Education Advisory Board Reviews | Glassdoor

Education Advisory Board Reviews

Updated September 1, 2017
20 reviews

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3.5
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Robert W. Musslewhite
9 Ratings

20 Employee Reviews

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  1. "Happy here overall"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Consultant in Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Consultant in Washington, DC
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Education Advisory Board full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    If you're under 35, this is a great place to start. Company culture is fun and lots of intelligent people work here. I travel consistently for work and company takes good care of employees on the road.

    Cons

    In service delivery, work/life balance is not great. A lot of housekeeping tasks arise that add busy work to your plate. Pay is below market rate. You're incentivized on health of member relationship but sometimes that score is hurt by factors outside of your control.

    Advice to Management

    Better manage employee workload.


  2. "EAB sales and marketing associate"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Education Advisory Board full-time

    Pros

    There is free coffee and food.

    Cons

    Terrible management who could care less as long as they get their bonuses. People lie and step on each other to get their own promotion. Do NOT take this job. Terrible attitude from management and terrible environment.

    Advice to Management

    Don't lie to new hires.

  3. "Great place!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Education Advisory Board full-time

    Pros

    Employees are all smart and motivated

    Cons

    Compensation is low compared to similar companies


  4. Helpful (2)

    "Inconsistent leadership and accountability leads to wasted potential and lost opportunities for success"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Management in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Management in Washington, DC
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Education Advisory Board full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    - Entry-level staff given exposure to member-facing roles and can directly serve members at the CXO level

    - Lots of young, driven talent that's eager to please members and management alike

    Cons

    - Leadership endorses a toxic culture of harassment, sexual and otherwise. Leaders often
     can't control their behavior around staff and members alike, especially when alcohol is involved. HR will respond based on your place in the org chart.

    - Management selectively performs their assigned duties with no accountability when members/staff fall through the cracks. Unless you're hindering your boss' ability to climb the ladder, you can do whatever you please. An outside consulting company came in to diagnose management woes and politely informed leadership that management roles are poorly defined and not consistently enforced. The response was to hard-code "flexible" role definitions for staff (at individual manager discretion) and made the problem worse rather than encouraging accountability.

    - If you're male, be ready to adapt to the bro culture that's heavy on boozing and harassment. Participate or look the other way.

    - If you're a woman, you'll face harassment from peers and managers alike, with HR turning a blind eye. Loyalty is rewarded above performance.

    -Staff are actively encouraged NOT to write self-reviews during evaluation periods because management wants to avoid awkward conversations when expectations and reality collide.

    - HR will never, ever follow up without constant pushing, no matter how innocuous the request. They're primarily interested in doing favors for leadership-level staff, with expectations of a reward later. Established procedures are often ignored, and don't expect any action to be taken without a court order.

    - EAB's parent company's stock dropped 50% in two years, and it recently went through rounds of layoffs and office closures before selling a significant stake to a company that invests in failing or bankrupt companies. EAB is about a year or two behind the parent company with regard to EVERYTHING, so expect your job to be temporary.

    - You will be actively misled regarding your development and promotion opportunities, unless you've been unofficially "fast-tracked." Half of the jobs on the internal job board don't actually exist, and most of the remaining ones were promised to staff months earlier.

    - If you ever need to use federally-mandated medical leave to care for family, resign or lawyer up. The retaliation you'll endure isn't worth it, though.

    - Average staff tenure for the entire company is ONE YEAR. Speaks volumes on its own.

    Advice to Management

    - Managers are expected to deliberately misrepresent staff performance, either inflating performance ratings to make key players appear more impressive or important than reality, or slashing performance ratings to save money on bonuses and raises. If you need to be told not to do this, then you have management problems.

    - Stop rewarding managers for falsifying performance metrics for their departments. It feeds into a destructive cycle where staff are indirectly encouraged to lie to their bosses, and the bosses don't want to admit they were fooled.

    - Stop punishing high-performing staff. If "too many" staff in a department perform above and beyond expectations for their role, the department manager gets chewed out because the company has to pay out promised incentive bonuses. Performance is graded on a curve, regardless of what's outlined in evaluation matrices.

