Circles - Upper management disconnected form the needs of the front line staff. | Glassdoor
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There are newer employer reviews for Circles

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"Upper management disconnected form the needs of the front line staff."

Star Star Star Star Star
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
Disapproves of CEO

Pros

There is a good since of community with your fellow co-workers who are on your same level. Modern work environment.

Cons

The upper management disconnected form the needs of the front line staff becouse they do not know how the role has changed over the years.

Advice to Management

I think that side by side shadowing of phone reps would be helpful to individuals on all levels of management.

Other Employee Reviews for Circles

  1. "Lost their ideals somewhere along the way"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Service Professional in Boston, MA
    Current Employee - Service Professional in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    As a Service Professional, you become extremely resourceful really quickly. SPs learn how to handle picky and self-entitled callers as well as vendors around the world. You will take a lot of those skills with you to whatever job you find next. The location in South Boston was very easy to get to. If you were lucky enough to have a former SP as your immediate supervisor (Team Leader), you usually had someone on your side when upper management was aiming to knock you down individually. Circles also used to give out the most generous quarterly bonuses to everybody on the team that performed decently. That has since changed but it felt more like a reflection on the economy than anything.

    Cons

    The company suffered the typical middle management bloat as they grew from the small company that felt like family to the overglorified and corporate-owned call center they are today. Management grew more and more out of touch with the SPs working the front lines. Work quotas were unreasonable when balanced with quality assurance, and it was hard to get a break once QA was moved to a remote site. Your appraisals were emailed to you instead of being personally given and discussed by the QA specialist in a one-on-one. There were clear standards which weren't upheld uniformly. You may have worked hard on a time-critical request (caller is at the airport and needs help NOW) only to be graded down severely because you didn't "make a connection" with them -- that is, engaged in small talk while on the phone with them. Who wants to be bogged down with small talk when they need to be on the next flight out?

    Opportunities for advancement were vaunted left and right, but more often than not they'd hire from the outside rather than promote from within. As it was, the average age of the SPs was mid-20s, and almost nobody viewed the position as a stepping stone to something higher-up in the company. Those who excelled as SPs and showed a mind for continuing were typically promoted to some other management role where they had very little contact with their former coworkers. As such, almost everybody in my department considered the job just an interim job to pay the bills while they worked on something better. Everybody was in some form of continuing education, be it night classes or grad school. Attrition was high because you got out just as soon as you were ready.

    Every year the company would hold the nigh-obligatory Employee Satisfaction Survey, administered by web app. While they assured us left and right that the results would be completely confidential and totally anonymous, you still had to log in to the survey app with your company username and password. This pretty much sums up management's oblivious attitude and the facade they so desperately wanted to keep up in the face of employee dissatisfaction and skepticism.

    Advice to Management

    Don't just judge by the numbers. Don't tell the SPs "Not to worry, we are sure you can handle this quota increase!" when most didn't meet it the previous time you raised it. You say you are a company that listens, and promotes "honest and open communication" (it's even in the mission statement, for crying out loud.) So start upholding that. Get to know what the front-line SPs face and address those concerns first and foremost. The "SP Advisory Board" was nigh-useless and only resulted in SPs being taken off the floor for meetings when they were needed most on the phones. I know you can't go back to the small, friendly company you used to be, but that doesn't mean you have to be a completely cold, oblivious corporate subsidiary either. Walk that walk after talking the talk. Your mission statement should be the company philosophy and not just a nicely-worded blurb that looks good on the website.


  2. "Glorified call center"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Decent benefits...especially now that concierge services are available to employees (it only took 13 years). It's a young company, even if you don't include service professionals (which tend to be very young).

    Cons

    No honest management communication. No vision on where management is taking the company and they are generally happy to maintain the status quo, even though this is obviously not going to allow the company to grow.

    Advice to Management

    Figure out what you want Circles to be. Embrace technology and stop being a glorified call center. You have the technology and talent already in place, now do something about it.


There are newer employer reviews for Circles
There are newer employer reviews for Circles

See Most Recent

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