Clickability - Great potential, but imperfect execution and poor communications with employees | Glassdoor
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There are newer employer reviews for Clickability

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"Great potential, but imperfect execution and poor communications with employees"

Star Star Star Star Star
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in San Francisco, CA
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in San Francisco, CA
Doesn't Recommend
Disapproves of CEO

Pros

Great location
All in all, a good team of people
Senior management is very approachable and mostly very supportive
Competitive benefits

Cons

Inconsistent management at various levels in the company
Fairly young and inexperienced team
Overconvidence led them to overhire in 2008, forcing them to downsize significantly in 2009
Lack of structure and organization
Too many meetings
Lack communications from senior management about the state of the company - employees pushed to exhaustion to complete major projects on evenings and weekends then laid off without warning as soon as project was complete

Advice to Management

Focus on core product development and employee morale
Focus on smart growth
Provide clear and realistic targets for employees
Provide more hands on management and structure
Empower people to be sucessful, leverage their strengths and reward them for sucess
Don't keep your employees in the dark about critical issues affecting their professional and personals lives

Other Employee Reviews for Clickability

  1. "Great place to work!"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Clickability full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Office culture was pretty remarkable.

    Cons

    young leadership team but eager to excel


  2. "Was this company the inspiration for the Dilbert comic strip?"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Clickability full-time

    Pros

    Salary and ability to work remotely from home. These are literally the only pros that I experienced working here. Everything else was horrible.

    If you live in the Bay Area, there are literally thousands of better jobs available to you that will be much more satisfying. Take one of those. If you are working remotely, I know money is hard to find, but you will pay dearly for this one in existential angst.

    Cons

    This company is broken. If you are a thoughtful person, you will see all kinds of red flags beginning with how they conduct your interview process. This will provide you valuable insight into what it will be like to work here. Heed the warning signs; I wish that I had. Working here was a terrible experience. I wish that I could somehow be refunded this period of my life.

    I worked in a technical, client-facing role. Specifically, this is what made working here such a bad experience:

    - It is a terrible product. It was probably once cutting edge, but it is not overseen at any level by anyone with any real vision. I am not sure why any client knowingly would sign up to use this tool for any aspect of their web strategy. Clients are basically paying for overpriced custom web development (with severe limitations) masquerading as a platform.

    - There is no effective management or clear management structure. Management was almost non-existent, and when available was painfully unhelpful, disinterested, or, at worst, like throwing a hand-grenade into your project. Communication with them was a constant game of "Guess What's in My Head?!" with an often added fun twist of "Guess Whose Head?".

    - Almost non-existent internal communication. Communication is a challenge everywhere, but it is truly a unique brand of challenging here. There is absolutely no thought given to how to effectively communicate. I have never felt so frustrated in a team environment before. Improving communication here means upgrading to hipchat or slack, and nothing deeper ... like, maybe? ... making sure everyone is on the same page before beginning work, or providing context or background on a task before assigning it, or encouraging questions and taking the time to effectively answer them, or maybe a final analysis or sunset on a challenging project? I think castaway Tom Hanks had more meaningful communication with Wilson the Volleyball.

    - They have no clue how to bring new people onboard. Their process is one of apprenticeship where they believe that you will learn by osmosis. They have no real documentation of anything. There is no serious introduction to new hires or even to clients on the fundamentals of the platform. The result is that there are way too many folks in the company who know next to nothing about how the product works, and they lean on a few elders to do pretty much everything of substance. It is a sink or swim culture that prides itself on empty Type-A slogans like 'we like take-charge people' and 'folks who don't need direction'. I can understand how that might work as a philosophy for certain businessy parts of a company, but it does not work at all for EVERY part of your company.

    - They have no understanding of effective client relationships. On every project I was involved in here, I was briefed that there was a small client 'campfire' that needed to be put out. All of my questions about what the campfire were answered with 'you will get all the answers and supplies you need from the people on the ground', and then I was parachuted into it (i.e. met with a client), only to discover that: there are no people on the ground; this is a large, raging wildfire with multiple fronts; there are no supplies, no lines of communication, no terrain map, no actual fire-fighting equipment and just a few poorly written pamphlets written by an ESL student on how to construct primitive fire-fighting tools out of things you can find in the burning forest. Every single project was like this: unmitigated, post-apocalyptic chaos. Honestly, a few times information was only shared on a need to know basis and someone decided I just didn't need to know, but mostly it seemed that management and many of my co-workers were happily clueless about the reality of their client relationships, and were quite OK working in this sort of chaos on a daily basis.

    - There is no roadmap for where they want anything to go. No one seemed at all to be really focused on doing the real work of a business, even basic things like ... striving to build a product that is useful to your users and better in some way than your competitors, improving efficiency, and, shockingly, looking for ways to land new clients and projects. This company has been through a few acquisitions prior to my arrival (see reviews of Upland Software). Working here felt a lot like I had stumbled upon an extinct, perhaps once great ancient civilization that has been re-inhabited by a much, MUCH less advanced one.

    - They outsource and hire contractors for everything they possibly can. It was stunning what important parts of their business they are willing to farm out and then white label as their own - things that anyone with common sense would think are crucial to keep in-house, like management roles and maintenance of core parts of the product. This threw a huge monkey wrench into everything. It would not surprise me if they are considering how to outsource the process of outsourcing.

    - This was a soul-sucking place to work. It is the kind of place where everyone has their head down or works remotely, and no one says 'good night' at the end of the work day or 'have a nice weekend' at the end of the work week. There was no office culture, no concept of work/life balance, and tricksy 'benefits' like 'unlimited' vacation which is just a ruse to actually encourage you to take practically no vacation, i.e. no one is encouraging you to take any, none of your peers take any, and there are never any breaks in your work load where you could conceivably take one. At times, it felt like I had been cast as an extra in the sequel to 'Trading Places' except this time the Duke Brothers wagered over whether or not the operations of a company could be managed and implemented by a group of folks who all measure high on the autism scale. (Spoiler alert! It apparently can.) Seriously, it does seem to be a place that attracts a lot of folks who are severely lacking in social skills. Collectively they create a very hollow work environment.

    Advice to Management

    It it is not a place that does any analysis. Advice to management is pointless.

There are newer employer reviews for Clickability
There are newer employer reviews for Clickability

See Most Recent

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