Capco Associate Reviews | Glassdoor

Capco Associate Reviews

Updated Oct 23, 2019

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3.7
93%
Recommend to a Friend
95%
Approve of CEO
Capco CEO Lance Levy
Lance Levy
23 Ratings
  1. "First Year"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Associate in New York, NY

    I have been working at Capco full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Great Opportunities, Great People, Great Clients

    Cons

    There are no serious cons

    Capco2019-03-09
  2. "A Start-Up for Good and Bad"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Associate Consultant in Washington, DC
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Capco full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    - exposure to high-level employees - meaningful responsibility on projects - great culture; depends highly on office, but all offices seem good - travel is possible if wanted, and avoidable if not

    Cons

    - little oversight on bench, new associates to fend for themselves

    Capco2019-10-23
  3. "Associate Consultant"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Associate Consultant 
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Capco full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Solely within the financial services sector, you know which clients you would be staffed on. Plenty of opportunities to get involved beyond client work.

    Cons

    A lot of implementation work, can be political

    Capco2019-10-09
  4. Helpful (3)

    "There’s a reason the turnover is so high"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Intern - Summer Associate in Washington, DC
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Capco for less than a year

    Pros

    Amazing bond between associates, senior consultants are very approachable, will likely get you a better job at a different firm

    Cons

    Like the associates, you will probably be left with no work to do all day, Almost none of the projects are real consulting work, they are project management roles with status reports, upper manangement is naive and grossly unfair to some consultants, little understanding of how companies are growing in this era. Also their dc office isn’t actually in dc it’s a small office in McLean.

    Advice to Management

    Take care of your talent.

    Capco2019-03-27
  5. Helpful (10)

    "A satisfactory start to any career"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Associate in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Capco full-time

    Pros

    - Skillbuilding Working at Capco was a great opportunity to develop fundamental business analysis (BA) and project management (PMO) skills. My managers provided frequent constructive feedback that allowed me to constantly improve. I've learned that if you keep an open mind, you will rapidly hone your delivery quality, flexibility, stakeholder management skills, time management instincts, and sense of urgency. I... am convinced that these are valuable skills to leverage wherever I go. - Willingness to cultivate you (if you push for it) If you are willing to put in the extra time to meet key players in the firm (Partners, MPs, Human Capital, rapidly promoted individuals) and have clear learning goals, they will leverage available resources to help you. It might not be exactly what you ask for (and you might have to ask multiple times), but if you talk to enough people with a goal in mind, you will receive some resources. I know one consultant received tuition assistance for a Python course at NYU. Others have gotten staffed on projects in functional and subject areas they found interesting. This kind of networking is tough for AOs to do, but if you're willing to eat into your weekends or time after work, it can be very rewarding. I didn’t do this myself, but I saw the positive results for others. - Attitude adjustment Consulting requires humility. Capco hires kids out of top schools. They often have egos and high expectations for their post-graduation career direction and pace. I was no exception. I think this contributes to Capco's churn rate. However, you will hit a brick wall in your career if you don't learn to untether your ego from the type of work you do and the feedback you receive. It will stifle your willingness to learn new things and motivation to challenge yourself to improve. Depending on your project, the work could be tedious, granular, and esoteric in nature, so humility is make-or-break for your time at Capco. For me, it was a painful but rewarding adjustment. I survived by focusing on improving my BA skills instead of the specifics of my project work, which I didn’t find very interesting. - Learning what you really want to do in the future Regardless of what you end up doing, your time at Capco will help you find it. There is a ton of sector, technology, and practice area informational events/showcases that teach you about existing or aspirational Capco focus areas. For example, there was a highly successful Initial Coin Offering event with impressive guest speakers. Something might pique your interest there. You might meet interesting people you want to collaborate with. I definitely benefitted from the broad exposure that these events offered. It can also help if you're doing a project you don't want to do. I spent much of my time at Capco concerned about the opportunity cost of each day I was at my project versus other roles that might cultivate me more efficiently. I made the absolute most of it and grew exponentially, but I was still convinced that it wasn't enough for my learning and career targets. As a result, I was highly motivated to figure out what really inspired me and what opportunities were out there.

