Disney Parks & Resorts "magic" Reviews | Glassdoor

Disney Parks & Resorts Employee Reviews about "magic"

Updated Oct 26, 2019

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3.8
72%
Recommend to a Friend
70%
Approve of CEO
Disney Parks & Resorts CEO Robert A. Iger
Robert A. Iger
1,095 Ratings
Pros
  • "The atmosphere of magic and opportunities to advance your career(in 270 reviews)

  • "Disney is a great place to learn about working in a large company that for the most part cares about its cast members(in 263 reviews)

Cons
  • "Long hours and sporadic scheduling(in 272 reviews)

  • "You must cozy up to cast members/your manager to get a cast role(in 214 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

Reviews about "magic"

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  1. "College Program Cast Member"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Anaheim, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Disney Parks & Resorts full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Disney perks are great. You can get three people in at a time 16 times per year. The cast members were great. The pay wasn’t bad. There was always time to swap or give shifts away. As a cast member you can go into the park whenever you want essentially!

    Cons

    You spend all the money you make in the parks. It’s really hard to advance in the company unless you have been there forever, you can get expanded roles pretty easily though. Also it really is not a family company. I experienced so many cool things, but the family was not allowed to experience the backstage magic.

    Disney Parks & Resorts2019-10-27
  2. "Overseas Echange Programme"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Intern - Anonymous Intern in Orlando, FL
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Disney Parks & Resorts for less than a year

    Pros

    Going to work is like entering a Disney movie. The sights and sounds are magical, people are (for the most part) in a good mood, and you would get to see other colleagues who have been in the company longer, create magical moments for guest, inspiring your to excel at customer service. Living spaces are provided, with all your basic needs mets. The commute to work can be anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour, depending on which park or resort you work at. There are multiple superviors you would be working, whom I believe deserve the position they hold.

    Cons

    Work is always scheduled at 40 hours a week. Nothing more nothing less. Management would not allow you to work overtime so as to save themselves the added costs.

    Disney Parks & Resorts2019-10-26
  3. "Love Disney, Love the job"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Attractions Cast Member in Anaheim, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I worked at Disney Parks & Resorts part-time for more than a year

    Pros

    -Exciting daily opportunities to make magic

    Cons

    -Long hours during holidays and probation

    Disney Parks & Resorts2019-10-01
  4. "Good Company, Scam Program"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Intern - Specialty Beverage H/H in Orlando, FL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Disney Parks & Resorts for less than a year

    Pros

    Disney takes care of their cast members and is a fun and engaging place to work. Making magic for guests is a pleasure. There are good benefits, even for the Disney College Program participants.

    Cons

    However, the cons outweigh the pros for the College Program. Rent is taken out of our paychecks weekly (around $100-$200 each week depending on the apartment) and we are only guaranteed 30 hours a week at $12 an hour or less. It's not a financially viable opportunity if you have any bills whatsoever. Because we are interns, we get the worst shifts no one wants and are paid less than full timers doing the same exact work. There's "classes" and tours they offer the interns, but they are hardly worth it and often occur during working hours.

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    Disney Parks & Resorts2019-09-30
  5. "Hard work but priceless experiences"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Intern - Merchandise in Orlando, FL

    I worked at Disney Parks & Resorts for more than a year

    Pros

    - Meeting people from all over the world - Receiving the best guest service training - Making magic - Disney family

    Cons

    - Long hours - Constantly changing schedule

    Disney Parks & Resorts2019-08-21
  6. "Grossly Underpaid"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Disney Parks & Resorts part-time for less than a year

    Pros

    You get “free” admissions to the parks (does not include the water parks). I quote free because at $12/hour it feels as if ya were actually paying a hefty premium for the annual pass. On the flip side, you get to create magical moments for many people.

    Cons

    Did I mention they underpay cast members? Well, as if that wasn’t enough, how much they care about their cast members is inversely proportional to how much they care about cast members. This truly is a “the guest is always right” kind of place. So much so that they will unapologetically put guests over cast members. Miscommunication is the order of the day and unnecessary drama is the name of the game. Poor leadership will frustrate you at every step.

