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EY Reviews

Updated February 23, 2017
439 reviews

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  1. "Toxic office in Seattle"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Manager in Seattle, WA
    Current Employee - Manager in Seattle, WA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at EY full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Very flexible, work-life balance, opportunities if you work hard and make yourself visible.

    Cons

    Politics, politics, politics. Two-faced people, no mentorship from partners, over staffed at the manager level, no work and when you don't have enough work it's YOUR fault even though it's a partner level issue. At some point, it was forgotten that rewardin people for their hard work is a means to fight against attrition.

    Advice to Management

    Value your employees that clients like and can actually sell work vs. people who won't sell anything and detest leaving the office or to be near people.


  2. "Sr Manager"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at EY full-time

    Pros

    Culture, Brand, Opportunity to work with great clients

    Cons

    Up or out limits great technical people

    Advice to Management

    Keep doing great work!


  3. Helpful (1)

    "Not worth it, look elsewhere."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Business Advisory in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Business Advisory in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at EY (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Decent Salary

    Stable employment (It's pretty much impossible to get fired at this place. If you don't fit, they'll shift you onto a new project)

    Cons

    Work life balance is a joke here, you're beholden to every possible whim of the client. Weekends, late nights, holidays. Even when there isn't actual work to do, you'll have to stick around to just in case the client (or your manager) thinks there might be the possibility of work.

    High employee turnover, managers don't make much of an effort to build any kind of rapport w/ their employees as a result.

    Salaries don't reflect actual amount of work being done. (i.e. someone working 80 hour weeks on a deal based project will make the same as someone working on 9-5 AML project)

    Advice to Management

    Actually care about who your employees are, maybe you wouldn't be shedding 1-2 people off a team every single month.


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  5. Helpful (3)

    "IT Advisory"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - IT Advisory Staff in Cleveland, OH
    Former Employee - IT Advisory Staff in Cleveland, OH
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at EY full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    -Good place to gain experience and learn how to deal with stressful situations for fresh graduates.

    -Salary might be a bit higher than other companies (IT position) for entry level.

    Cons

    -No worklife balance
    -No year end bonus, no pay for overtime, very low winrate if consider total working hours. It's more of a rule that personal time should be used to satisfy delivery deadline, which is 80% time unrealistic due to poor management decision (over commitment), overturn, and poor budgeting
    -Poor project budgeting(they budget lower than actual, you will only get 20 hr billable time for a 50 hour workload, which basically make you a 'low performance' employee while you're spending nights and weekends to deliver by deadline.)
    -Repeated work, you're out of market (as a IT professional) if you work for them more than 1 year.
    -They always try to rush things out of door and never bother to put high quality in the product which totally against my personal value and standard as a IT professional.
    -The group leader don't know and don't trust his fellows staffs, team get yelled at and received stressful emails from him eventhough everyone is working their fingers off. I feel no respect from my group for my value, dedication, and hard working.
    -Very high turnover. Worst thing is, it never get leadership attention and get them change anything. It's more of intentionally ignored because by hourly rate we are cheap labor.
    -I'm a good employee with high rating, but I'm very disappointed and start losing hope for this company after 1st year.

    Advice to Management

    -Pay overtime.
    -Provide bonus to the people traveling all the time and having no chance to stay with their family.
    -Pay attention to the causes for the high turnover.


  6. Helpful (2)

    "Staff"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Advisory Staff in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Advisory Staff in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at EY full-time

    Pros

    Good travelling benefits if you can get on a travelling project. Typical perks that come with big company.

    Cons

    1) No Career Growth/ Learning
    Learned next to nothing in my years here except ppt and Excel, most of which I already knew before coming in. Training is a farce. They don't teach you how to think as other mgmt consulting firms do because you actually have no need in day to day work. No mentorship either. Thank goodness I know how to code, otherwise don't know how my skills will be transferable to anything else.

    2) Lots of Politics
    Lots and lots of politics. A - - kissing is a must. People don't care about you or your career growth just about covering their own behinds and how to make themselves look good.

