Cisco Systems - Not bad, if you are a good performer | Glassdoor
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There are newer employer reviews for Cisco Systems

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Helpful (3)

"Not bad, if you are a good performer"

StarStarStarStarStar
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Individual Contributor in San Jose, CA
Current Employee - Individual Contributor in San Jose, CA
Recommends
Approves of CEO

Pros

Merit-based pay increases (despite what other reviews say, this does happen very often)
Good overall compensation
Great health care benefits philosophy
Cutting-edge of the industry
Rewards for exceptional performance
Flexible work options

Cons

Not much opportunity for short or medium-term career growth
A lot of VIP executives (Vesting in Peace)
Too easy to hide and not do much work
Too many corporate "priorities"

Advice to Management

Provide career development opportunities for young and ambitious employees... otherwise they will go elsewhere. Hold groups and teams who do not add value accountable and be ready to make difficult decisions against managers and directors.

Other Employee Reviews for Cisco Systems

  1. Helpful (6)

    "Used to be a great place to work... now it feels like any other large organization"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Engineer in Raleigh, NC
    Current Employee - Engineer in Raleigh, NC
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Cisco is great for your resume and giving you good experience at how global organizations work. It gives you exposure to a broad customer base, and how each of those work as well. There is a lot to be learned that's both technical and experiential.

    The benefits are (were) great, but now they're dwindling with every cycle.

    There are still a few managers who DO care, but you may have to dig to find one during your career.

    Salary is (was) great, but buying power is dwindling with the lack of merit/COLA increases.

    If you're customer-facing there is still a good deal of job security. If you're in IT or development, not-so-much, offshoring is the name of the game.

    For a really big company, it really is one of the better one's out there.

    Some of the serious technology plays have a good chance at being highly successful and keeping Cisco on top of the industry pack.

    Cons

    Leadership team members have lost touch with reality, and are primarily drinking the Kool-Aid. They communicate the direction to Sr Management and line-management, and those managers are then forced to try and take an untenable vision/strategy and execute upon it. How well they can balance reality with fantasy determines how well you, as an individual contributor will do.

    In the ancient past, if you chose to bring up a serious weakness of a product/service you were considered to be contributing to the success of the team, now if you are outspoken you are not a team player. Empowerment is now non-exsistent. Mediocrity is becoming the norm, and those that want to excel are starting to look outside the doors of Cisco now that the Golden Handcuffs (stocks/bonus/benefits) are evaporating.

    The EPM (employee review) cycle is a joke and your reviews are strictly based on your manager and his/her ability to 'fight' for you at leadership ratings/ranking meetings.
    Have a passive manager who doesn't like a good fight or has someone else they're solely rooting for? You'll not get that strong E+ or X rating to get that promotion or salary increase. Period.
    If you have a passionate manager that cares for his/her people, then they can eventually "spread some love around" to you, but chances are it will take a few cycles.

    A note to prospective employees: Once your inside, if you plan on sticking around, shop for those managers... If you can find one that's good with people, technically sharp, and somewhat politically savvy at the same time you might be able to also get some promotions along the way as he/she rides the wave upward. You need to use your skills/merit to leverage yourself into an org that will allow you to play this game, then you can be promoted. This skill took me a long time to learn, but it's a good one to learn, since it doesn't just apply here as Cisco is just like any other big company now.

    And yes: negotiate a high starting salary - you may not see an increase for some time.

    Advice to Management

    Stop listening to the 'yes' men only, and start listening more closely to feedback from your customers as well as individual contributors and line-management.

    Stop treating us like children. Historically we would hear about 'bad news' in a direct, adult discussion. Now we get to listen to VoD's that tell us 'just a tease' then tells us how next month there will be another VoD that will tell us just a little bit more on how badly we're going to get screwed on whatever perk or benefit is being reduced or removed.


  2. "Comfortable but not exciting"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Director in San Jose, CA
    Current Employee - Director in San Jose, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Smart people, solid employment, good benifits

    Cons

    extremely top heavy, too many people fighting, lack of accountability of executives

    Advice to Management

    extremely top heavy, too many people fighting, lack of accountability of executives

There are newer employer reviews for Cisco Systems
There are newer employer reviews for Cisco Systems

See Most Recent

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