Cerner Reviews | Glassdoor

Cerner Reviews

Updated October 20, 2017
691 reviews

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Pros
  • Work/life balance for my team is great (in 140 reviews)

  • Pretty good place to start a career (in 48 reviews)

Cons
More Pros and Cons

  1. "Solution Designer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Cerner full-time

    Pros

    Lots of young talent is here and new project to work.

    Cons

    Benefit is not that great for a family.


  2. "Implementation Consultant"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    Pros

    Good benefit package, good gym and food on site

    Cons

    Long hours for the pay

  3. Helpful (2)

    "Prepare for abysmal work\life balance as system engineer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Systems Engineer in Kansas City, MO
    Current Employee - Systems Engineer in Kansas City, MO
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Cerner full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Health insurance, 401k, being able to work from home if needed, good place to start a career in IT, pays for relocation

    Cons

    Be expected to work at least 48 a week; so much work that you can easily drown and fall behind; job gives me an insane amount of stress and anxiety; Cerner processes are overwhelming including change management; too many instances where I have to do work on the weekend or late night; work\life balance as an system engineer under Client operations is completely abysmal


  4. "Software Engineer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in Kansas City, MO
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in Kansas City, MO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Cerner full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Good Engineering/Dev culture; Dedicated set of professionals;

    Cons

    Work/life balance; Slow paced city


  5. "Software Engineer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in Malvern, PA
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in Malvern, PA
    Recommends
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Cerner (More than a year)

    Pros

    Good work culture, health benefits
    Decent place to start your career

    Cons

    Internal tools restrict your learning capabilities
    Not very high salary
    No bonus


  6. Helpful (1)

    "Production Owner"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Cerner full-time

    Pros

    There has historically been a culture of competence in the operations world at Cerner due to constantly living on a razor's edge and being responsible for patient safety. If a Production Owner messes up, patients could die; there are very serious repercussions to being bad at the job and at the end of the day this makes the role focus on what matters: Clinical system uptime and performance. Whenever there is a client outage or severe incident, bureaucracy and politics fall by the wayside and the full weight of the entire company is behind all the teams working as best and as quickly as they can to resolve the issue. That is the best part of the job, doing work that actually matters.

    This role is solely responsible for the systems, servers, and processes happening to, for, and by the client. The "one throat to choke, the one back to pat" system is necessary and effective for managing clinical systems that have live patient data and care occurring in them.

    The Production Owner role has historically had 75% of it's time focused on the management of client production systems and the other 75% of it's time on managing client relationships as the primary client contact for all systems. This requires the associate to have a thorough understanding of all the various technology stacks, processes, and projects going on in their environments; both internally and externally. The exposure to continually new technologies and direct interaction with clients, from an end user technician to the client CIO, certainly allows for the Production Owner to grow their skill sets and competencies.

    The official unofficial rule is that the Production Owner role is one of the main paths to management at Cerner in the operations divisions. In theory, "first you must manage systems well before you can manage people that work on those systems" makes sense.

    Cons

    A good Production Owner must be aware of all things happening with their clients at all times; this is stressful, to say the least. A Production Owner is on call 24/7 at all times. The role has an exceptionally high average of hours worked a week, even by Cerner standards. In addition to that, production environment events often happen at client off-hours to reduce clinical system impact and risk; working irregular hours and maintaining the regular day job takes a toll.

    The "one throat to choke, the one back to pat" system is difficult for management to follow, as the necessity of the role is most apparent when there are bad things happening that need to be resolved as soon as possible; a Production Owner that works to prevent those bad things from happening is often not recognized as the pain was never felt by management. It is always obvious when the "one throat" needs to be choked, but it is very difficult to prove that the "one back" should be patted based off of the lack of bad things happening.

    The Production Owner must lead, teach, mentor, and work very closely with the engineering resources on their team. Technical leadership at Cerner has usually been based informally off of who could actually do the best work, this is definitely a positive; but for associates that are performing poorly, the only formal course of action for the Production Owner to take is to provide that feedback to management. That feedback is unfortunately most convincing to management after issues have occurred from the actions or inactions of the poorly performing associate in question.

    The clients assigned to a Production Owner can range from tiny to massive, from impossible to please to infinitely gracious and thankful. Clients are made up of real people, and people often act arbitrarily. It is a roll of the dice and depends on the history and context of each individual client.

