by example (in 4 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "Production Technician"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Production Technician in Lewisburg, TN
    Current Employee - Production Technician in Lewisburg, TN
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at CalsonicKansei North America full-time

    Pros

    I have found the supervisors to be supportive and accommodating. The production quotas are achievable. Simply a nice place to work.

    Cons

    As with most production based positions, time is spent standing and producing the same parts each day. It is helpful that the factory floor is heated and cooled to provide as much comfort as possible for such a large expanse.

    Advice to Management

    I would ask that management continue to provide opportunities for people to grow. It is important for Calsonic Kansei to diversify its product line to remain viable.


  2. "Has good benefits and pay"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    Pros

    They have good benefits and pay but are removing some of them. The company does have a ton of upward movement for manufacturing.

    Cons

    They are fickle in the decision making process. Management needs to make more of the decisions but they leave that to the people they work over.

    Advice to Management

    N/A

  3. "It's okay for a factory job."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Production Technician in Shelbyville, TN
    Current Employee - Production Technician in Shelbyville, TN
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at CalsonicKansei North America full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    The work isn't too difficult, and it pays well enough to live off of.

    Cons

    Depending on where you end up in the plant, you may work 10-12 hours a day, or you could end up on a line that still has all 3 shifts and only have to work 8 hour shifts. The overtime is a bit too much on most lines being in there nearly every Saturday or working 12-hour shifts every day. For me, that's a con, but for those wanting/needing overtime, it can be a pro.


  4. "Production technichian"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at CalsonicKansei North America full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    A lot of overtime pay.

    Cons

    Horrible upper management. Hot environment to work in. If you want to have a life I suggest you not to work here. Expects way too much of their workers and do not care for their physical and mental well being. You are only a number for this company.


  5. "Sales"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I worked at CalsonicKansei North America full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Great work life balance, supportive team members, decent salary, decent benefits and 401K. This is a great place to start in sales if you are fresh out of college.

    Cons

    Promotions are not given fairly, it is more about who you know rather than the work you do.


  6. "Could have been Great (Long, Worth reading entirety)"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Warehouse Associate in Shelbyville, TN
    Former Employee - Warehouse Associate in Shelbyville, TN
    Doesn't Recommend

    I worked at CalsonicKansei North America full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    There was always work to be done which was great. The majority of the base level employees were always wonderful to work with. They were always willing to help and teach you new things. They made every attempt to make you feel like family even if management wasn't for it unless it was their idea. The pay was decent for the job, but I will get to that shortly.

    Cons

    The management was the biggest issue there. Day one of me starting I had never worked in a warehouse nor had I ever used an Intermec scanner. I was introduced to everyone and then management just walked away as everyone else got on their forklifts and drove away. I had to go and find my Group Lead who was quite upset that I didn't know how to use the scanner, where everything was in the warehouse or how to change an electric forklift battery. (Up until this point I had spent 6 years exclusively on propane lifts in a metal fabrication facility.) A week in and I'm starting to get the hang of things. It is almost quitting time and we are now trying to finish scanning in the remainder of the day's incoming shipment before the other shift starts. I am told by, who I thought at the time was a well "respected" employee, that it's 5 til and that another individual and him are staying late to complete this, go home. The next day I arrive and I am told by my coworkers that my manager had told everyone else that there was going to be a "special" job for me and another recent hire for leaving early even though were lead to believe that the manager and this individual had discussed this prior to our departure. You see the problem was that my manager went home 2 hours early and my Group Lead was nowhere to be found. (This was a reoccurring problem that happened every week, almost every day.) I pressed the manager on this and it was immediately said that everyone else was lying, but was quickly changed to ,"I might have said that," when I pressed the issue further. Issues like this continued over and over again. Even as going as far as the same manager allowing the individual who told me to go home to miss at least 6 days of work, with no ramifications as it was swept under the rug. The same manager also lied to HR about an argument that I had had with this employee, by telling them that I had instigated an argument on my arrival to work over a disagreement he and I had the previous night. When in reality this individual was attempting to bully me into speaking about what had happened in the break room in front of the other employees even when I repeatedly had stated that, "Yes it happened, no we aren't going to talk about it, its over lets just get to work and put what happened in the past." My manager made us stay there in front of everybody instead of taking the discussion behind closed doors even after I had requested it. HR came to do an investigation on what had turned into a prolonged argument in the break room initiated by my manager, but threatened to suspend me indefinitely unless I told them "more" of what had happened. I told them there wasn't anymore to the story, they had my full written statement and I didn't know what else they wanted, when they asked, "Why did you keep arguing in the break room, why didn't you leave?" That's when I told them what my manager had done and they were appalled by the fact she refused to handle this behind closed doors.

    Speaking of HR, good luck. During this entire process I was the one on trial. I was the bad guy, even though the interviews with the other employees all aligned with my perception of what had happened and was happening on our shift. No matter what I said or did I was always questioned multiple times about it. At the end HR, management, the other employee and I had a face to face discussion to resolve the issue. I was asked only factual questions. "This happened because of this? You told him that," etc. Where as the other employee was only asked emotional questions such as, "And how does this make you feel? Why do you feel like you're disliked? How do you want people to look at you?" HR sat on his side of the table along with my manager and another manager sat in the corner as an observant. I was on the other side all by myself. Psychologically, the room was setup against me. HR demanded that I repeat my entire side of the event/s as they unfolded. I had denied that, based upon the fact that 1.) He hadn't been asked once in the entire hour long discussion to describe his encounter in full detail start to finish, and 2.) That they had my full written statement along with a digital document that they had typed their notes on the laptop, in front of them, regarding the questions they had asked me during the initial investigation. Needless to say they became irate. I was told that I wasn't helping their situation and that I was only making it more difficult on myself. I told them that if they would like to flip through their documents and pick out things that I had written or said that was fine, but I was NOT going to repeat the entire ordeal while they read from my written statement in hopes that my story had changed. Silence for a solid minute. (It had been 2 weeks and by the way they were questioning me it was clear of their intent.) The entire situation ended with my original solution to the entire ordeal. I proposed to shake hands this time and forget about it, just as I tried to achieve in the beginning.

