KEY NOT FOUND: coverImgAlt
Logo

Duke Energy

Is this your company?

Duke Energy

Add a Review

Duke Energy Employee Reviews about "benefit"

Updated Aug 15, 2022

To filter reviews, or .

Found 11 of over 1,711 reviews

3.9
77%
Recommend to a Friend
80%
Approve of CEO
Duke Energy President and Chief Executive Officer Lynn J. Good
Lynn J. Good
614 Ratings

Top Review Highlights by Sentiment

Pros
  • "Good Benefits and that’s it(in 210 reviews)
  • "Good pay and the people at the sight where very friendly(in 138 reviews)
  • "great people to work with(in 101 reviews)
  • "Duke Energy has a good work life balance and is fairly stable.(in 61 reviews)
  • "Great job security.(in 35 reviews)
Cons
Pros & Cons are excerpts from user reviews. They are not authored by Glassdoor.

Ratings by Demographics

This rating reflects the overall rating of Duke Energy and is not affected by filters.

Want more demographic options?

Reviews about "benefit"

Return to all Reviews
  1. 2.0
    Former Employee

    Demanding & toxic environment

    Mar 25, 2022 - Call Center Customer Service Supervisor 
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    Benefit were reasonable. Pension was an option when I started.

    Cons

    Hiring process rushed and accepting applicants that didn't have much work ethic. High turnover among new hires. Work environment is very toxic among leadership. Not much support or development for those in leaderships within this department.

    1 person found this review helpful
  2. 4.0
    Former Employee

    Good

    Feb 14, 2018 - Anonymous Employee 
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    Good pay and good benefit.

    Cons

    Business runs each one in silo, not tech savvy.

    2 people found this review helpful
  3. 1.0
    Former Employee, more than 1 year

    Ready to be nothing more than a glorified retail worker? This place is for you!

    Oct 1, 2020 - Engineering Technologist in Greensboro, NC
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    This review is for engineering within Distribution. Transmission/Nuclear/etc. need not worry about ever having any real issues, as they get to mostly stay away from customers. - the paycheck never bounced - OK starting vacation hours, until you quickly realized its never enough to get you away from the wretched place along with permanently never being able to catch up with work projects - place does give out an actual bonus around mid-March, though the percentage you get stems from some questionable in-house statistics... - surprisingly OK healthcare options, although that leads into a con of you automatically get enrolled with their base healthcare option UNLESS you purposely elect to not take their healthcare option. Makes sense? Not at Duke. - An assortment of coworkers who are always ready and willing to share the misery with you, because everyone eventually realizes what a dead-end being in engineering in Distribution really is. Unless brown is the favorite color to paint your nose with! - Discounts that are either only marginally useful or only helpful if you're in certain locations. Better luck next time if you're stuck in a small office and can't transfer with the "good ole boys" in Charlotte! - I've heard it's a good name to have on the resume, but I'm ready to be able to permanently take it off the resume in a couple years. - Remote working was a useful option, but it quickly turns into a con once you realize it actually means they expect you to be able to respond to inquiries/update projects 24/7. Turns your home space into a dystopian nightmare once you open up the laptop/work phone and see you missed several calls for inane questions that you will never be able to catch up on. - "Flexible" hours, not a very set schedule but that seems to be office-dependent. Also feeds into the "pro" above with the remote work option, hidden expectation to always be ready 24/7. - The best pro is when you leave the dead-end line of work this really is, and realize there is more to life than bending at the knee to needy demanding people who will never be satisfied no matter how efficient and correct your work is. Does feed into the last pro though... - Best pro lesson learned here, is how to prioritize. Time management is not an actual concept you can ever embrace here due to how inefficient both the company and clients are as a whole but learning to prioritize will save your sanity. You quickly learn that project efficiency and cost-effectiveness + long term reliability and safety are the ways to go, not bending over for the crying client who thinks touting that they've "put up with Duke for over 30 years" and "I've never had to provide this in my life for these projects until now" are going to do anything for them. Management sees that in reverse order though, as you will continuously find out in your simulated prison sentence masquerading as the Distribution engineering department.

