Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation Reviews | Glassdoor

Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation Reviews

Updated December 22, 2017
78 reviews

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Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation President Brian Hooks
Brian Hooks
4 Ratings

78 Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • There are dozens of training opportunities for professional development and leadership places a huge emphasis on professional growth for their teams (in 13 reviews)

  • This attitude makes work life balance really easy and the work environment very pleasant (in 6 reviews)

Cons
  • Though they teach you Market Based Management, they do not practice what they preach (in 6 reviews)

  • Mid-level management is either nonexistent or underutilized (in 9 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Featured Review

    Helpful (2)

    "Grateful"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    I'm part of a team that's engaged, committed, focused, and collaborative. Colleagues from across the organization are willing to help me work through a problem or hone an idea. And--I think this is the best part--we're working smarter and more strategically than we ever have. I'm thankful to be part of an organization that holds itself and its staff to a high standard. When I come into work in the morning, I trust that everyone I'll work with that day is there to contribute; no one's mailing it in or just punching the clock. That keeps me on my toes and sometimes does mean that I'm nervous about a project or stretched to try something new, but those are all things that help me give my best.

    Cons

    We're going through a maturity phase that's been a challenging and change-rich time. I agree with the direction that we're moving, but I find that sometimes, my coworkers aren't productively focused on what they can do to help us move forward, but rather on what they think others are doing wrong. It's normal to feel uncomfortable in a time of change, and if people don't agree with the direction we're heading (strong strategies as a foundation, effective integration across the org, a bolder public presence), I understand--people disagree on these things--but let's work together to solve it.

    Advice to Management

    Keep it up! I've never felt more proud to work here.

    Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation Response

    Oct 6, 2017 – Vice President and Chief of Staff

    Thanks for writing this review. Our collaborative culture is rooted in our Guiding Principle of Knowledge—requiring us to seek and use best knowledge from our colleagues across the organization while... More


  2. Helpful (2)

    "I've had the freedom to take new angles to tackle problems while collaborating efficiently towards our vision."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Operations Assistant in Arlington, VA
    Current Employee - Operations Assistant in Arlington, VA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Great colleagues - 95%+ of employees are fantastic at what they do and everyone cares deeply about our vision
    Great work environment - there's a positive and energetic sense to the place, and even when something goes wrong, it's handled pragmatically with an eye towards future improvement
    Strong sense of fulfillment from knowing the organization values your efforts
    Great feedback culture helps you grow your skills
    The organization is always adapting to new challenges, so your time is never wasted

    Cons

    It's chaotic. It took a long time before I could confidently say I understood the organizational structure around me. There are sometimes missed opportunities everyone doesn't know what everyone else is doing. But for an organization of our size, we do a good job building bridges across teams to improve collaboration.

    There is hardly ever a moment to breathe. We like to "sprint the marathon," which means there's always more to do with a high sense of urgency.

    Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation Response

    Oct 25, 2017 – Vice President and Chief of Staff

    Thanks for telling us about your experience. Our staff’s passion for our vision is one of the things I love most about working here, too. It motivates me to always be looking for ways to innovate... More

  3. Helpful (5)

    "Working here was a step backwards for my career"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation full-time

    Pros

    There really are none. With most jobs there will be something that is positive, but this is just a very toxic place.

    Cons

    Upper and middle management have no idea what they are doing. They only seem to have experience working in non profits and it shows.

    There is a lot of gossip spread around the organization at all levels.

    Promotions and raises are given to friends rather than awarded based on merit.

    Working conditions, pay, and benefits are bad.

    And overall this place is just weird. The employment agreement even comes with an non disparagement clause that covers talking about Charles Koch's brothers.

    Advice to Management

    Management is the problem. I'm pretty sure this place is beyond saving, but if someone wanted to try they would need to clear out all of management and start again.

    Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation Response

    Jan 4, 2018 – Vice President

    We agree that having diversity in experience is important, and that is why we’ve focused more intentionally on the talent we’ve brought into the organization. In fact, about 75% of our new hires in... More


  4. Helpful (9)

    "If I had a job offer from this place or a kill shelter I'd choose the kill shelter"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Program Manager in Arlington, VA
    Current Employee - Program Manager in Arlington, VA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    If you work here there is one upside: your life can't get worse. Rock bottom can be freeing if you accept it.

    Cons

    As the title says, working here is worse than a day job that involves routinely killing puppies because no one wanted them.

    Advice to Management

    I will not anthropomorphize management. Taking on advice requires introspection, a quality reserved for humans.


