City University of Seattle Reviews | Glassdoor

City University of Seattle Reviews

Updated March 13, 2017
33 reviews

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3.1
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Richard E. Carter
16 Ratings

33 Employee Reviews

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  1. "Graduate Assistant"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Graduate Assistant in Seattle, WA
    Former Employee - Graduate Assistant in Seattle, WA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at City University of Seattle (More than a year)

    Pros

    People are very easy to work with. Great location, commune, and benefit.

    Cons

    The school is still growing, and it might have limited opportunities in in terms of promoting.


  2. "Great people to work with"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at City University of Seattle full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Great people who care about the success of the university and its students. Education benefits offset low salaries.

    Cons

    No room for growth, low salaries.

    Advice to Management

    Listen to the employees.


  3. Helpful (6)

    "Disappointed"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at City University of Seattle full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    * The biggest pro is working with some very smart people.
    * The ability to telecommute is a pro, especially for employees who have difficulty commuting into downtown Seattle.
    * The Starbucks located in the building.

    Cons

    * Incompetent leaders - far too many people in this organization who do not have the slightest idea how to lead, motivate, coach, and mentor their employees. This fosters a culture of people doing only the minimum in their jobs, rather than addressing performance issues, and recognizing those employees who go above and beyond for their organization.
    * Redundant systems - FAR too many systems in place that are manual, or people-driven, that could easily be automated. Leadership spends a good deal of time looking for ways to squeeze more out of groups of employees, all the while there are jobs here that don't need to exist.
    * Catering to students - we don't say no to students. This isn't always in a student's best interest. Running classes for 1, 2, or 3 students is not only wasteful for the instructor, it is not the best experience for the student. When we do this, we tell the student that they are able to dictate when they will take their classes, rather than stick to a schedule of when the classes are set to be offered.
    * Low pay - I have no idea why any of our adjuncts teach here. City U pays an insanely low amount for instructors, compared to any other institution of higher learning.
    * No recognition of employees - aside from a handful of awards (some of which are given via email), and a holiday party, employees are not recognized for a job well done. This includes little to no feedback from leaders, and communication coming from the top down, often in a condescending manner.

    Advice to Management

    * Listen to your employees. You hire smart people for a reason. Do the smart thing and hear them out, and actually put their ideas into place.
    * Cut the waste out of the system. Get rid of any manual process that can be automated. Move those people to other jobs where their work is actually needed.
    * Pay your faculty a reasonable and fair rate of pay to teach classes. City U students deserve the best faculty, not the ones who are willing to teach for little pay.


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  5. "Whats not to like?"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Principal Faculty in Seattle, WA
    Current Employee - Principal Faculty in Seattle, WA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at City University of Seattle (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    They have no sacred cows or other livestock. To some that may seem like a lack of direction, but execution to a strategy that embraces change management is better than no strategy.

    Cons

    They don't bounce bad people out, if that's really even a con.

    Advice to Management

    Continue the good fight and reward the risk takers, even if their risk was not as successful as hoped for.


  6. Helpful (12)

    "Leadership Needed!!"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Employee in Seattle, WA
    Former Employee - Employee in Seattle, WA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at City University of Seattle full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    The pros are simple: PTO (if you can take it); working with students; working toward a worthy cause and mission; working in a beautiful building downtown; and working with some very good people that put their whole heart into education. These employees work well over their allotted 45 hours a week and keep the doors open. They are amazing and are the reason this place stays open. Others have been demotivated by a lack of leadership, layoffs, low pay, and unequal treatment of employees when it comes to the application of policies (e.g. some are allowed to work from home several days a week, others are told they can only work from home when given permission or submit a form to HR; when arriving to CityU most did not have offices, now male executives and some male directors have office, no females do… these things add up). The result of this is that a majority of employees clock in and out. This doesn’t mean they don’t care or are not good at what they do – they do and are. It means they are burned out on all the cons and on the moral declining for 5+ years and leadership doing nothing about it.

    Cons

    Leadership – They do not understand the true nature of their business and are more focused on being liked by the internal audience and the board then being authentic to what City U is, what City U needs and where City U needs to go.
    Inequality – Policies and practices are not applied equally throughout the university – even between admission departments or academic schools. This causes employees to think that favoritism is happening. In addition to this, females are being given a message that males are more valuable at the executive level. In the last year three males have been hired or promoted to executive positions. No females have been hired at this level. Also, males have offices at the executive level. Females do not. This again, sends a message.
    Low pay – it is a nonprofit and it pays like a nonprofit…
    Heavy Workload – one job is usually equal to two or three or four jobs…which causes a person to burn out or just do one of the jobs and not get the other done…or work overtime and take hold of the opportunity to learn a lot…most employees choose the first option, so several jobs are not being done.
    Business processes – they don’t make sense, cost employees time, cost the the university money, impose on the student experience, and leadership is having employees go through and correct these one by one (with staffing levels the way they are)…rather than pay a professional consultant to correct these processes … while this may work in the long run, in the short run… dollars and experience will continue to see a deficit as a result of these processes.