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    Cons

    - Aggressive project staffing I was selected for a project before I even started the two-week training program. I didn't feel like I had a choice because I was informed by colleagues at many levels that it is a very bad look to turn down project roles, especially at the Associate level. I mentioned this to HR three months into my first project and HR informed me that this is not the culture they are trying to... cultivate. By this time, it was too late. It's not easy to arrange to roll off of a project and I was told by my coach and colleagues that it complicates performance reviews and a smooth promotion schedule. While it's flattering to know that people think you'd be effective on a project with an immediate staffing need, it can lead to a lot of frustration and missed opportunities that I experienced up to my final day. I hope they're making changes to this shared tacit assumption that I observed within Capco’s culture. - Insufficient expectation management of prospective AOs I perceived this as the biggest con. Elements of this con encouraged me to begin a passive job search which led to my eventual departure. Check out the Advice to Management section where I break down the issues and how they could be resolved in the future.

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    Advice to Management

    - Managing AO expectations about the nature of the work To AOs: Capco isn't spearheading a fintech revolution or anything. It's consulting for the financial services industry. Depending on your goals, you may not find many projects exciting. Don't expect a steady stream of fintech, digital, or strategy projects. Don't expect a series of short projects, either. While there's a chance you will have this experience,... there is also a lot of implementation work which can be long-term and esoteric. Some of it is basically staff augmentation. That's not necessarily a bad thing if you're focusing on fundamental skills and less concerned about the greater significance of your project work, but it’s important to keep your expectations in line with reality. To management: The above messaging isn't communicated clearly enough to prospective AOs. This contributes to morale, reputation, and churn problems. Other reviewers said that Capco's hiring practices are deliberately misleading and I would disagree. I think there is a gap between the nature of projects we highlight to candidates and the realistic set of available project work. I would avoid mentioning aspirational focus areas and practices to junior candidates who heavily weigh these exciting details in their early career decisions. I recognize that some of this information is available up front and that prospective AOs have a responsibility to do their research and listen for these key details. However, it's clear from these reviews (and what I've seen and experienced) that a number of prospective hires do not research this so deeply. As much as it would be nice to rely on new hires to know this before making their decisions, more emphasis on managing expectations on the nature of the work would greatly improve selection, retention, and satisfaction of AOs. - Managing AO expectations and transparency about rank, reputation, and promotion As for my expectations, I came from a very competitive school where the expectation is to grow rapidly with clear growth KPIs on the resume. Capco isn’t like McKinsey, Bain, or BCG. It’s not like the consulting groups at the Big 4 firms, either, although Capco is getting there. The expectation (not entitlement) follows that if I exceed expectations at a smaller, lower-ranked consultancy, I’ll get promoted faster there than at other, bigger-name consultancies. This matters for many reasons. Competitively speaking, I need to show on my resume that as a substitute to brand name, I was able to rise very rapidly within a professional services company. In the case of a company like Capco, that should be a change in title within, not after, a year of joining (again, provided excellent performance). Regarding transparency, I only learned after resigning that I had strong advancement prospects within a satisfactory timeline. Before resigning, I had no solid evidence of my standing and advancement expectations within the firm. I also had a substantial amount of anecdotal evidence that even if I was a next-level performer, I wouldn’t be assured a chance for promotion before the 18-month mark. I worked closely with two Associates who I deeply respected and saw as role models due to their ability to manage situations that project team leads acknowledged was far above the level of Associates. They were passed up for promotion at the 12-month mark and resigned before their next performance reviews. Not only did I lose my role models, but I also had clear evidence that I wouldn’t be hitting my desired resume KPIs fast enough, leading to a passive job search which eventually led to finding employment elsewhere. To be fair to Capco, key figures in management and human capital personally expressed their interest in resolving this and voiced their regret in the anecdotal cases I witnessed. My advice is to provide transparency and expectation management to Associates regarding advancement. After performance reviews, instead of just communicating a rating and providing vague, tentative suggestions of their implications for advancement, Capco should clearly communicate to Associates whether they are being considered for promotion at the next cycle and what performance level they would need to reach or maintain to hold up their side of the bargain. If there are clear expectations for both sides to “walk the walk,” Associates will know what they can expect, work towards, and look forward to. This will greatly improve retention, morale, brand, and performance quality. - Clear communication of roles and capabilities for advocating for employee needs I didn’t know until after I resigned what various people in the Associate Enablement Team could actually do for me. If the roles and capabilities of these individuals were communicated in practical terms (i.e. “I can push for you to roll off,” “I can switch your coach,” “I can get you in touch with people who are staffing for projects that fit your interests,” “I can facilitate discussions on your performance and advancement), these team members would see more AOs reaching out. This would lead to greater alignment of AO goals to their experiences at Capco. If I was 100% certain that a given team member had the power to pull through on a given request in the organization, I would have been much more likely to reach out and solve problems that would have greatly improved my time at Capco. - Coaching commitments and expectations for both the AOs and their coaches It's hard for AOs to demonstrate interest in a specific learning or staffing goal because (A) they're unsure of how that can be realized and (B) may be vacillating between several pathways and specializations. It would be great if as a practice, coaches said: "Give me a list of areas that interest you. I'll tell you the ones that someone at Capco could help you develop. Then you have to pick one. For the one you pick, I'll do everything in my capacity to ensure that you get the exposure you're looking for." That would give AOs deep exposure aligning with their interests early in their time at Capco and would be a major retention and morale solution. Compare that to how some Principals, MPs, and Partners will say "keep an open mind" and "just be a sponge" when AOs approach them with interest in specific practice areas or projects during the 2-week training program. While that is definitely a great attitude to have, it's very valuable to ensure that AOs are building their engagement and faith in the firm. Deflecting specific learning interests can stifle the energy that entry-level staff want to bring to the table. - Communication between upper management and junior staff AOs and COs form the core of delivery teams. Since they can get pretty bogged down by day-to-day delivery requirements, they often lose sight of the significance of their work within the greater project context and the current Capco and client outlook on the project. Large meetings don't necessarily help, as it's harder for Partners to engage audiences at every experience and knowledge level than one-on-one meetings. One suggestion is for Partners and MPs to block off 30 minutes of each day to reach out and speak to a different AO or CO one-on-one. While COs and AOs can and should reach out to do this on their own as well, it would be encouraging to see Partners and MPs displaying an effort to do the same thing. This would greatly increase morale, engagement, and pride in the firm.