  5. Helpful (11)

    "Needs to practice free-market ideals it preaches"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation full-time

    Pros

    Nice colleagues in a "go-along-to-get-along" type of way.

    Cons

    All I can say about the reviews on here is #MeToo

    Has there ever been a greater irony than a free-market organization plagued by the exact same problems of bloated government?

    Despite preaching value creation, the organization produces little-to-no value. This makes it impossible to judge performance, and people get ahead by pull rather than merit.

    It also means that processes are valued more than outcome. That means those who learn office politics and corporate speak are promoted over those who produce. That's not to say there is zero production. But there is virtually zero production that is put to market, in the way consumer goods or (in the nonprofit sector) research and communications are.

    As a result, work is judged subjectively by longtime staff rather than objectively by the market. And given that great producers often aren't also great office politickers, you can imagine which people get ahead. (The Ellsworth Tooheys.)

    There is nothing more depressing than seeing good work overlooked in favor of bureaucratic work. As a result the organization continually loses its best, most-productive employees.

    There is a massive bias toward inaction because there is no value in risk-taking because there is no risk-reward trade off because nothing is put to market.

    They say they love Hayek's "Use of Knowledge in Society," which highlights the vital need of price signals to allocate resources. But there is no effort to bring any sort of price signals (or their nonprofit equivalent) into the workplace.

    Projects get black-holed because there is no incentive to act on them.

    As mentioned, all this is virtually indistinguishable from government work, which is ironically funny if it weren't so sad.

    Advice to Management

    Spend some money to hire a consulting firm like Boston Consulting or Bain or whatever the equivalent is at Koch Industries (if it exists) to do a complete review of the organization. Define what your value creation is and orient everything toward that. If it is professional development programs, then compensation and title should stem from employees' contributions to them. If it is policy and communications, then compensation should stem from how the public reacts to employees' policy and communications efforts.

    Hire experienced employees -- like those who have run JP Morgan's one-year professional development banking curriculum -- to run the associate program and its offshoots. Despite colleagues being nice, they are totally insulated from real-world economic forces and are not good role models for new hires and program participants.

    Short of a complete revamp, it might be worth closing down. Just like the government destroys and misallocates scarce resources, so does CKI, in the sense that it takes those who want to advocate for a free society and hamstrings them.

    If you can't teach young libertarians hard skills to advance the cause and their careers, and you aren't offering a product that the market is willing to pay for (or at least consume), these resources would be better used elsewhere.

    Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation Response

    Nov 17, 2017 – Vice President and Chief of Staff

    I am truly sorry that during your time at our organization you were not personally fulfilled, and that you were not connected to the impact you and your teammates were having. Over the past few years... More


  6. Helpful (4)

    "Great Culture, Great Mission"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Associate Director in Arlington, VA
    Current Employee - Associate Director in Arlington, VA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    I've worked at the Charles Koch Institute (and Charles Koch Foundation) for a total of 7 years; I've also worked at a non-profit that partnered with them and received grants from them. To me, there are two overwhelming "pros" to working at CKI: culture and impact.

    First and foremost, the culture. It fits my personality very well. It's very entrepreneurial--I really value that I have the ability to prove myself and take on more and more responsibility. And, directly related to that, I value that I'll be held accountable for my results -- good ~and~ bad -- not only in terms of the impact of my projects but also how I treat others relative to our organizational principles/values. I like that those principles/values (our "Guiding Principles") are meaningful--from interns to the president and even Charles, we all have the same standard and (though far from perfect at implementing it) are held to them. I've seen very talented people get fired because of issues with respect; I've been in dozens of interviews where we turned down an otherwise top-notch candidate because they lacked humility or integrity. It's refreshing to work for a place that takes these things seriously, which limits things like playing office politics or having to worry that a colleague is waiting to stab you in the back to get ahead. Finally, I like that our culture is defined by ~guiding~ principles, instead of detailed rules and policies.* Our management philosophy (market-based management, or MBM) gives us a lot of ways to ask questions and view an opportunity, but it doesn't give us answers. So, there's an onus on us to figure things out. On the downside, if you're more of a paint-by-numbers person or like to know exactly what's expected at all times, it can be tough; but for me, I value that we try to be nimble and constantly evaluate what make sense, and constantly try to hold each other to the principles we care about (instead of some rule or budget written 12 months ago by someone else).