    Cons

    You can pretty much sum up any and all cons for this place as the 'typical Dilbert comic style outdated corporate environment' but let us explore some pain points below. You'll also notice I don't use the word 'customer' here, because working in this company has made me cringe at that phrase. At Duke, you're just another number. - Lack of communication and cooperation between departments, treating every department as an individual 'silo' and people wonder why things don't get done. I learned one of my favorite phrases in this job that I'll say in a different way here: Too many coaches, not enough players. Too many cooks spoil the broth. You get the picture, everyone has their useless input in the email chain when something goes wrong but nobody wants to take action and accept responsibility. So they dump the problem on engineering! Leads into the next con... - Lack of initiative and responsibility on most everyone outside of engineering. Facing a difficult client that asks a tough question such as 'when will the service to the house get turned on'? Dump it over to engineering. Found a broken wooden pole in the field that should've been fixed by the linemen instead of sending it somewhere else for a work order to be made up? Send to engineering. Physical material not show up for the job or is incorrect despite the list of materials showing what should actually be there? No, don't contact corporate trucking or supply chain. Instead, contact engineering, who has an even smaller amount of control than the person contacting them about the problem. Engineering is the Dumping Ground for when you have a problem you do not want to deal with, and you frequently turn into just being a middle-man for calling people. - Everyone (inside and outside the organization!) thinks engineering has much more control over the full project than they actually do. No, engineering does not schedule the work. No, engineering does not pick the material from the yard and bring it to the site or load it onto the material handler trucks. No, engineering does not have an estimated time the linemen will get there to start work, nor do they supervise the linemen and know the schedule. No, engineering does not exactly know where anything is buried. The scope of the engineering department is much more limited than everyone thinks, which is perfectly fine were it not for the company's obsession with their twisted definition of 'customer service' claiming the poor sap in the engineering department owns the project/work order from start to finish. This is both a detriment to dealing with internal parties as well as the outside clients in which the work originally stems from. - Continuing from the last point, the bold claim that engineering 'OWNS' the work order/project from the company's favorite quote 'cradle to grave'. Not the best idea, having one person both directly interfacing with the outside clients 24/7 AND doing the actual behind the scenes work to get the project going on the utility side. Between lack of actual control over the scheduling/construction, funky software, babysitting the needy/greedy clients and more, you'll be amazed you can get any actual work done. You either can POSSIBLY catch up on emails and missed calls for the day, or get actual work done and scheduled (scheduled by someone else, do not forget). Never both, but don't tell management that cause they won't be able to hear you tucked away behind closed doors in their private offices. Engineering; even with all of the quirky software they have to use, would operate much more smoothly if they stuck to being fully behind the scenes instead of being one step up from call center representatives. Those sad, sad people. - Changing gears for a bit, the lack of a centralized employee handbook. Never given one at the beginning of the job, because I'm pretty sure one centralized document does not exist. Ever want to know the vacation policy? Better go give it a search on the company portal page, pray that you find it and hope that whatever document comes up is not out of date. Curious about maternity leave policy or any other common policy that's usually contained in one large handbook for all employees upon starting the job? Give it a go on the company's portal page and hope you can find something. Can't find it there? Ask one of the older coworkers, who may or may not know and if they do know... they don't remember where from. A lot of knowledge about anything and everything related to the job comes from word of mouth, which is terribly inconvenient because a lot of policies and standards change quite a bit through the years. Good luck knowing that though, from the slew of spam emails sent directly by the company to your inbox. No, I don't want to listen to a 'fireside chat' by the rich out-of-touch CEO, I want to know if the permanent above-ground pedestals we used are still within standards or if the amount of conductors in those pedestals has changed because I heard that through word of mouth from 3 different people. -Implementation of policies and processes with no input from the people in the field. By the time you learn what to do to get the job done right for once, the process and standards have already changed. This is by far one of the lesser gripes because thankfully everyone feels the pain, and it becomes comedic when it's a policy/process change related to anything the client has to deal with or provide. A change like finally having one dedicated email address for clients to send subdivision/apartment infrastructure paperwork to or requiring more responsibility on the client side related to temporary services always means the clients throw a fit, and then engineering gets the backlash for it despite engineering not having anything to do with the change. Excuse me, I mean the part of engineering that does the actual projects/work orders. The Standards group and management/HR jockeys that implement these changes don't have to endure the pain of dealing with the general public, so they are consequence free to do whatever they wish. -Implementation of a work management system that solely benefits accounting and is a complete obstacle to engineering and construction/maintenance. Ever wonder why all those old rotten poles are sitting out there that Duke more than likely knows about? 'The Budget'. Why are whole stretches of power lines not properly maintained or replaced? 