    3) Rewards Mediocrity and Shuns Excellence
    As you go along you will see many smart people in the junior positions that filter out when you get to higher mgmt levels (manager, SM etc). This is not a coincidence. It's because of the aforementioned politics and general culture that rewards mediocrity and shuns excellence. Smart people tend to ask questions and voice their opinions when they think there is a better solution but you will find here that that is discouraged. It's expected that you just 'do your job' and 'don't ask questions' even when what your mgr is doing is clearly wrong and a day later you have to undo what you did and go in a different direction.

    4) Body Shop Projects
    A lot of projects, esp in FS advisory is centered around big banks and AML. These are the most boring projects ever and you will find yourself repeatedly doing things even a monkey can do. The only reason they ask EY to do it is because EY has the brand name and since its primarily an audit firm it is 'trustworthy'. The reason why EY staffs so many of these projects instead of automating is because they can earn more $$ on each resource

    Advice to Management

    Lots of smart people are filtering out at the junior level. Instead of fixating on how to increase your bottom line put more emphasis on retaining good talent. It will help more in the long run.


  7. Helpful (2)

    "Managed Document Review"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Contractor - Japanese Document Reviewer in Secaucus, NJ
    Former Contractor - Japanese Document Reviewer in Secaucus, NJ
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at EY as a contractor (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Good initial pay, pays weekly. Office building and cafeteria are nice. Not much after that.

    Cons

    One thing was very clear after a week or so on the job:

    Management clearly has very little experience with this sort of project, and it is very poorly run. Practically no training is offered, although recruiting ads clearly state that they will train and no experience is necessary. Management makes conflicting statements and does not produce comprehensive lists of search terms and counsel members. The search term highlighter is frequently down, and there are batches of documents that contain no highlighting whatsoever. Rather than try to educate and offer valid and usable feedback, management has taken a strategy to simply fire some 25-33% of the reviewers and bring on new ones weekly to replace them. These new reviewers may be no better (and in most cases have less experience than those being fired), but management keeps reaching further and further across the country (and world in some cases) to find new blood.

    They supposedly want to capture a percentage of this market (document review) going forward, but they've pretty much taken everyone available that's of any quality on the east coast, and now have to reach further to find new people. Some coming from as far away as Japan. They don't seem to care that they have brought people out from far away places, asked them to get to Secaucus, NJ at their own expense, and then let them go after a very short time. A new person joining really needs to weigh their options and see if getting paid for only two weeks on the job is worth the expense of a flight and hotel before deciding to join.

    Because of the firings, the office environment is now extremely tense and morale is very low. Reviewers don't know if they themselves will be let go that week. People are starting to look at other options and are not going to stay in that kind of environment unless they don't have a choice. I've been looking for other position for a few weeks now as I don't want to stay in this depressing environment any longer.

    Working on this project is like playing Russian Roulette.

    Advice to Management

    Rather than fire people (10 or more firings per week seems pretty standard now) and then bring on new ones to replace them, perhaps you may want to offer some substantial training and useful documentation. Current training leaves a lot to be desired, and answers that managers and QC people give (when you can get answers from them) is almost always contradictory. Churning through people can't be a very good business strategy, as you are dealing with a very small community of reviewers here and word travels fast that your way of doing things is to hire and then cut a new number of people, even some that have only on the job for two weeks. Thursday nights are dreaded because that's when reviewers get the "evening call" telling them they've been let go.

    Most of the people that you are hiring are intelligent and hard-working. They are more than capable of performing the job if you would only be clear in your expectations, offer training that actually meant something (with actual examples, and showing the document review software screen) that was clearly thought out and not just hastily thrown together and seen as a nuisance and chore by those running it.

    The people that you have doing QC need to be QC'd themselves. They sometimes send documents back that were coded correctly by the initial reviewer, with QC having missed a valid hit themselves. Most people are scared to challenge QC even when warranted, thinking that it might cause them to be fired.

    If you advertise for a 6-9 month contract, then you should honor that. People fly across the country, and leave other jobs to come and work on your project, basing their decision to join you on how you are representing the contract. It's very deceptive to say the least. People resign from other jobs to join this project, and you seem not to care in the least the precarious situation your summary terminations leave them in.