    The second big pro for me is that I'm very driven by our mission, and I value being surrounded by people who are similarly driven in a culture where we focus on actually getting results instead of just doing activities that make us feel good. If you feel that the best way to help the most people is through more freedom and equally protecting the rights of all, or if you're passionate about issues such as free speech, toleration, limiting costly wars, free markets, and reforming the criminal justice and education systems, then this is a great place to work. Again, we could be doing a lot better, but in my experience MBM really makes me more effective, and pushes us all to do better. And, just because we're a non-profit, I'm not being asked to sacrifice my paycheck for the cause--in fact, the better I do for the cause, the better I've gotten paid. Speaking as an employee, and a supervisor, I've seen firsthand that for those who get results and who do so with integrity, respect, etc. (that is, following our Guiding Principles), the compensation system works very well.

    Money aside, though, it's very fulfilling to work at a place where you get rewarded for your results (not your pedigree or how long you've survived), you're surrounded by people and a founder who cares about the things you care about, and are in a culture that is effective and principled. There's no such thing as "the one, best work culture" for everyone--that said, if any of the above sounds like a fit for you, I'd wholeheartedly recommend CKI.

    *As an aside, I've seen a few comments here about CKI being "bureaucratic." I've worked in bureaucratic places (schools, rigid non-profits) and definitely would NOT use that word to describe the culture here. I don't mean to deny the experiences of those reviewers, but it may be the case that someone had a bad experience: perhaps they were let go, or quit due to frustrations from being on a struggling team--in either case, it'd be likely that they did experience more questions and checks on their authorities (after all, if a team or individual isn't doing well, there would likely be more limitations on someone's authority to make decisions, not more). That could feel "bureaucratic" but in my mind I don't conflate that with the overall culture of the organization. For example, I've had times where I've not done well, and had more constraints put on me; it wasn't fun, but I think it's consistent with our culture and principles, and ultimately that helped me do better.

    Cons

    One that I alluded to above is that there is a lot of change. Because we operate by guiding principles instead of detailed rules, blinding following budgets, or waiting for your boss to tell you what to do, we are all constantly evaluating as we move forward. To me, that's a feature, not a bug (I'd rather put up with the pain and uncertainty of change and make a bigger impact than taking the easy way of "following the plan" ); but, it's true that working in a fast-changing environment can be tough.

    I think we have room to improve when it comes to choosing lower or mid-level managers--we too often fall into the trap of assuming that a promotion has to include becoming a manager (though this is definitely getting better). So, this can take people out of where they can make the biggest impact, and puts them in positions of leadership though they may not have that skill set or may not appropriately drive our culture forward as a leader should.

    Advice to Management

    I like that we're moving more and more to a system where we handle "training" based on the individual or team, instead of putting large groups of people through the same thing. I'd continue to do that.

    Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation Response

    Sep 29, 2017 – Vice President and Chief of Staff

    I appreciate you sharing your thoughts on how professional growth should be as unique as each individual employee. Supervising is a specific way to grow, but not the only way to grow. We have dozens... More


  7. Helpful (16)

    "A Review"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Program Assistant - University Investments in Arlington, VA
    Current Employee - Program Assistant - University Investments in Arlington, VA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Decent compensation for a nonprofit in DC, but they could afford to pay more.

    Cons

    Culture:
    -Highly political and hierarchical. Brown-nosing with UI team "leaders" who control everything is essential to survival and success on this team. We talk all day ad nausea about the importance of "challenge" and "change," but don't you dare challenge leadership.
    -Adopt Koch language at all times. Remove "objective" with "value prop" and "doing well' with "creating value."
    -Feedback is another purported pillar of our culture, but feedback on this team typically only happens during your review - excuse me, your "360." 360s give team members the chance to crap on you to your manager - excuse me, "supervisor" - while having never raised any such matters with you to your face. I also witnessed several team members get canned who had assuredly never received any performance feedback.
    -Speaking of being canned, every junior level team member of mine - scratch that, every junior level employee at CKF and CKI - lives in constant fear of being fired. Machiavellian to the max. Hire quick with abandon, fire quick when that new hire surprisingly doesn't fit your needs. Exception: if you are a close friend of team leadership, you will never be fired or confronted about your performance. In fact, you'll be promoted at a faster rate than more worthy and productive colleagues.