    Oh and that overtime. They are going to tell you that it "Comes in like the rising tides with the seasons. It will be busy, busy, busy and then there won't be any." That was not the case. We had to work an average of at least an extra day 3 weeks in a row if not the entire 7 days. Management would "draw up" the schedule every month, but it almost never changed. I always worked 2 Saturdays in a row, then a 7 day work week, 1 weekend off, then another Saturday and then the schedule would come out and repeat from the beginning. We were always told that we would get the OT schedule as soon as possible, but on average we would receive it right before leaving on Thursday. The only altercations to the schedule would be days that people had asked off for, which was an option, but you were never guaranteed the day you wanted. Oh and those days you go in on Saturday, they either need you or they don't and they don't know until about 2 hours in. (Even though manufacturing knows the entire schedule of production for the weekend on Friday night.) So if there is nothing to do you get to stay for 4 hours instead of the full 8. But that's only the weekend schedule. Then you have "your" day to stay over and work an additional 4 hours weekday schedule. It never changes. So Monday is the busiest so if you get put on Monday be prepared to stay no matter what. If you're on Friday you're a tenured employee and you wont have to stay. Oh, and if that someone isn't there for their weekday to stay over they are going to look for volunteers. If you think volunteering is going to earn you any favor or maybe one extra Saturday off on the next OT schedule, nope. No volunteers? We are ALL staying. Did management stay? Well the group lead did, but all he did was sit around and talk to the other Group lead of the incoming shift for 4 hours on a regular basis. Is everyone from the incoming shift here for work? Yes? Does that shift have more employees then yours? Yes? You get to stay anyways. What was weird about this OT was that we couldn't handle the entire work load with the amount of employees we had, we were told that they weren't going to hire more because we were fully staffed, but they wanted to cut the OT by 15%. None of it ever made sense. "But all this OT pay it's great?" Do it for a year. Volunteer to stay 3 times in a row because, you are the last person asked to stay and you're management tells you, "If you don't stay everyone is going to be mad and I told them you are their only hope." The OT pay was never worth the amount of time I didn't have outside of work.

    Advice to Management

    Look long and hard at your managers. One in particular that I met was a great person. Knew how to treat you as an individual, but still was a bonafide leader. That individual should be the model you use for management. Just because someone was in the military doesn't mean they are a great leader. There is a clear difference between that and a boss. My manager was former military and couldn't lead. When times got tough, instead of chipping in and helping, would disappear for hours. Sometimes to the office other times who knew. Instead of leading they'd use scare tactics and try to make shady deals with other individuals to get the results they wanted. Those shady deals caused quite a rift between those who weren't receiving those "favors" and our manager. It's really hard to respect someone who doesn't respect you and doesn't hold everyone to the same standard. I've read the other reviews. This type of manager is a dime a dozen in your company.

    HR should be unbiased from the beginning to end. They act as the "court" of the company when dealing with employee/employee related issues. They should never go in with a predisposition on who is right and who's wrong. They should be looking for the facts and they should handle situations based on them. Not on emotions.

    The OT would have never been an issue had I known about it's circumstances from the beginning. Transparency is key in this issue. If the workload can not be finished within the allotted shift there is an issue. Either no one is doing anything (Improper Management), there is too much load not enough hands (What I experienced, Perception of the amount of people needed to complete the task is skewed do to a cost savings), or it really is just busy (For a year?). Honestly explain to everyone why there is such a high demand for this OT. Be upfront about it. Give an estimated time table so these employees understand how long the outlook for it is. Give them a light at the end of the tunnel.

    The company could be great, I believe that, but when you truly don't listen to or invest in the people giving you their time how can you ever expect to have people who are truly satisfied with their employment. If you would ask some of the individuals who have been there for 10 years or more they might not tell you, but they always talked about how things had changed. How the "family atmosphere" used to be the norm. How they truly felt that C-K used to care about them. Instead while I was there it was completely the opposite. Full timers lied on their "satisfaction surveys" out of fear, they always just wanted a month without ridiculous amounts of overtime, and all they wanted from management was transparency. They felt like C-K had let them down in a way and so did I.


  7. "Calsonic"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at CalsonicKansei North America full-time

    Pros

    Great salary and benefits; promotes teamwork

    Cons

    poor communication from senior management

    Advice to Management

    get to to know your team; foster new ideas and growth

  8. "Okay"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at CalsonicKansei North America full-time

    Pros

    People are great
    Benefits are good

    Cons

    Diversity is lacking
    Location is rural


  9. "Production tech"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Production Technician in Shelbyville, TN
    Current Employee - Production Technician in Shelbyville, TN
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at CalsonicKansei North America full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    There is a lot of over time normally and insurance isn't to bad.

    Cons

    No advancement opportunity unless your in the click. No heat or AC for most of the week and weekends there is none at all and raises are few and far between and insurance goes up every year and coverage goes down.

    Advice to Management

    You say you care about the employees but it's not shown.


  10. "Great Company with bright future"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Farmington Hills, MI
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Farmington Hills, MI
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at CalsonicKansei North America full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Great staff at all locations, with Management dedicated to the success of their staff in many locations. Benefits are very good, as well as overseas opportunities

    Cons

    Base pay could be more competitive within the industry, late night meetings with Japan can become frequent and very unproductive

    Advice to Management

    Listen to staff about education and future development.


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