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    Disney Parks & Resorts2019-08-30
  7. "it's tough"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Intern - Disney College Program 

    I worked at Disney Parks & Resorts

    Pros

    magic, free, (nice) guests, perks

    Cons

    pay, rent, hours, transportation, (mean) guests

    Disney Parks & Resorts2019-08-26
  8. "A Fantastic Company with Amazing Coworkers"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Guest Relations Hostess 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Disney Parks & Resorts full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Super Friendly Cast Members, Great Benefits, Working Hands-On with Guests in the Parks, Creating Magic

    Cons

    Fluctuating Hours, Sometimes-Stressful Guest Situations

    Disney Parks & Resorts2019-07-11
  9. "Loved my time with Disney!!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Intern - Internship 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Disney Parks & Resorts for less than a year

    Pros

    I love the perks, the Florida sun, the magic you make for the guest. Also love the feeling of community that goes with working for the community.

    Cons

    Leaders can be tricky sometimes because they have a lot of pressure for us to preform at 100% all the time. I think sometimes they forget we are people who have real feelings.

    Disney Parks & Resorts2019-06-25
  10. "Chipped Away at the Magic Until There Was Almost Nothing Left"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Disney Vacation Club (DVC) Advance Sales Associate in Orlando, FL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Disney Parks & Resorts full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Many people I worked with genuinely cared about Guests. Sometimes, ASAs are even able to create small, memorable, “magical moments” for Guests. And while the price I paid for working for The Walt Disney Company chipped away at the magic for me, at least I know I was able to create a little magic for my Guests.

    Cons

    I share the following perspective having not only worked for DVC, but having received top performer recognition and having been promoted to next-tier teams. Guests who visit Disney frequently and spend thousands of dollars on a single vacation might do well to consider DVC. The Advance Sales Associate (ASA) role gives an opening to Guests who might be interested in further exploring DVC. However, significant inventory problems exist. Many Guests approach you because they are unable to book a desired room even almost a year in advance. Some Guests had their desired rooms switched by Disney at the last minute. The ASA is thereby recommending a product that has known inventory issues. DVC marketing materials might lead you to believe otherwise, and you won’t see many inventory complaints online. For example, on Facebook, DVC (or any other company) may delete or hide complaints at their own discretion. I was made aware of Guest frustration with inventory, and I became increasingly uncomfortable recommending the product. Also, annual dues increase each year, and some privileges are cut over time (search “DVC pool hopping” for one example). Of the corporations I’ve worked for, I’ve never experienced more ineffective leadership than at The Walt Disney Company. The environment harkens back a few generations to a “command & control” environment, and hasn’t evolved. That means lip service from leaders and no real leadership or inspiration (unless satisfying shareholders counts). Neither front-level supervisors nor higher-level leaders for the ASA role truly listen to Cast Member concerns (despite a “we listened” campaign that occasionally selects one suggestion — usually an easy lift — implements a quick solution, and touts it as evidence that Cast Members are heard). Leader-to-ASA meetings have a one-sided agenda from the leader. Even worse, weekly all-staff meetings are generally used to berate all Cast Members for the shortcomings of a few. These weekly meetings are psychologically interesting. They’ll typically start with a leader declaring that the meeting will be inspirational, and then proceed to deflate people. Other indications of poor leadership are leaders’ lack of response to communications from Cast Members, playing favorites (I’ve personally seen individuals start at the ASA level & get quickly promoted to a Sales Guide role, while those who have put much into their ASA jobs & routinely deliver results get passed over for Guide roles), and double-speak (ASAs are told to “be Disney first” to Guests while also receiving e-mails from leaders recommending the ASA calculates how much money they want to make for the month and using that as a motivator to book tours). Leaders have proven to be rigid. ASAs are sometimes pitted against one another due to overstaffing a kiosk with light Guest traffic. Schedule adjustments are not allowed (despite the fact there is typically a several-hour overlap as one ASA ends their shift and another begins. ASAs are not permitted to leave early, for example, even without pay). Finally, most ASAs have great, average, and underperforming months in terms of booking tours. For the underperforming months, ASAs are given “performance memos” and eventually downgraded to a lower-tier team. To avoid being downgraded and to ensure their ratio of worked days to sales remains high, a good portion of ASAs call out sick at the end of each month. The system is flawed, and constant pressure to make and exceed goals is a culprit. A similar situation unfolded in recent years at Wells Fargo, unleashing a toxic environment. That should be all that DVC Leadership needs to see to change the culture.

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    Disney Parks & Resorts2019-07-27
Found 308 reviews