    Accountability and effectiveness:
    -"Honor donor intent" is one of our guiding principles. Yes, we invest millions in higher ed. No, we don't have a system to assess effectiveness of grants, ROI, etc. We methodically lie to our board, partner donors, and leadership with vague and inflated updates about the "value that's being created." There is zero accountability for grantmakers making a bad investment. Such colleagues also regularly dishonor donor intent by tacking on vacations using company money, extravagant meals, conference fees for a conference that we spend an hour attending, etc.
    -"Data integrity" is the term this team uses to pretend it's assessing "value" aka ROI. In reality it's just a way of counting and tracking that doesn't truly inform decisions. Junior employees are tasked with entering absurd amounts of data into a poorly designed Salesforce structure. Ironically, Mr Koch warns against creating charts for the sake of charts ("Charts for Charles") in his book Science of Success. Mr Koch is an honorable man with great intentions, and it's such a shame to see his money being flushed down the toilet.

    Advice to Management

    Hire an outside consulting firm (eg McKinsey) to evaluate business model and management effectiveness. Radical change is needed in this toxic environment.

    Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation Response

    Oct 6, 2017 – Vice President and Chief of Staff

    We are always striving to improve our understanding of the long term impact of our higher education grant making. As we continue to improve our processes, we expect all employees to be a part of... More

  8. Helpful (2)

    "Ideal place for people who value work culture"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Arlington, VA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Arlington, VA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Culture. Having experienced bad work cultures, I can say that a work environment that genuinely values culture is extremely rare, but valuable. This approach also encourages greater collaboration, honesty, and, while always a challenge, integration across the organization. In addition, it's hard to identify an employer willing to offer the opportunities for staff to be entrepreneurial and take risks, as long as they are strategic and rooted in the organization's vision and values. I've seen junior staff given the opportunity to oversee projects with large budgets because they came up with a fantastic idea and have comprehensively thought through how it will be executed. This doesn't happen because of cliques or favorites, but because someone has earned it. This type of experience in project management, grant giving or collaborating with other organizations is invaluable for any career. Finally, if you have a bias towards initiative and want to form a concept and then put it into practice, this is an ideal place.

    Cons

    This is both a pro and a con. Some colleagues have come in through the educational programs (pro), but think the culture and opportunities at CKI are typical of any other employer so can be a little entitled (con). This can lead to alienation, cliques, and a creative rumor mill when their ideas aren't swiftly picked-up and embraced by their colleagues. I also worry some staff will have a major wake-up call when they move to a new employer that doesn't value culture. Finally, because CKI is driven by an overarching philosophy it can be extremely frustrating when staff don't live up to those ideals. Senior staff don't just need to all lead but example, but immediately check negative influences.

    Advice to Management

    Culture is critically important and the best part of the organization as it adds to both personal and professional development. However, management really needs to grasp how to mitigate the influence of senior staff who don't view this as an important aspect of the organization.

    Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation Response

    Oct 4, 2017 – Vice President and Chief of Staff

    I appreciate you taking the time to write this review. It’s great to know that you’ve found our culture to be empowering, and one where collaboration, honesty, and entrepreneurship are valued. I also... More


  9. Helpful (15)

    "Vapid, superficial and bureaucratic organization in search of a soul."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Arlington, VA
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Arlington, VA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Free food, little to no supervision. Metro benefits.

    Cons

    1. Rhetoric- CKI likes to talk about mbm and entrepreneurship, but they dont actually use or do any of these things. When I first started, I went around talking to several people who had worked there for years. They all told me about how the "challenge process" was a joke and how they mostly spent all day sitting around surfing the web.

    I came to understand this reality when I asked several members of my own team if they had ever submitted project proposals. They had never submitted a "one pager" despite being there for many years.

    2. Lack of follow through on anything- CKI cannot and will not follow through on anything. Expect that whatever you propose will hang around without a definite yes or no. The "leaders" will either ignore your suggestions or suddenly dump major projects. This place thrives on the status quo. Following through on something would mean having actual results. CKI isn't interested in results. Lack of follow through is CKI's number one guiding principle.

    3. Pay- because results, or actual work are all despised, don't expect your pay to change. They'll do everything they can to make sure no one shines. The whole pay system is a scam. The only way to move up is to move out.

    4. Change is a euphemism- If you hear change, just think layoffs or moving peoples' desks around. Or just know that a large scale project will be cancelled because no one knows how to actually lead the organization.

    5. Bureaucratic- With an organization this ineffective, you need a large bureaucracy to make sure it stays that way.

    6. Culture- the guiding principles are a joke. I saw people let go, underdeveloped, and opportunities to create value ignored. I also found it weird that people were constantly brought in from the outside instead of promoting people from within.