'The Budget'. Line upgrade projects needed due to projected future load on standby? Oh, we can't get to it until at least next year because of 'The Budget'. The mythical Budget that nobody in the office fully understands or knows numbers of, The Budget that management claims to base their decisions off of, this is the Budget everyone speaks of yet knows nothing of. It sure affects everything though. With how much year after year management tells you the 'Budget' governs which projects go forward and which ones don't, it is mildly interesting to see how little they actually care about preserving 'The Budget' if there's even a 1% chance a meter is going to be set somewhere. Duke seems to rarely have 'The Budget' to replace leaning and rotten poles in neighborhoods that are obvious safety hazards, yet will be glad to install 100s of thousands dollars worth of infrastructure in a 'possible' future subdivision in which no guarantee any homes will be built. It isn't a shock to go to anywhere within the Duke territory and see entire plots of land with their infrastructure on it, but doesn't actually feed anything. You'd think such a budget-conscious company would do their due diligence to make sure the time and money spent on installing this equipment would bear fruit, but you'd be wrong. I am highly inclined to believe the secret top reason stuff gets put in whether it gets used or not is to shut the clients up and reduce the chance that they'll figure out a manager's number to call them up. - Extreme focus on 'CUSTOMER SERVICE', which is cute coming from a company that is a near monopoly and has little need to put such emphasis on it. Also doesn't help that the company is generally disliked by the general public, and you start seeing a recipe for success here. You know what actually pleases people? Projects that are complete and infrastructure that is put in doing what it needs to do, not babysitting the clients who call in all the time and never give you the information you need to get the work done that benefits THEM. Like I was hinting at before, having engineering do the actual work AND bending over pleasing these people is not a good combination. Duke tries to set up their system as if they are the friendly neighborhood utility that will cater to your every need, but with how their processes are set up and (mostly) monopolized they are the 'customer focus' portion is just delegated to the poor untrained and underpaid saps in the call center and the sad individuals stuck in engineering who have to deal with these people. You can also include the linemen who are unfortunately stuck with dealing with these individuals come construction time, and corporate trucking who half the time is forced to deliver to a site that is probably still unpaved and where the site people always expect them to be there yesterday. Management will always tout 'customer service' to everyone under their umbrella, only because they don't have to directly deal with the external parties themselves. That is, until the external clients come crying in because the company isn't bending over for them as much as they did 20 years ago like the clients claim and get phone numbers in management. That's when management starts breathing down YOUR neck, so make sure you have yourself covered which leads to the next point... - No matter how well you do with your work or how timely everything is scheduled, always save your emails with external clients (I suppose everyone internal too) because it will never be enough and throughout your tenure external clients will always try to somehow screw you over and complain to management. Cover yourself first, because management always takes the client's side until you can prove yourself correct in a Guilty unless proven Innocent mentality. Even if you have all your t's crossed and i's dotted, they'll always find some way to lecture you on how 'you could've done better' and gone unnecessarily above and beyond for these clients who will never for a minute provide you with everything you need to get your job done. Which I'll remind you, is to help ensure infrastructure gets installed due to the load they are adding. You give them an inch, they want a mile, and it never ends. Always cover yourself, because external clients never seemingly get enough and management always takes the 'customer is always right' approach. Better to get the job done and out of the way, because ultimately the meter being set is the only thing anyone is really after. That gives me a thought, on another con... - Due to the extreme and often unnecessary demand of the external clients (perpetually acting like you are ruining their lives if you don't get meters set and infrastructure installed yesterday that takes weeks) loads of work gets rushed on the Duke side and what actually gets installed for a project is quite possibly never the best solution. This reason is a good chance why some infrastructure that is installed out there looks pretty funky and is seemingly unreliable come storm time, especially the older infrastructure. It is likely 'rushed' and designed/installed the quickest and bare minimum meets standards as possible so ultimately the engineering department can lessen their over-the-top workload and get these clients off their backs. Because like mentioned before, Duke expects the poor engineering person assigned to the project to own it 'cradle to grave' and provides little to no support for them unless the clients call in to raise a fuss (usually for little to no reason) in which case management steps in to shut them up and facilitate the project to be rushed. Not many systems or processes in place to be proactive in mitigating these problems, only being reactive to the problems happening. Hence, why a lot of work gets rushed and people scramble to get things done. Speaking of storms from before... - Never be under the illusion that you will catch up on your work, because 1.grossly understaffed 2.clients that will forever make your job miserable and actively fight against you to provide information you need, which again the reminder is that this is info you need to get the projects done that THEY initiate 3.clients will never get the site ready for utility construction, even if you beat the requirements into their heads multiple times. Doesn't matter that they've done these same projects over the course of decades with Duke, they apparently have memory loss at the end of every project and forget what you need to get things done 4. STORMS. Get ready for the other part of the job, which is completely different from your regular job duties. Let's save that for a different point below because it is it's own can of worms. - Storms. Be prepared to drop everything you are doing to perform damage assessment if so much as a gust