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    Capco2018-03-29
  6. Helpful (1)

    "Associate Consultant"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Associate Consultant in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Capco full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Great client exposure Technologically savvy teams

    Cons

    Demanding work schedule Promotion depends on relationship with management

    Capco2018-03-02
  7. Helpful (1)

    "Great Experiences and Growth Opportunity"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Associate Partner in Macomb, MI
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Capco full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Capco is an agile and nimble firm that allows individuals to find their own career path while still providing a support structure to enable that growth. I have been at Capco for almost 8 years and in that time have seen a lot of change, all of it positive. I've worked at larger "big 4" firms and would not disparage them, I just find that for myself I truly enjoy the flat structure, the merit based recognition. I... find the organization easy to navigate and the access to senior management is unlike what I had experienced at other firms. I really think Capco is a great place to work and grow your skill set in the not just Financial Services but in the Technology that supports it as well. As someone who came in at a more junior level and has been able to take ownership of internal parts of the organization and help shape and grow our offerings and client relationships I really do see the value of the firm and encourage others to see it too.

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    Cons

    The firm doesn't have quite the scale or name recognition (yet) of bigger firms so have to explain the value of Capco initially when talking to clients but once they understand who we are that becomes much less of an issue. I've seen other reviews about how "unfair" or "random" the review processes are, and I'd have to say I've never seen a "perfect" performance management system at any of the firms I've worked at... nor at our clients, I think the management truly cares and fights for our people but it does require individuals to own their own career, for people who just want to punch the clock and "9 to 5" it - they're not going to see the same growth as someone who puts in the extra time and effort it takes to get ahead - and that's no different at Capco than anywhere else in my opinion.

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    Advice to Management

    Continue to provide career path guidance and education and visibility in to the broader strategic goals of the firm to allow all levels to contribute to that vision.

    Capco2017-09-07
  8. "Good place to start"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Associate Consultant in Washington, DC
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Capco full-time

    Pros

    Easy Access to upper management Good support for employees Opportunities to influence the firm They invest in training

    Cons

    Boys Club In DC you tend to get stuck on really long projects

    Advice to Management

    Staff more intentionally based on skills and interests not just on availability and timing

    Capco2017-06-30
  9. Helpful (1)

    "Great place to work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Associate Consultant in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Capco full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    People, prestigious clients, meaningful work, fantastic vacation compensation

    Cons

    Work can sometimes be stressful with deadlines

    Advice to Management

    Expand to more cities in the US

    Capco2017-04-10
  10. Helpful (1)

    "Greate first job"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Associate in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Capco full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    There are countless ways to grow and develop quickly as long as you are motivated. Employees have the opportunity to drive their own careers, but can do so with the comfort of having a coach to help you navigate the way. Joining directly after graduating from college was perfect because the training program prepares you to hit the ground running, rather than being thrown into a job that you are not yet prepared for.

    Cons

    Promotions seem to be increasing difficult to achieve

    Capco2017-02-08
Found 71 reviews