22nd Century Media - Good product, Bad leadership | Glassdoor
There are newer employer reviews for 22nd Century Media
There are newer employer reviews for 22nd Century Media

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Helpful (6)

"Good product, Bad leadership"

Star Star Star Star Star
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Orland Park, IL
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Orland Park, IL
Doesn't Recommend
Neutral Outlook

I have been working at 22nd Century Media full-time (More than a year)

Pros

The little hyper-local newspapers are a great source for local news. Over all it could be a good product and business model.

Cons

The turn over at the company is beyond crazy. The salaries are horrible unless you work in the Northbrook office. It s disorganized at best. The office is dirty and cluttered. The benefit package is bad and expensive. The management team is young and inexperienced. One manager is yelling and using foul language while the other is so disorganized that questions go unanswered. They do not take responsibility for their own mistakes, rather heep it on to those who do the grunt work.

Advice to Management

Get rid of the top management and bring qualified people in. Clean up the office as it is disgusting. Pay a decent salary and qualified people will be interested. Give respect to the work force and they will work hard.

Other Employee Reviews for 22nd Century Media

  1. Helpful (2)

    "Great place to flourish as an editor"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Editor
    Former Employee - Editor
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at 22nd Century Media (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    The experience you gain as an Editor with 22nd Century cannot be matched. While both Editors and Assistant Editors are expected to work hard, they are constantly challenged to discover, seek out, write and edit stories the community craves.

    While it's not always an easy gig, 22nd Century Media Editors are trained to deliver the complete package. From print and web stories to photography and social media, the company helps transform its employees into well-rounded individuals who can tell an accurate and interesting story in a variety of ways.

    If you're truley interested in being a journalist in the 21st century, 22CM will push and challenge you to thrive in ways you never would have expected. And if you put in the time and effort, you're often able to take on more responsibilty and move up in the company.

    Cons

    It's not easy. Anyone who knows journalism knows it's not a 9-5 business. You're expected to work hard, which sometimes includes nights and weekends, and you're probably not going to break the bank doing it. Don't go into journalism for the money.

    Advice to Management

    Put in the time and effort to help editors grow, and give them the tools they need to thrive.


  2. "Have more respect for yourself than to stay here long"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Editorial
    Former Employee - Editorial
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at 22nd Century Media full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    • Excellent entry-level work to start someone off in journalism, but staying here longer than 1.5 years is pushing it.

    • You do everything, but you're welcomed to focus on areas you're interested in or excel at (village, lifestyle, sports, etc.).

    • Pay is not totally paltry: It's good for those two years you before you move on, and better than a lot of other papers, but don't expect a raise or adjustment for inflation.

    • Even if you have a solid work ethic, it will grow with a company where there's always something to do and downtime doesn't really exist.

    Cons

    • Workload and work/life balance: You know that feeling after you lift weights at the gym and everything seems to feel lighter? After you leave this company, working elsewhere will feel like that. It'll feel weird to consistently have Friday nights and weekends off, as will having a social life. Because 40 pages of newspaper need to be filled with about as many news stories and features – and despite a small network of freelancers – it comes down to the editor and assistant editor (the latter of whom is working for two papers at a time) to make everything happen. That can amount to an obscene amount of work.

    • Low ceiling: You'll likely be hired on as an assistant editor, and the next step up is editor. That's about as far as you go, unless you decide to make this company your career. If that's the case, you might become a cluster manager if you haven't jumped off a bridge yet.

    • Inexperienced management: The highest tiers of management have been with the company near its inception and hardly anywhere else. That amounts to a lot of experience, but not much variety of experience. While they manage the company well enough to function, the rookie tendency to lead through fear rather than respect often becomes apparent.

    • Constructive critique not appreciated: If you have an idea about how something could be done differently or more efficiently, don't expect it to happen. You'll be humored, but little will happen. While there's some room for creativity with actual content, the company follows a format for all of its newspapers – down to its most basic operations. Not a bad thing in concept, but some gears really need grease.

    • CEO: Jack is pretty much hands-off and has especially been so since he turned the company over to its three leading employees, which is admirable, but when he gets a wild hair, his politics and borderline conspiracy theories might put you (as a journalist) on a wild goose chase into ethical gray zones.

    Advice to Management

    • Invest in a creating a true company culture: Your employees will be more loyal and respect you more for it.

    • Invest in professional development: No one's too good to learn how to improve or too old to learn a new trick. Shell out some cash to bring in speakers or send employees to conferences where you and they can learn new skills to bring back to the company.

    22nd Century Media Response

    Feb 7, 2017

    Thank you for the feedback; though, I believe some of your critiques are outdated. Initiatives — such as flexible hours and less weekend work — have been implemented in an effort to ease the burden ... More

There are newer employer reviews for 22nd Century Media
There are newer employer reviews for 22nd Century Media

See Most Recent

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