Contemporary VA Reviews | Glassdoor

Contemporary VA Reviews

Updated 28 Feb 2018

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2.6
37%
Recommend to a Friend
61%
Approve of CEO
Contemporary VA CEO Scott Myers (no image)
Scott Myers
5 Ratings
  1. Helpful (1)

    "Great work from home"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Contractor - Anonymous Contractor 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Contemporary VA

    Pros

    Many people only write reviews about a company that are negative. CVA might have been a mess to work for a couple years ago but now they are great. They cleaned house and got all new upper management they are fantastic. I have see some mixed reviews on here, the interview process was easy for me. I got assigned to an team and begun work the next day on recurring tasks. I love being able to work from home. My hours... are flexible and I am always done by 5pm.

    Show More

    Cons

    Unpaid monthly meeting (this has been brought up in previous post, however they don't tell you thay it is once a month and only an hour long) No insurance - but your an contractor

    Advice to Management

    Y'all are doing great!

    Contemporary VA2018-02-28
  2. "You learn a lot...not all of it is good"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Team Leader and Virtual Assistant 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at Contemporary VA full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    I worked at this company for almost 4 years and while the positives include the amount of skills and training I received, it does not make up for the cons associated with this position.

    Cons

    Even though you are hired as a 1099, you have set work hours, very little flexibility and a GM who tries to micromanage everything being done...including wanting access to your calendar with full details so she can track your day. Overloading VA's with too much work and then being upset when they aren't perfect.

    Advice to Management

    Take a hard look at who you are and change.

    Contemporary VA2017-03-13
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  4. Helpful (2)

    "Work from home, make friends, no benefits"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Contractor - Team Leader in Cleveland, OH
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Contemporary VA for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Virtual Assistants do all kinds of work for clients including WordPress, social media, email marketing, etc. Most work is done during the business day so you have other times off, and you work in teams that help each other out.

    Cons

    employee status is difficult to get, which is the only way to get basic benefits like paid time off and direct deposit.

    Contemporary VA2017-03-04
  5. Helpful (3)

    "Great company in many ways, but...."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Freelancer - Anonymous Freelancer 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Contemporary VA

    Pros

    This is a fantastic place for someone who is just starting out working from home, as they don't necessarily require experience and they put you through a LOT of training. They'll teach you everything you need to know about virtual assisting and digital marketing, etc. You will forget that you are working from home because everyone is constantly communicating all day long through Skype and the internal system. This... can be a good and bad thing, actually. You can seriously learn so much from CVA but there are strings attached...

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    Cons

    In the beginning, you are required to log in every day to their internal system with all of the other newbies, basically all day, and wait for an experienced VA to announce that they have a task available for you to do. Basically, whoever replies first gets the task. There may not be another task available at all after that but you are expected to be there and wait for one, as to not appear uninterested and also... prove that you want to learn. You'll also be expected to attend weekly training/"meetings" of which you will not be paid, but if you do not attend they will use it against you on the review you must score well on to be "promoted" from a newbie to an actual Virtual Assistant and have clients of your own. If you are willing to do that, then you will have no problem. Personally, it was worth it to me to "invest" my time in order to be able to work from home and learn everything I needed to learn. Another thing... after you get promoted to VA after spending maybe a month begging for one 30 minute task a day and you FINALLY have a client - you will be pressured to delegate at least 20% of your new hours that you fought hard to get, to the new people who were hired after you. They sometimes create "contests" to see who can delegate the most work out. I see that as a way for them to pay less because the new people make way less per hour then the VA's who have been promoted, but they want you to think you're this leader/good influence for doing it. Yeah right. You'll basically be scolded if you don't, or considered not a "team player" which will also be used against you when you are up for the next review. There is also the "office politics" that everyone else has already mentioned - but it's true. There are "bullies" and they play favorites big time - management being the worst offenders. If you're lucky, you can be a favorite and you'll be just fine. You can't survive there if you think you can just do a great job and make your clients happy. You'll also need to be aware that when you leave CVA they will "check up" on you to make sure you are not working as a VA anywhere else or have a website of your own (for 2 years upon the day you leave) and if they do, they will send you cease & desist letters threatening to sue you.

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    Advice to Management

    Grow up & stop acting like you're in high school. You've lost a lot of great VA's because of it. You're ruining a really good thing.

    Contemporary VA2016-07-23
  6. Helpful (4)

    "Only If You're Desperate"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Senior Management
     
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at Contemporary VA

    Pros

    Work from home, woman owned and run, good alternative for stay at home mothers, disabled, and students, work with interesting clients

    Cons

    Lack of respect, contractors treated more like employees than independent contractors, have to work the hours set by the company, mandatory unpaid training, contradictory rules and procedures, "internship" contract clause requires you to work minimum 15 months or incur $300 dock in pay

    Advice to Management

    Need to respect the idea of independent contractor, clearly identify job requirements and expectations from the start, be consistent in rewards and penalties

    Contemporary VA2016-07-12
  7. Helpful (1)

    "Solid work from home company"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Contemporary VA full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Supportive work at home environment and plenty of on the job training. CVA provides weekly training opportunities, promotes from within and is very open in communication with all staff members.