    - Stop lying to low-level staff about how their compensation compares to similar roles at other companies. HR compiled a "report" with zero data and declared the "rumors" about inadequate compensation to be false. For a company that runs on data and research, the effort was insulting and based on falsehoods.

    - Get your yearly budget done on time. Massive staff disruptions have occurred as a result of leadership either failing to submit a budget on time or deliberately misleading other managers about available resources.


  5. Helpful (3)

    "Not worth more than a year of your career life"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Business Analyst in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Senior Business Analyst in Washington, DC
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Education Advisory Board full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Decent work life balance, good focus on health & wellness

    Cons

    I can’t say enough bad things about this organization. It is truly one of the worst places I have worked. They brag about being more selective and having a higher rejection rate than Ivy League schools – that stat, if true, is probably because they have a huge pool of applicants and hires fresh out of college being brought in to do the grunt work of cold calling. The company seems to be leveraging the good reputation of years past. The culture skews young, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing, except that it attracts and retains the worst aspect of type A personalities – those who are in it for their own promotion and advancement, who won’t hesitate to throw teammates under the bus. Management is blind to this, if not actively encouraging it. Management further acknowledges that they pay less than industry standards to their comparables (although, what they consider their competitors is inaccurate – they are more of a consulting light, and people are rewarded for their ability to talk a good game rather than actually do good work) but tries to make up for it through a better work-life balance and “perks” like monthly company sponsored happy hours. This is a great perk if you are fresh out of school and want to continue your frat party days. They clearly are not paying enough given the incidence of theft of lunches from the community fridge.
         The work culture is cultish at best – they have an impressive media team that makes slick videos about all the company is doing, but if you look past the razzle dazzle, you can see everyone is drinking the koolaid. Management doesn’t invest in individuals’ career growth – the company doesn’t even have a true HR function (or if they do, it is unclear who to talk to about a non-career advancement issue – even someone on the HR team acknowledged it is unclear). Instead, they have folks dedicated to recruiting, hiring, and annual reviews, called Career Services. But this team is not invested in fairness or career growth for employees – in any dispute they side with the manager and don’t really bother hearing all sides of an issue. People are promoted without being taught how to be good/effective managers. Unhappy employees everywhere, mostly putting in their time to get the company name on the resume and one of the arbitrary title promotions.


  6. Helpful (1)

    "Coordinator"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Coordinator in Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Coordinator in Washington, DC
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Slightly more fun than your average cube-farm, this company is a great way for recent graduates to gain experience in a basic office environment or in sales/marketing. Getting promoted is a real possibility although it's not as easy or as quick as applicants were told (expectation used to be promotion after one year for above average performers, now it's 18-24 months).

    Cons

    Entry level positions are pretty thankless (not uncommon in the corporate world) but I feel they exaggerate the benefits and use them as an excuse to pay below market level (considering the cost of living in DC). This often leads to a higher than average level of discontent among entry-level associates and a higher turnover. I would only recommend entry-level marketing positions to those interested in sales. For those interested in working in higher ed or healthcare specifically, avoid marketing and try for the research or consulting departments. Also, full disclosure, there's some "evaluating" being done now and it's been hinted that things could change drastically in the next few months- it could even lead to pieces of the company being sold.

    Advice to Management

    Give applicants more realistic expectations of what the job is like, if they go into their position with open eyes they won't feel deceived.


  7. "Great experience, terrible pay"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Education Advisory Board full-time

    Pros

    Great work experience, good culture, generous time off

    Cons

    Terrible pay. Company pays 10-20% below market

    Advice to Management

    Pay your employees for their hard work.

  8. "Client Success Manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    Pros

    Fantastic work environment-- great team, clear paths for promotion.

    Cons

    Knowledge base lends itself to working on a wide range of projects that can be overwhelming at times.


  9. "Review Title"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    Path to promotion is clear. You get what you earn and what you work for.

    Cons

    Internal communication is difficult between departments.


  10. "Awesome Software Company"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Software Engineer in Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Senior Software Engineer in Washington, DC
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    Interesting work, modern platforms/programming languages, incredibly knowledgeable mentors, great pay/vacation/bonuses/benefits

    Cons

    Honestly, there are no real cons


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