    The Production Owner role is technical in nature, but the boss that the associate reports to is not in a technical role. Sometimes that boss has a technical background and sometimes they don't, but either way the boss is in a position that requires a different skill set altogether. As the role is tremendously unfocused and collects all the work, tasks, and problems that are not explicitly defined for other positions, there is an enormous amount of work that goes unnoticed by management (unless it is not done well, in which case it becomes a serious problem in production environments). The metrics used for gauging the efficacy of an associate in the role are not effective at measuring how "good" anyone is at being a Production Owner. To look at it cynically, a Production Owner is only truly incentivized to do two things: fix production environment issues in a timely manner and do whatever their boss thinks is important at that point in time, as that is really all that is truly visible to management.

    Advice to Management

    The Production Owner role must fundamentally change over the next decade. The continual increase in solutions and technologies being implemented in the client environments is an ever growing number of things that the PO has to be aware of, have a thorough understanding of, and to fix when they break. The Technical Engagement Leader role is all too often given more status and weight to their words, despite never truly having to feel the pain of the TEL's failures as it becomes a production environment issue. The PO role's responsibilities have encompassed every aspect of client operations, from leading the technical resources on the team to ensuring projects are implemented flawlessly. The work continually increases and the compensation remains the same; looking at it pragmatically, how are you going to keep POs in 5 years time?

    The PO role should change into a more administrative role, and the TEL role should take responsibilities of the PO role such being as the primary contact for incidents and outages. The DWx EC/EL relationship is something that should be looked at for the pros and cons of adopting ideas for the PO/TEL relationship. Right now, if a TEL is bad at their job, the PO then has to do that job as it eventually becomes a production environment issue; if the PO reported to the TEL, then the PO in that scenario would simply be an excellent associate for the TEL and the TEL is incentivized to praise the PO as being an excellent direct report. Presently, the context is all too often that the incentives are for the PO to have their throat choked while the TEL gets their back patted.

    The day to day care and feeding of client environments should be the responsibility of the PO: Managing code package promotion, ensuring compliance for updates and configuration best practices, and triaging and delegating work to the engineering resources. Production, nonproduction, and project work need to be tracked by a single source; the PO would be best suited to be the "one throat to choke and one back to pat" for technical resource load balancing and the TEL could be the "one throat to choke and one back to pat" for the higher profile responsibilities such as maintaining uptime and ensuring client satisfaction. This is a massive change from the historic roles, but has the company not changed considerably over the years and is the company not on a path for a faster rate of change?

    Cerner operations is truly world class at being reactive; there is no problem that they cannot solve swiftly. Management needs to begin being far more proactive, or this pain will eventually be felt.


  7. "Great Work Atmosphere"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    I worked in the Upgrade Center at Cerner for two years. The people are all very young, it's a great working environment and I generally enjoyed working there.

    Cons

    By the time I left, the Upgrade Center had become extremely regulated and we were required to follow an unbelievably strict timeline. It became monotonous and hard to grow as a professional individual.

  8. Helpful (2)

    "Stable job"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in Kansas City, MO
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in Kansas City, MO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Cerner full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Great Health insurance and onsite clinics.
    Work culture is ok.
    There are many teams working on exciting technologies but you should get selected on those teams otherwise it's dead end.

    Cons

    Good for first job, do not wait here for long. Yearly raises are not that great in many teams.
    Company pays less than other competitors.
    When you first join they give you tour of Kansas City downtown because there is no good thing in Kansas City.
    No bonuses
    Imp : If you get selected in team working in CCL then run. It is a dead language and company is using that to get money for clients for support. No other use.
    All campuses in Kansas City as company gets major tax cuts

    Advice to Management

    Give good raise.
    Give bonus for employees.
    Update technology stack. Get rid of CCL


  9. Helpful (3)

    "A place to start"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Technical Solutions Analyst in Kansas City, KS
    Current Employee - Technical Solutions Analyst in Kansas City, KS
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Cerner full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    The work is interesting and can be rewarding.

    Cons

    Heavy workload. Constantly changing envrionment (software, metrics, etc.). Can be overwhelming. Almost all training is on the job, supplemented by Wikis. You are at the mercy of those within your team willing to take time out of their busy days to help you learn your job.


  10. "Good place for new grads"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Cerner full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    some teams are really good.
    Cool new campus

    Cons

    Very bad pay
    Devcenter - graduating is mostly luck based


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