    Cons

    Sometimes hard to get as many hours as you want/ are promised.

    Advice to Management

    Management has an open door policy, but the chain of command in the handbook somewhat dampens that policy.

    Contemporary VA2016-06-04
  8. Helpful (3)

    "Avoid at all costs"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - DVA 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Contemporary VA part-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Some of the clients aren't bad and most are con artists. There have been a few I wanted to tell their customers this person is a fraud stop giving them your hard earned money.

    Cons

    I posted a good review previously but after going deeper into the company I saw so many awful things I can't in good concience leave that as my review of the company. What others have said is true Management have a Mean Girls attitude they have a list that if you get on that list you are treated horribly. There is a lot of bullying that goes on and you are basically working as slave labor. It's expected that you... grow your clients despite them not having work for more hours or them not having the money to increase their hours. They constantly talked about core values and home life balance but the problem there was you had to make sure your clients were happy. If your clients had a zillion things for you to do and you worked after hours and on weekends(you won't get overtime either) and you keep your clients happy it's fine, but if you refuse to work after hours and on weekends and your client complains you get in troulble. The pay is awful as well they raised the rates of the clients but they didn't increase the pay of the "contractors" but since they raised the rates of the clients they expect a $40 an hour quality work but you aren't getting paid half of that. You are also expected to be able to do any task that is sent your way even if it's very involved coding that a web developer would be better at doing. They also spout a 10-4-1 social media marketing plan which when it comes down to it is ridiculous. You don't want to be "sharing" other people's content when you could be posting stuff that leads to your business. It is to the point in this sinking ship of a company that there have been a lot of people who have quit. I watched so many people be bullied to the point they are miserable and realize this job isn't worth it. I can tell you it isn't worth it. You can find something else that pays better or at least pays you for the hours you work. There's also the fact that you are treated as an employee but you are only a private contractor. It's also difficult to make employee status because they would end up shelling so much in overtime. I saw so many coworkers working long hours not to mention you are expected to communicate internally and go to trainings which are "not mandatory" (but if you don't go it is marked on your review and will determine if you get a raise or not) in the company for FREE. I have been watching this titanic of a company sink for such a long time. I've watched them push out contractors who have been there for years and I've seen employees only care about themselves. They'll throw you under the bus in a heartbeat if that means they stay on the good side of management. Also if you refuse to listen to mine or anyone else's warnings and do get a job at this company stay in your own little corner. Don't get to know management, keep your head down and keep internal communication to a minimum. This is a sinking ship though so avoid at all costs.

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    Advice to Management

    Grow up and stop acting like teenage girls. Don't try to be everyone's friend as a manager you need to be professional and being friends with your staff means that you will let your personal feelings interfere.

    Contemporary VA2016-06-09
  9. Helpful (8)

    "Run Away For Sanity's Sake"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Contractor - Anonymous Contractor 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Contemporary VA

    Pros

    Working from home is the only positive.

