DeVry Education Group Reviews | Glassdoor

DeVry Education Group Reviews

Updated August 11, 2017
424 reviews

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3.1
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Lisa Warner Wardell
2 Ratings

424 Employee Reviews

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Pros
Cons
  • No room for growth within this company and the organization is going through multiple lay-offs (in 10 reviews)

  • No focus on people anymore just on the CIO looking good to upper management with bogus made up metrics (in 15 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Helpful (8)

    "Bring back Dennis Keller!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Professor in Chicago, IL
    Current Employee - Professor in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Faculty have lots of opportunity to telecommute. The health insurance is fairly generous. I work with some GREAT people locally. I have plenty of time away from the office to look for other work.

    Cons

    Many people in senior management have no experience in education prior to coming to the company, except as students. That would be acceptable, but only if those people weren't also making decisions that had significant impact on academic standards, operations, and personnel. Most employees feel senior management does not trust them. Local management is required to micromanage professionals with over twenty years of experience, and it's insulting. Three rounds of layoffs in the last four years, and now they want to be an "employer of choice"!??

    Advice to Management

    Take the company private, so you can stop looking for the next big scheme to meet Wall Street's quarterly expectations. Let people do their jobs and stop trying to tell them how - it will result in greater innovation, satisfaction, and retention of students and employees. Reduce the level of administrative bloat at the corporate office - it's grown tremendously over the last four years. Create a long-term tuition structure that provides educational value, and shareholder value will follow.


  2. Helpful (3)

    "DeVry is headed in the wrong direction."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Kansas City, MO
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Kansas City, MO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Benefits are the only reason to work for DeVry.

    Cons

    The only way to advance at DeVry is to start out in sales/admissions. Communication is virtually non-existent. Corporate communications are pro-company propaganda of little substance. Employee morale is awful. Both corporate and local management make you feel like a failure no matter what you do. Recognition programs are gimmicky and do not truly reward hard work. Senior leadership is running DeVry into to ground by laying off senior faculty, overworking staff, focusing on the bottom dollar rather than education, and raising tuition all the while. Daniel Hamburger has no respect for humans, more or less his employees.

    Advice to Management

    Stop laying of senior faculty. Remember that education is your product, and you cannot deliver it without faculty. Invest in your workforce. Listen to your workforce.

  3. Helpful (8)

    "They used to be a real college"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Full-Time Substitute Teacher (fully Promoted Faculty) in Oak Brook, IL
    Current Employee - Full-Time Substitute Teacher (fully Promoted Faculty) in Oak Brook, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Benefits are better than average. Pay is OK, but used to be better before they started giving out extra work without extra pay. I work with some truly talented and committed people in my department.

    Cons

    -Forcing employees to take on extra duties without the extra compensation that used to be attached. Policy changes have taken about $20,000 out of my pocket over the last three years, and my situation's fairly typical at my campus.
    -Minimal pay raises while the CEO's total cash compensation grows by 30% per year.
    -Micromanagement - they used to tell you what they needed done and then got the hell out of your way so you could do it. Now, it's, "Do this, this way, with these tools, this many times, and give me regular reports about it. Wait! We're changing it. You need to do it this way starting three weeks from now even though we don't have anything ready for you to work with."
    -Employee evaluations have been reduced to a checkbox matrix that doesn't begin to measure quality of work.
    -Faculty who don't want to cancel class in order to attend the awards ceremony for the company's big recognition program have that recognition taken away.
    -Colleagues were forced to take a personal day when they didn't attend the campus Christmas party that was held on a day they weren't scheduled to teach.
    -Employee communications are little more than re-hashed press releases trying to get the rank and file to buy into this week's big lie.
    -Short-sighted senior management. Cut costs now. Boost revenues now. Where's the long-term strategy? The only thing left to prop up the share price is to start closing campuses. I look for that to happen soon.
    -Bloated senior management. For a company run by MBAs, it sure doesn't know how to implement a "flat" corporate structure. We have a corporate Vice President of Real Estate, among the dozens of other senior managers that have come on board over the last three years.
    -Each new senior manager has a pet project that must be implemented yesterday, and so we have about eight "burning imperatives" and twelve other key initiatives in the pipeline, each with its own forgettable acronym.
    -A system-wide information security initiative that hasn't required us to change our passwords for the ERP since we implemented the damn thing five years ago.
    -Promotions come largely to those whose noses are buried farthest up the posteriors of the people above them on the chain of command. Why else would they hire someone without a PhD to be the system-wide Dean of Curriculum and Instruction?
    -Over half of all incoming students need remedial courses, and nearly 2/3 of those don't last a year. Have you ever tried to deal with people who can't calculate integers or identify the topic sentence of a paragraph? Welcome to our world.
    -As one colleague who took the buyout in 2007 said, "They used to be a real college." Not any more.

