Accenture - Review of Accenture Consultant | Glassdoor
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"Review of Accenture Consultant"

StarStarStarStarStar
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Consultant in San Francisco, CA
Current Employee - Consultant in San Francisco, CA
Approves of CEO

Pros

Ability to change the type of work and industries you work in.

Cons

Long hours, needing to regain client trust - client after client, travel

Advice to Management

Don't sell fixed fee work.

Other Employee Reviews for Accenture

  1. Helpful (2)

    "Accenture Experience"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Project Manager in Atlanta, GA
    Former Employee - Project Manager in Atlanta, GA
    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Exposure to new/emerging methodologies, technology and ideas regularly
    Generally, great people in the trenches
    great branding and name recognition
    Any similar job will be a breeze after working for this company (Trial by fire?)

    Cons

    - No respect/career path for experienced hires, but your abilities will be used to the greatest extent with no recognition; Why the double standard? You don't survive for long if you are not good;
    - No reward system worth speaking of.
    - Negative feedback only. If you accomplish 99 of a hundred tasks (an oppressive number) as required, you will only get feedback on that one outstanding task unless you know the right people;
    - Extremely political, promotions based on who you know and a 'what have you done for me lately' mentality, which explains why more than a few of the managers are incompetent;
    - work.life balance is a core value on paper only;
    - laddering process used to determine salary increases and promotions work against the employee who changes career path since no matter how well you perform in your new role, the general consensus is that you can not be ranked higher than a barely functioning employee who has been in the role longer; Note that there is no transition period - you are just as likely to be given the same type opf assignment as that experienced employee with little support from mgt.
    - tendency to 'shoot self in the foot' by loading projects with new hires resulting in higher profit margin but struggling project, which in turn will (unfairly) affect the next performance evaluation of all involved.
    - Unable to determine role of HR. I think their job description requires that they back up the SMs and SEs so don't waste your time;
    - Burn-out pending

    Advice to Management

    - Determine if your current model is really working. How successful can you really be with the turnover/employee morale you have?
    - Take a hard look at the corporate culture. It is disheartening to say the least.
    - Rethink how you're handling your experienced hires. Who is really pulling these projects off (or not) in the end? Leverage their experience.
    - develop an objective performance model. Overall, modelling is one of the things the company does best.
    -Stop taking yourself so seriously!


  2. Helpful (6)

    "Really depends on the type of person."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Analyst to Consultant in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Analyst to Consultant in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    - You do end up getting really good experience.
    - The travel can be fun if you don't have any commitments (i.e. girlfriend/wife)
    - The pay *eventually* gets good, but be prepared to make little in the beginning. Once you make manager, you start getting pretty good pay.

    Cons

    - Management is pretty bad, horrible at providing feedback.
    - Partners and senior managers don't care about you. All they care about is selling. They will under-bid a project ridiculously, and over-promise. In these situations, the analysts and consultants get screwed. You may think this is the exception, but I was on six engagements over four years and each one was like this. Get used to having to deal with and clean up the messes of others. This includes working 100 hr weeks and weekends. In addition, since there is no budget, your manager won't let you charge overtime.
    - How you get rated is lame. It pretty boils down to kissing the right person's behind.
    - When employees are really bad, they don't fire them, they just promote them. I've seen it happen.
    - If you are a senior manager, and are the most evil person in the world, upper management will put up with you because you can sell and bring in dollars. I've worked with a senior manager like this that would thrash the people below him on a daily basis, killing morale.
    - The organizational structure is impossible to figure out.
    - Aside for mandatory analyst, consultant, manager, etc... training, other outside forms of training are rare since it comes from the project's budget.
    - You will work with a lot of arrogant people that don't know their stuff, but can talk a good game.
    - Get used to everybody covering their behind, no matter what.
    - People spoke about "good" projects, but after six engagements, I was never on one and never met anybody that was on a good one.
    - Be prepared to be considered an expert even if you have never done the type of work before in your life. If you don't know what Java is, don't be surprised to get staffed as a Java Jedi (and have to face clients.....)
    - I could go on and on, but if you haven't gotten the point yet, then maybe Accenture would be the perfect place for you!

    P.s. Don't believe the B.S. they say that after working at Accenture for a while, your next job will be a CIO position, or your salary will be twice as much. Every once in a while a partner becomes a CIO elsewhere, but most places won't pony up for consultants, in my experience.

    Advice to Management

    Quit under-bidding and over-promising on projects just to win work, and then screwing everybody that actually has to complete the project on time (Managers and below). This kills morale, creates burnout, and makes the firm lose a lot of good people.

There are newer employer reviews for Accenture
There are newer employer reviews for Accenture

See Most Recent

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