Boeing - Great place for an engineer. | Glassdoor
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There are newer employer reviews for Boeing

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"Great place for an engineer."

Star Star Star Star Star
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Manufacturing Engineer in Everett, WA
Current Employee - Manufacturing Engineer in Everett, WA
Recommends
Positive Outlook
Approves of CEO

I have been working at Boeing full-time (Less than a year)

Pros

Pay, benefits, and retirement matching.

Cons

Bureaucracy (it's a big company).

Other Employee Reviews for Boeing

  1. "Supply Chain Positions"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Material Management & Transportation in Seattle, WA
    Current Employee - Material Management & Transportation in Seattle, WA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Boeing full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Very big with opportunity to move around

    Cons

    Not a well integrated supply chain. Many competing goals and objectives

    Advice to Management

    Focus on the total supply chain cost as opposed to discrete functions within the supply chain


  2. Helpful (3)

    "Trying to improve, but still spinning their wheels"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Finance in Seattle, WA
    Former Employee - Finance in Seattle, WA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Boeing full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Boeing has official processes for EVERYTHING, so you will definitely gain a level of discipline by joining the company. They take ethics and diversity VERY seriously at lower levels (disregarded, famously, at higher levels), so you'll be on a level playing field with your peers.

    Cons

    You'll have a ridiculous amount of training to take - none of which will help to prepare you for skills needed in your role (annual training in laptop security, accepting bribes, etc - about 15-20 hours of online classes to take in these each year). Since Boeing uses primarily homegrown systems (when they do buy off-the-shelf, it gets customized to a level you wouldn't recognize), it can take a while to learn their systems. And, annoyingly, every division and department within those divisions use their own - so when you move to a new position, you're essentially starting from scratch again.

    Boeing is still very much a political, "yes-man" environment. While there are pockets where this is not the case - it's generally the norm throughout. As you have more exposure to higher levels, this becomes more evident. The company is not adapting to today's environment, and not embracing the skills brought in by today's younger employees. While most areas of the company are looking to change however they can, the higher levels in that organization are still be incented to keep things the way they are - as that's the environment they've excelled at and got them to their levels.

    Advice to Management

    Boeing is reaching the point that they're so old-fashioned that small changes won't make a difference. I joined a Finance team where I was the second on the team with a college degree. I left a company where only one person didn't have an MBA to join a team where 80% didn't even have undergrad degrees. I'm not a college elitist, but I can't imagine having Finance or Accounting teams without Finance and Accounting degreed employees.

    In the Seattle area, Boeing employees are considered 'unhirable' in the area by a number of recruiters (I have heard this first-hand by multiple recruiters from large local well-known companies) based on the over-dependency on processes. Many of my coworkers did not understand their positions well enough to explain them in layman's terms, but they knew the processes that were already laid out for them. If something new came up that didn't easily fit into the process, it took hours of meetings with 15-20 people to discuss how to handle. If you focused more on fully understanding your area/role/discipline, employees could adapt more quickly. Most employees who have been around for 20-30 years and excelled (or at least gotten by) in the current environment won't change. When the mass retirements happen over the next few years, bring in some people at higher levels (directors and higher) from the outside who can help make some big changes. If you continue only promoting based on ability to excel in today's environment, you're going to continue to have leaders at high levels who can't fathom the serious change that will be needed to survive. Luckily you only have one competitor. As soon as there's a second (once China can start producing commercial aircraft or if Embraer expands to larger planes), Boeing will quickly become the third player.

There are newer employer reviews for Boeing
There are newer employer reviews for Boeing

See Most Recent

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