    The way you are running this project shows that you view people as a commodity and think that churning through a substantial number of people will get you what you want. It's a very small community of reviewers and word spreads quickly. It's noticeable that the new reviewers you are bringing on are getting younger and younger and less experienced, and coming from further away. If you are serious about continuing on in the document review business, you are really burning bridges and ruining your name. You are probably going to have serious problems finding acceptable reviewers to work for you in the future.

    If you would just take the people you plan to fire aside, make clear explanations and set clear expectations, then there is really no reason for the firings. There are people that are meeting the quotas you've set with a high degree of accuracy (and minimal feedback) are still getting fired, and there seems to be no rhyme nor reason to your decision to fire. Perhaps you might actually get what you want if you were clear about what you want, but the consensus among reviewers is that you're really not sure what it is you want yourselves. Very doubtful that the client would be pleased at the confused environment in which you are very poorly running the project they entrusted you with. If you're not getting what you want, you have no one to blame but yourselves.


  8. Helpful (1)

    "Not Great Place to Start"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Advisory Staff in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Advisory Staff in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Brand name, lots of deal flow

    Cons

    Poor comp, sweatshop mentality, ugly office environment

    Advice to Management

    Invest in your people and their happiness


  9. "Audit.."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Audit Staff in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Audit Staff in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at EY (More than a year)

    Pros

    People, engagement teaming, and crickets

    Cons

    Work/life balance, challenging work, politics, lack of meritocracy, the pay is god awful compared to industry standard

    Advice to Management

    Treat your high performers better, they are who keep the business alive


  10. Helpful (2)

    "Leadership Dysfunctional Not Transparent To Overall EY Leadership"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Advisory Manager in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Advisory Manager in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at EY (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Salary Above market Value
    Culturally good environment

    Cons

    IBM PWC and Accenture Guys come into EY and behave like IBM, PWC and Accenture and corrupt EY culture.

    Chicago mobster kind of environment at times intimidating women and junior consultants.

    As a guy, I have trouble as well. Reverse Racism is picking up faster

    Advice to Management

    How do you know Practice Leaders are giving you the correct picture?

    Partners not pulling their weight and still get paid hefty bonus

    Chicago based practice has the worst attitude and they get away with all unethical practices

    Background checks missing while hiring.

    Junior Managers and Seniors work hard. All credit, bonus and base pay increase goes to Sr. Managers and Partners.


  11. Helpful (1)

    "Surviving is the name of the game"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Core Business Services Staff in Atlanta, GA
    Former Employee - Core Business Services Staff in Atlanta, GA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at EY full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Nice benefits package overall on paper, but unfortunately they do not extend uniformly across all divisions of the organization. If you are in the good graces of leadership you can definitely make optimum use of the better "perks" available on the books, but if not, you will find a bevy of roadblocks that will block your access. Pay scale is far undervalued for certain divisions of the organization (i.e. Core Business Services). The best benefit to you after leaving will be the cache that the Big-4 name brings with it.

    Cons

    As can be expected in any of the Big-4 firms, this is a very high-stress corporate environment with long workdays being the norm rather than the exception. The Partner-focused carrot-and-stick achievement model is the built-in Achilles heal unfortunately, which results in a very old school bullying environment...fear of a bad review from Upper management is rampant here, so expect little-to-no support --this is the epitome of "throw you under the bus" corporate culture. There are 3 distinctive classes of employees here...the elite Partner/Upper Level Management class, the Wide-Eyed Fearful Class (mostly compromised of recent college graduates who are new to the corporate game and/or mid-level management who will do anything to reach the next level up on the corporate ladder), and lastly the unfortunate 3rd Class "Core Business Services" who get the stale crumbs left behind on the table and for whom advancement opportunities are virtually non-existent--these poor people give their life-blood to the support of the organization with very little recognition or gratitude to their very considerable efforts.

    If you can survive the high stress, rude and unprofessional conduct of the wanna-be underlings (not to mention the many years of burnout level drudgery) you just might find your pot of gold at the end of the rainbow (assuming your position doesn't get outsourced first to another country).

    Advice to Management

    There is absolutely no advice available that would not fall on deaf ears here...the baked-in old school corporate mentality model here will never change. Anyone who walks thru it's doors quickly realizes what they have signed up for--it's up to you to decide if the ultimate cost (to not only your health but your personal integrity) is worth the "payoff".



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