Dermatology Foundation Reviews | Glassdoor

Dermatology Foundation Reviews

Updated August 3, 2017
3 reviews

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  1. Helpful (5)

    "Do Not Work Here"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend

    I worked at Dermatology Foundation full-time

    Pros

    The pay rate is good (at least as far as I could tell - I never learned what anyone else was paid), and I was very excited to start as a relatively recent college graduate. This job taught me that even a lot of money cannot always make up for a truly terrible job.

    Cons

    There is absolutely no training, yet you are expected to know the ins and outs of their personalized database within a matter of days. The office decor is straight out 1992, the office itself is quiet and demoralizing, and if you so much as start a conversation with a coworker at the coffee pot, the Executive Director will stare at you both until you return to your desks.

    If you do something right, it will most likely be unacknowledged. If it is acknowledged, you will most likely be called by the wrong name.

    If you do something wrong, the Executive Director will directly question your competence, your capabilities and your personal character. Even if this mistake was made in your first week on the job.

    I left after two months, and on my last day it was revealed to me that the Executive Director had gone through my desk while I was out and read my personal notes. When I confronted her about this, she told me that I owned nothing at that desk and everything was the property of the Dermatology Foundation.

    If you would like a dramatized version management's behavior, please watch the movie "The Devil Wears Prada."

    Advice to Management

    Train your employees, listen to what they have to say, update your website, stop acting as though every little problem is the end of the world.


  2. Helpful (6)

    "Extreme Micromanaging, Historically Constant Turnover"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    Pros

    There truly are none. It was astonishing to see just how short of time each non-management person was there.

    Cons

    Micromanaging to the hilt. The entire small office was under siege at all times by a controlling management team - you would be questioned if you got up to get a glass of water. Every process was dated - like fax machine and US mail dated with no intention of getting up to speed. The management reply to everything basically stemmed from an irrational paranoia. It was bad.

    Advice to Management

    Look for best practice advice when trying new things. Try to look at why there has been a record of excessive turnover/relying on temps from an outside professional viewpoint - even hire it done to figure out why you are not able to keep even a single employee long than a year or so.

  3. "This organization does not deserve you"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook

    I worked at Dermatology Foundation full-time

    Pros

    The view of downtown Evanston from the office is lovely; you can network with Rotary people downstairs during your lunch break and hope they hire you instead

    Cons

    To be fair, I worked for the DF for 6 months between 2006 and 2007, so it’s been a while, although it appears based on the other review that nothing has changed, including the Executive Director and her Deputy. They were the two coldest people I’ve worked with – ever – and have an air of self-importance about them that is puzzling given that a) this is academic dermatology, aka not academic cardiology or orthopedic surgery (which is to say, something a bit more prestigious in the medical community) and b) the organization is not that well known in the derm community. Take a look at how many dermatologists exist and the percentage that are members. Get over yourselves, ladies. As the other reviewer said, not only are you not trained whatsoever on the job and tasks at hand, you are belittled for mistakes. God forbid you try to bring any joy into the office. I once was asked to call the Evanston Post Office and demand why we were not receiving mail. (Maybe because no one had sent any?!) My family and I still joke about this place 10 years later. Lessons learned include: believe in yourself and do not doubt what you can contribute, even if you are made to feel otherwise. I was told that I really needed to figure out what I wanted in my career (I was 24!); guess what, DF? I did, thanks to my experience there. I learned not to suffer in a job for the paycheck and joined the Peace Corps, which led to a master’s degree and a job for an international non-profit overseas. I also learned how to be a supportive supervisor based on doing the opposite of what I observed there.

    Advice to Management

    It will fall on deaf ears, as it apparently has for as long as the Executive Director has been in power, but take a real look at how you’re treating staff and why they’re constantly leaving. (How has the Board of Directors not cared about this either?) At some point the onus falls on you as an organization to improve, as you can’t blame this record turnover on the literally dozens, if not hundreds of people that have walked into those doors. A little less arrogance on your end would do a long way.