    Advice to Management

    Daniel, you said after the layoffs in 2007 that most of the people who were let go wouldn't have been hired if their positions were open at the time. Many employees would not take their current positions if they were open today. Those who remain largely fall into four categories:
    1. Trapped, because they couldn't approach their current pay working anywhere else
    2. Actively looking, but haven't yet found anything approaching their current level of pay
    3. Riding it out to see how much longer it takes you to drive the company into the ground
    4. Those figuring out whose ass to kiss in order to get promoted


  4. Helpful (3)

    "It was a job that paid my bills..."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Admissions Advisor in Naperville, IL
    Former Employee - Admissions Advisor in Naperville, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Had some really great co-workers.

    Cons

    Myself and my past co-workers literally celebrated the day they were fired or finally landed a new job with another company. We all came from the Online division as admissions advisors. It’s the type of sales job you would get as your 1st sales job out of college. You soon find out just how conniving their recruitment practices are and what you have to do in order to “make a sale” rather than honestly, and truthfully recruit a prospective student into a good school with a solid education.

    The way the hierarchy works around there is based on numbers, not experience. If you meet and/or exceed your numbers consistently, you’ll be moved up the sales scale whether or not you even deserve or have the experience and know-how to be a manager. Which means, management is downright horrible because they have no idea what they’re doing. The only thing they know to do is micro-manage you and hound you over and over again about numbers and do everything they can do to get their team to meet their goal so they don’t get yelled at in management meetings. Overtime is not an option. It’s a demand and you’re not paid overtime for it as you’re a salary paid employee. If you don’t work on the weekends, you’re blacklisted and sent nasty emails from managers about how disappointed they are that you didn’t come in. It’s not a 40 hr work week, it’s more like 60-70. So again, it’s good for those fresh out of college as a first job, not at all for those who have a family as you will not be spending a whole lot of time with them.

    Don’t ever think about or consider approaching your manager as a manager. Discussing any personal issues is just juicy gossip for them to spread. It’s also even difficult to go to HR and make a complaint and remain anonymous.

    Believe me, I’m not a disgruntled employee. While I was there, just like any employee, I had my highs and lows. Pay wasn’t the worst, and benefits were pretty standard if not below. I just needed a job and found this to work for the time being. I started in one department, decided to give admissions a try and quickly saw what the company was about and decided it was time for me to prepare my departure. I did what I had to do to get by day to day, and due to poor sales #’s was let go (which is typically the reason for all those let go as Admissions has the highest turn-over as it is a sales job).

    Once you start working for a new company after working here, your eyes are opened even more in realizing just how badly DeVry runs their management and business. Their practices are NOT normal. Every co-worker I’ve spoken to that has worked there, cannot believe how wonderful and amazing life is for them now that they’re not working there, and how they can’t believe they were sucked into believing that working at DeVry, is really how corporate American is…. When it’s not at all close to it. It’s a prison.

    Advice to Management

    Rather that simply "promoting" advisors to ADA or DA based on their numbers, if you feel a particular person would make a good ADA or DA, put them through management and confidentiality training.

    Also - do not rush the hiring process. Make sure one's background check clears and they are a safe employee to have in your workplace BEFORE offering them the job. Identify thieves and pedophiles are probably not suitable to work with such sensitive information.


  5. Helpful (5)

    "Unorganized"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Naperville, IL
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Naperville, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Flexible with time off
    Good Benefits

    Cons

    Huge lack of communication
    Lack of serious career advancement
    Laughable management practices
    Quantity over quality
    Department bias

    Advice to Management

    Communication, communication, and communication


  6. Helpful (4)

    "High Stress no work life balance"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Manager in Oak Brook, IL
    Former Employee - Manager in Oak Brook, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at DeVry Education Group full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Good Benefits. Good opportunities to learn.