of wind rolls through town and downs a service line to a house at the edge of the territory. With hurricane season regularly coming and going, be prepared to go scouting for damage from dawn to dusk (sometimes after dark, because looking for downed power lines that blend in with the dark is smart!) because the company is 'committed' to 'customer service' and safety. The longer the lines remain de-energized, the more money they lose and the more riled up the general public becomes. Be prepared to deal with the general public running in front of your vehicle, trying to flag you down from the side of the road, personal vehicles blocking your exits, etc. because people want to know when the lights are coming back on and the call center number they called provides no info OR JUST AS LIKELY provides false info as to when the lines will be fixed. Alludes to something said previously, engineering does not ever know when any of these is ever happening. They're just sent out to assess damage, and record the details so the linemen can eventually get out there to fix what needs to be fixed. Nothing more, nothing less. All of this means your regular work gets put on hold, and guess what? General public/external clients doesn't care about that, Tropical Storm Duke just rolled through their neighborhood and you'll get calls as if no storm is going on and why the infrastructure they called for hasn't been installed yet even if their entire site is a giant wet puddle. Only benefit here is you get to use this time as an excuse to set your voicemails/automatic email replies saying 'storm rolled through, restoring those lines are priority not your apartment complex that isn't getting built for two years'. Certainly doesn't stop your regular work from coming in though, and it is mentally draining performing this damage assessment. Not even going to go into the strange pay structure Duke has set up for this part of the job which leads to contention between engineering and the linemen. You may get a free dinner out of it though, but I feel by that time of the day I just want to be home and away from everyone else who is just as disgruntled. - Strange software. Definitely one of the smallest gripes with the job; at first, it seems like one of the bigger problems but once you firmly grasp the above cons you realize it's extremely minor. Constant crashes, freezes, strange processes from start to finish, performing certain actions with designing or progressing the work order/project that may seem illogical, 'clicking too fast', and more certainly becomes a minor inconvenience. You better believe it contributes to a slower lifecycle of a project on the Duke side though. You learn to laugh at how hilariously inefficient the software is, especially when life around you is seemingly in flames and you're constantly backed into a corner. Funny enough, the software dedicated to storm outage restoration is robust and mostly reliable; likely due to how barebones and minimal it is. I believe that is best and is probably one of the few pros of the job. - Another glassdoor user noted lack of experienced peers due to them seeking jobs outside of engineering because of constant addition of responsibility to the job with a lack of benefit to go with it... I agree and disagree with this. Everyone that is intelligent makes sure to leave as quickly as they can for greener pastures, or gets lucky and figures out how to transfer to a much better job in a much better department. Everyone that wishes to become the ideal company drone finds out who to suck up to, and goes that route. For everyone else that is certainly smart and capable but has lots of outside family/life obligations or is unlucky, they are unfortunately stuck where they're at. So I disagree with that there is a lack of experienced peers. There are plenty of the old-timers to go around with their collective wisdom and experience... along with their common health issues, and general sense of depression in the workplace. You will never find a group more ready for retirement or a severance package than people in Distribution. - Good luck working in a smaller office that isn't Charlotte or Raleigh and transferring to a different role/department without suffering for 5+ years in your current role, because it likely won't happen. Unless you are an expert at kissing up to the right people, you're essentially pigeon-holed in your current job and stuck there. It's difficult to even transfer to THE SAME ROLE you are already performing but at a different location, and good luck finding out the real reason as to why your interview was unsuccessful. Claiming 'the other candidate had more experience' only works for so long especially if you're applying to the same role you currently hold but at a different location. That tells me that others in the same job are suffering as well, and trying in vain to go to other locations for even a .5% chance at landing a different role later down the line. Would rather not waste years of my life down the drain to constantly be beaten down and demoralized week after week. It seems to be the type of workplace where you can only get a better role by knowing the right person, being in a city location like Charlotte and being nurtured along a career path through there, or come in from an outside organization to get paid more for less work. Speaking of... - Don't think career development is really a thing here, especially if you are working outside of Charlotte or Raleigh. Pigeon-hole is the best way I can put whatever role you're in if you're at a smaller office. At least, nothing formal seems to be set up. If it's out there, it's somewhere to be searched in vain on the company portal along with the single collective employee handbook that probably doesn't exist and Sasquatch lurking somewhere on the 3rd search page. - HR? HR who? Pretty sure they were outsourced, and never think for a moment they are there to help you. No, they're to protect the company from the employees and be as vague as possible. That is, if you even know who HR is. There is a lot more, but enough has been said here. To sum it up; stay away from engineering on the distribution side, you will regret it immensely. Save your sanity and walk away. You can get better pay elsewhere, you can get better life fulfillment elsewhere. You will forever be plagued by bad memories and experiences after you see any power lines afterwards.

    Continue reading
    1 person found this review helpful
  4. 4.0
    Current Employee

    Financial sound and stable company

    May 2, 2022 - Gas Turbine Engineer 
    Recommend