    Advice to Management

    Demonstrate that you value your people, diversity and leadership by…
    - Rightsizing staffing levels throughout the university according to demand
    - Applying procedures consistently and treating employees fairly
    - Understanding when a job is too large and hiring when needed or cutting expectations based upon where City U is at
    - Increasing opportunities and the total number of women in executive positions


  7. Helpful (2)

    "Great product, service, people, and culture."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at City University of Seattle full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Strong, supportive, invested, experienced, and qualified managers in most all departments
    True leadership sprinkled throughout the organization (find them, let them inspire you)
    Great co-workers, all of whom are qualified to do the work, care deeply for the mission, and there are genuinely good people sprinkled in each department. I love coming to work every day to work with most of these people.
    Amazing tuition benefit
    ORCA subsidy 100%
    Great medical/dental/401k benefits
    Beautiful building downtown with great IT systems and IT team, HR systems, database systems
    Committees on campus make life at work fun
    Professional work environment

    Cons

    The organization is going through a change. The changes seems to be affecting some departments more than others. In my department, I experience very little in terms of these changes. Others are not so lucky. I feel thankful my work experience is such that I truly enjoy it every day. A positive, professional work environment that is invested in my professional growth is of great value to me.
    Some people find that once they hit the ceiling, there is no where else to go.

    Advice to Management

    It is up to you to make the hard decisions. I don't envy that position. Be careful to glean insight about our history and process' from the veteran staff you have, they are probably your most valuable asset. Do not assume that those who came before you were idiots. Be better listeners. Be better communicators. Continue to be transparent. Come up with creative ways to keep morale up. Can we streamline process' to operate more efficiently with less?


  8. Helpful (9)

    "Frustrating change for the worse"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at City University of Seattle full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    My co-workers are, for the most part, hard-working, dependable people who really care about their jobs and the organization. They really want the organization to succeed and thrive.

    Cons

    Unfortunately, the merger with NU has really killed the community "we're all in this together" atmosphere. Nearly everyone I speak with now, no matter what department, feels like their jobs are not as meaningful as before, nor do they feel appreciated or valued. Salaries are ridiculously low - that, coupled with the strained atmosphere in the workplace, seems to have sent most of my co-workers furiously job-hunting. It seems like every week, someone is leaving.

    Advice to Management

    Treat your employees with the respect they deserve and stop taking them for granted. In this improving economy, you cannot pay them bare-bones wages and over-work them and expect them to stay. Get a new "leader" - the current President has alienated most of the employees with his rigid micro-management and unrealistic view of the workforce.


  9. Helpful (7)

    "Struggling to find its place in the changing academic marketplace"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at City University of Seattle full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    The benefits- Health, PTO, tuition benefits are better than 80% of other organizations. I think this is the main reason why some people stay in their positions.
    Coworkers
    Some passionate faculty/instructors that really strengthen their programs: MA Counseling, MEd Guidance and Counseling, School of Leadership
    Job security (for the most part)

    Cons

    poor pay
    benefits slowly change for worse
    poor leadership from top down
    widespread low morale
    Little room for growth
    Constant changes, lack of stability
    New leadership is rigid/90's style of management

    Advice to Management

    No amount of marketing, recruiting, and introductions of new programs will help increase revenue when the university no longer knows the value it offers over other competitors. School is still selling on flexible schedules and online learning for working adults--- It's 2015, every community college, state college and private university now offers the same thing... at a lower cost. So that pitch ain't workin'! Learn from the City? What kind of tag line is that? How does that line resonate with what we offer. Do we offer street smarts? In 2015 competitive organizations offer good benefits, competitive salaries and flexible schedules/remote working when needed to retain top talent. Until CityU figures out what they offer to the customer, why it is different and better than other schools, who their target market is and how to retain top talent they will continue to struggle, blame their employees for that struggle and watch them walk out.


  10. Helpful (3)

    "City University--It doesn't completely suck. Well, maybe a little."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Financial Aid in Seattle, WA
    Current Employee - Financial Aid in Seattle, WA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Steady work; contact with students.

    Cons

    Cheap; too expensive; management can't find their butts with both hands behind their backs.

    Advice to Management

    When someone does a great job and you keep him in a corner doing menial work, he's going to quit. Utilize people's strengths, don't give them busy work.

    City University of Seattle Response

    Dec 4, 2014 – HR Specialist Recruiter

    At CityU we pride ourselves on providing opportunities for our employees to grow. We also pride ourselves on promoting an open door policy which allows our employees to come to management with any ... More


  11. Helpful (3)

    "Unrealistic"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Manager in Seattle, WA
    Current Employee - Manager in Seattle, WA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at City University of Seattle full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    There's some very dedicated staff with extensive experience. Faculty genuinely care for their students.

    Cons

    Lots of stagnant people who have been in positions too long. Zero accountability for follow through from leadership. The partnership with NU had been disastrously implemented. Unrealistic goals for growth compared to internal resources to make it happen. Cross-departmental communication is horrible. Compensation is reprehensible.

    Advice to Management

    Create a training department. Conduct a needs analysis. Do an employee engagement survey. Make the Edison Idea Box anonymous.


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