    Cons

    1) They pay $10/h to start but charge clients $40/h 2) Most of their "clients" are borderline con-artists composing business as life coaches. You will be forced to aid in taking vulnerable people's money. Much of that money will be more than what you will make in a year working at CVA. 3) They're based in Delaware, which I'm guessing is how they foot around being able to mandate unpaid monthly... meeting/trainings for independent contractors. Again, UNPAID monthly meetings. The same goes for the legal stipulation in many states which reads that no independent contractor can be in a supervisorial position. 4) The micro-managing. Anything from being berated on their social platform for "not posting" even when they don't bother reading their own thread, in which you posted (yes, they make you join one, then ask you to bump up their dismal FB Page and Twitter numbers by liking those pages too), to management gang-ups if you are asked to take on more than you feel able and say no (remember, you're an independent contractor, being able to say no is part of the benefits of being an independent contractor, and you should expect to be bullied for it). 5) Unorganized communications. Much of your day will be going back and forth between their emails, skype groups, and social platform, all of this communication is also unpaid. Any pressure from management is sure to come in the form of a Skype meeting so they cannot have their tactics of subtle bullying in writing. Unless you ask to have your meetings done on a recordable medium like webex, they will report to the board using any white washing editing they wish. 6) You're basically a virtual day laborer. Until you get a client (and even after), you will basically be sitting on a corner waiting for the task truck to arrive and throw you a bone. 7) You will work more than you are able to bill. They have no company standards for how much tasks take, so people delegating work out can ask you to edit 7 hour long videos in 7 hours or make 20 Pinterest graphics in one hour. Obviously these tasks will take longer but you are simple expected to eat up whatever is left. Work 30 hours, get paid for 15. 8) If you're a person of color, do not expect to be promoted past VA or Team Leader to a actual employee position (rather than independent contractor), management's a white's only club. 9) When you leave (when I left, they had lost 6 VA's, some who were there for years, because of many of these abuses), they will take whatever pay they owe you. Their contract holds you liable for anything they deem losses, even if that's work you completed to client satisfaction a three weeks before you give in a two-week notice. .... They also have a non-competition clause to not work for anyone like them for 2 years, but did you really need a 10th reason? Just don't work here. There are other VA companies. Lastly, when you leave, you will get a letter from their CEO, who will not make an appearance otherwise, about your non-competition agreement how they've had to file legal actions against people who have spilled their "secrets" in the past. Kind of like how an abuser doesn't want their victim telling others about the abuse. The truth is because they control their "subcontractors" so much, with training, mandatory unpaid meetings, procedures, expectations, supervision, and management, they are in clear violation of federal labor laws. They are dodging taxes by hiring freelancers but treating them and monitoring their hours like employees. Or, more specifically "The Supreme Court has said that there is no definition that solves all problems relating to the employer-employee relationship under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The Court has also said that determination of the relation cannot be based on isolated factors or upon a single characteristic, but depends upon the circumstances of the whole activity. The goal of the analysis is to determine the underlying economic reality of the situation and whether the individual is economically dependent on the supposed employer. In general, an employee, as distinguished from an independent contractor who is engaged in a business of his own, is one who "follows the usual path of an employee" and is dependent on the business that he serves. The factors that the Supreme Court has considered significant, although no single one is regarded as controlling are: (1) the extent to which the worker's services are an integral part of the employer's business (examples: Does the worker play an integral role in the business by performing the primary type of work that the employer performs for his customers or clients? Does the worker perform a discrete job that is one part of the business' overall process of production? Does the worker supervise any of the company's employees?); (2) the permanency of the relationship (example: How long has the worker worked for the same company?); (3) the amount of the worker's investment in facilities and equipment (examples: Is the worker reimbursed for any purchases or materials, supplies, etc.? Does the worker use his or her own tools or equipment?); (4) the nature and degree of control by the principal (examples: Who decides on what hours to be worked? Who is responsible for quality control? Does the worker work for any other company(s)? Who sets the pay rate?); (5) the worker's opportunities for profit and loss (examples: Did the worker make any investments such as insurance or bonding? Can the worker earn a profit by performing the job more efficiently or exercising managerial skill or suffer a loss of capital investment?); and (6) the level of skill required in performing the job and the amount of initiative, judgment, or foresight in open market competition with others required for the success of the claimed independent enterprise (examples: Does the worker perform routine tasks requiring little training? Does the worker advertise independently via yellow pages, business cards, etc.? Does the worker have a separate business site?)." I fully intend on reporting them.

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    Advice to Management

    Please fire yourselves and get new management. Also, it wouldn't hurt to have some diversity in your management team, so it doesn't look like the Plastics table in Mean Girls.

    Contemporary VA2016-02-22
  10. Helpful (5)

    "Isn't worth the hassle or mistreatment due to showing favoritism towards some."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Contractor - Project Virtual Assistant 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Contemporary VA for less than a year

    Pros

    I actually thought this was a great company to work for at first.

    Cons

    Termination for no valid reason without even asking employee or investigating Team leaders lie to cover their own tracks Terminated in the middle of completing a project that I was told wasn't completed 3 days later Favoritism showed to certain individuals Even with me notifying team leader of my every move, I was told I wasn't available enough or notifying her of my availability. They dismissed the ones that... actually work and kept them notified of their every move but the ones that never speak up or say anything in team chat are still there. I'm seeking legal counsel regarding this matter and starting my own company

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    Advice to Management

    Please get the details from both sides before just terminating people for no valid reason. It was already bad enough sitting around for hours waiting on work and then get terminated because of she-say in the middle of doing a task for no pay.

    Contemporary VA2015-04-03
  11. Helpful (5)

    "Lots of hoops to jump through"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Contractor - Project Virtual Assistant 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook

    I worked at Contemporary VA for less than a year

    Pros

    The opportunity to work from home is always nice, and the pay rate, while low, is better than you're likely to be offered from lowball bidding sites. Also, the work-related emails and messages tend to come mostly during standard business hours.

    Cons

    Lots of hoops to jump through before you get hired, and then even once you have been offered and signed a contract you still have to undergo lengthy mandatory unpaid training and attend numerous mandatory unpaid meetings. The pay, assuming you ever get the chance to actually work "on the clock", is actually at the low end of the spectrum for similar agencies.

    Advice to Management

    Mandatory unpaid training, once a contract has been signed, is actually a violation of federal employment law, whether or not you claim it's part of some kind of extended hiring process.

    Contemporary VA2014-10-24
Found 12 reviews