    Cons

    1. 60-80 hour expected work weeks in IT.
    2. Little appreciation for "extra" work as 60-80 hours becomes expected
    3. No prioritization process as everything has to be done.
    4. Lack of management support
    5. Toxic talking behind people's back environment to promote individual's and individual's agenda.
    6. High continuous turnover.

    Advice to Management

    you will get what you sow. I'd encourage some solid management development philosophies on people management and team building. Managing by fear is not an endearing philosophy and can not be sustained.


  7. Helpful (9)

    "Micromanagement and lack of opportunity"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Admissions Advisor in Naperville, IL
    Former Employee - Admissions Advisor in Naperville, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at DeVry Education Group full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Enjoyed co-workers
    Matched the 401K
    Health Insurance and Paid personal days and holidays

    Cons

    Management does not develop its human capital. Management does not work with employees to reconcile personal goals with the organizational goals to increase productivity and profitability. My department was a machine and the employee was/is a small cog caught in the daily minutia of unimportant tasks dictated to them which they must adhere to in order to keep his/her job.

    Advice to Management

    Perhaps you may reconsider the value of the human being, the mind, one's capabilities, and creativity. This is hard to do once everyone is turned into a mechanical cog in the micromanaged management box.

  8. Helpful (4)

    "The dark years."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Team Lead in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Team Lead in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at DeVry Education Group full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    I learned a lot about myself and my goals, and I now know what kind of company culture I want a future with. However, I learned these through my difficult experiences at DeVry and not through it's nurturing treatment or positive development.

    Cons

    Far too many dissatisfied employees, they sabotage themselves and conspire to do their worst after only a few months on the job. The leaders are not setting the right example either. I actually had an HR rep who hired her family members without disclosing the relationship. Made evaluating or defending your evaluation of an employee much more difficult when their family member was also their HR rep.

    Advice to Management

    Your Directors and Assistant Directors of Admissions managers are often too inexperienced and too poorly trained in how to develop employee talent. They are thrown right into the job of making numbers work, but never taught how to do so, and everyone seems surprised when a target is missed or if a team is completely dissatisfied. No manager should hit the floor without an intense management training that lasts a month. Also, you make it too hard for the real talent to ascend or stick around.


  9. Helpful (4)

    "Horrible company!!!!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Student Finance Representative in Naperville, IL
    Former Employee - Student Finance Representative in Naperville, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at DeVry Education Group full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    You get a FREE Devry education aka waste of time !

    Cons

    Waste of time working at Devry

    Advice to Management

    Look into hiring grown adults, not kids!!


  10. "Devry is a horrible place to work in. The culture of the company is not conducive."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Student Services Representative/Specialist II Registrar Services in Naperville, IL
    Former Employee - Student Services Representative/Specialist II Registrar Services in Naperville, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at DeVry Education Group full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    At one point, Devry would have outings for the employees that were somewhat enjoyable. The best part of the outings is that you would get to leave early.

    Cons

    Devry does not provide opportunity for growth, advancement, or upper movement within or around the company. Management often has favorites who are allowed to lead projects. There is constant micromanaging among management. The salary is the lowest in comparison with other colleges and universities. Managers are often unpleasant and unprofessional, and there have ben quite a few incidences of bullying and harassment on the part of managers and colleagues. When the bullying is brought to the attention of human resources, they just brush it under the rug and do nothing to make improvements or protect the employees.

    The software and systems that Devry utilizes never work and often shutdown around the busiest times (usually right before and at the very beginning of each session). In addition to issues with the software, people aren't properly trained and are given unrealistic deadlines for projects. The environment is highly competitive when there is not much room for advancement. Due to massive layoffs, employees are now required to work mandatory overtime which is unfair and taxing.

    Advice to Management

    Devry could be an awesome place to work if corporate management implemented a culture in which they actually cared about the well being of its employees instead of the profit. Devry is profit driven and is not a company that is loyal to its employees whatsoever.


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