    Another weird tendency is that most people all came from small liberal arts colleges and all believed the same things. what you end up with is a homogeneous culture that tends to be very conservative. It's not a great place if you are a creative; thinking outside of their suffocating box will get you canned.

    7. Pump and dump mentality- CKI doesn't care about creating long term value despite their rhetoric. What they care about is getting as many people as possible in and out of their educational programs. What you get is an empty machine, an organization that no one cares about. And why should anyone care? CKI has no story, no soul. They're only concerned with their next strategy or framework. It's sad.

    8. Leadership- The leaders here have no experience outside of their non profit bubbles. You can learn new skills here, but those gains will be short lived. The leadership lacks exposure to the real world and have been insulated from the reality of the for profit sector. The blind are leading the blind.

    9. Turnover- Don't make too many friends, most will leave. You can probably gather why.

    Advice to Management

    Brian needs to step down. The organization could disappear and no one would even know it was gone. You know that change you guys like to ramble on about? It's time to actually do it. And if you're not willing to do it, then simply shut it down. This movement is about more than the legacy of a billionaire.

    Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation Response

    Nov 2, 2017 – Vice President and Chief of Staff

    Even though you’re no longer with us, we appreciate hearing about your time at our organization. Over the past few years it’s been exciting to see the increased impact our staff is having. Through... More


  10. Helpful (29)

    "Framework for What Exactly?!?"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation full-time

    Pros

    Good Place to Start
     It can be a good place to get your foot in the door. Full-time jobs in the non-profit policy organization world are hard to come by. CKI will employ you for a couple years and not require very much. So make the most of your time by networking, go to grad school during

    Vast Resources
    If you can get leadership's ear, (and get through the bureaucracy) you can do a lot and have unlimited resources.

    Good Benefits
    Good 401k and Healthcare. Match was 6% and a two year vesting period when I was there. Healthcare policy was good as well, especially for non-profits. It helps to have a workforce of childless 20 somethings aka no healthcare costs.

    Relaxed office
     You wont have to worry about staying late to finish a project. There's almost never anything that needs to be done urgently. If you going to grad school part time, take advantage of the slow pace at CKI.

    Libertarian oriented organization
    If you want to sit around all day and talk about politics from a libertarian perspective, this is the perfect job for you.

    Cons

    Risk Adverse
    CKI is extremely risk adverse. The policy of stop, think, and ask is about compliance and keeping its 501c3 status. CKI should be compliant, but compliance is often used as a tool to kill projects and initiative. Want to talk to someone at another organization about a project? Better talk with legal to see if its compliant. People here are paranoid that they might have an uncompliant thought and lose CKI its tax status.

    Ever Changing Strategy and Tactics-
    The Well-being Initiative, Framework for A Free Society, having a coms team, firing the coms team. Trying to do commentary on half a dozen policy areas and doing them poorly. Have you seen any blog posts recently? CKI is part of a broader network of organizations that fundraise twice a year at Koch lead events. The twice-a-year events means there's always a push to have some new strategy to present to get donors excited. As a result, it seems there's a constant change because there needs to be a new pitch to donors. Slow down and stick with one long term strategy. Persistence should be the 11th guiding principle.

    No middle-management
    As weird as it is to praise mid-level management, CKI could use some. The senior management is flies off to Wichita to chat with Charles on what seems like a biweekly basis. As a result, its a bunch of 20 somethings running the show. Senior management either needs to be there and manage people or hire middle management to do so. You cant expect to hire a bunch of people right out of college with little to no experience and give them no guidence. The recruiters constantly talk about how you can make your own job at CKI. Well, maybe managers should do a little more in figuring out what the 22 year old they just hired is doing. You can go for weeks at CKI without having any accountability or people checking up on you.

    Doing Obsure Too Many Things- CKI should focus on doing a few things well. CKI's comparative advantage is that it has a ton of money and a huge network. Because of that, it should focus on grant-making and the educational programs. Stop trying to be a mini think tank. If you must be a think-tank, narrow down to a few issues that resonate with broad swath of the American public. Instead of doing that, CKI has morphed into doing esoteric foreign policy and hosting expensive wasteful events. Example: "What Is A2/AD and Why Does It Matter to the United States?" hosted at the Army Navy country club in DC instead of at CKI's brand new office building with flown-in Italian marble floors that people cant shut up about. (See other reviews for context)

    Advice to Management

    CKI should simply focus on grant-making and educational programs. Those are the two areas it does well and has a comparative advantage in. (See I remembered MBM from the programs!)


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