Directions Research - Great "Family" Environment | Glassdoor
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There are newer employer reviews for Directions Research

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"Great "Family" Environment"

Star Star Star Star Star
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
Recommends

Pros

- Family atmosphere
- Flexible work schedule
- Strong compensation & Benefits packages
- Casual attire
- Nice office spaces

Cons

- Limited advancement opportunities
- No formal development/training programs

Advice to Management

Balance focus on sales results with personal development goals for employees

Other Employee Reviews for Directions Research

  1. "Inclusive bonus distribution"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Directions Research full-time

    Pros

    Opportunity to become partner in a laid back environment

    Cons

    Headquarters in Cincinnati, airport is not a hub


  2. Helpful (5)

    "Voter Suppression for Developers"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Developer in Cincinnati, OH
    Former Employee - Developer in Cincinnati, OH
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Directions Research full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    - Inclusive bonus structure
    - Higher pay than average
    - Everyone gets an office

    Cons

    - Painfully withholding with software & hardware
    - Unwilling to listen to new ideas on how to leverage technology
    - NO career path for developers
    - Cowardly Directors don't help
    - Annual speeches do a lot to suppress morale
    - Closed ownership system
    - Far behind on technology
    - Refusal to send tech staff to trainings/conferences
    - Nepotism galore

    Advice to Management

    Directions claims to exercise 4 tenets: Nurture, Equal, Willing, Supportive...aka NEWS

    NURTURE
    The company nurtures developers' ideas only after usurping them; they refuse to issue standard development equipment; they refuse to provide basic software.

    There was some to-do about a "Shark Tank" process, but even before presenting an idea, I was bombarded with some mumbo jumbo about "the company is risk adverse". This predisposition to saying "No"...is that supposed to be nurturing?

    Where's the training? I know everyone is at the top of their game, but technology doesn't stop. Requests for conferences pertinent to our work was denied, because, and I quote, "we typically don't send developers to those".

    EQUAL
    You work 60-80 hour weeks, your work/life balance is completely off. To top it off, every annual speech is an exercise in demotivation; "only those with X amount in sales can become an owner". Let's explore that further. Some of the largest shareholders PERFORM ZERO SALES. I never realized how lucrative being in HR can be; you'd think they were married to the big boss or something.

    Exceptions to the rule seem to exclusively benefit the senior Management Inner Circle. All other employees are LESS EQUAL. It's a plus that they pay above average industry salaries, but the trade-off is employees are less inclined to want to become an owner. Sorry, all those with a spare $20k and a belief in Directions; no stocks for you. Confer with HR to get their tips on having the most sales.

    With these types of exceptions, how is there room for Equality?

    WILLING
    I suggested incentivizing a find-a-bug program which rewards analysts for bugs they find in deliverables. Imagine the sense of belonging when you know you are directly contributing to a project's success. Imagine how debugged the company's output will be. I recommended this program so that developers can focus on developing, and let those who use their applications willingly take on debugging. If you want to find 100 bugs, ask for help; if you want to find 1,000 bugs, pay for help.

    When the founder of the company stands in front of the company and says "just ask for the tools you need", and you do just that, the last thing you'd expect is to be demonized for asking. Again, "we typically don't hand out laptops to developers" was the argument I faced.

    Then came the guilt-baiting: "this was approved at great cost" or "this request annoyed the powers-that-be" were the precursors to approval of a simple workstation. Finally, with laptop in sight, I was told the company wouldn't pay the $115/yr cost for an extra Office license. Is that Willing?

    Ask for an extra monitor and you have to listen to some speech about "precedence". "What if [name withheld] asked for equipment to work from the top of the Himalayas?" YES, THAT IS AN ACTUAL QUOTE!!!

    Innovations directors throw around phrases like "we've never done that before" to cop out of innovating. He also took a recommendation of using a Hackathon as a team building exercise and suggested we (developers) hijack it and use it as a project work session. Easily the most ignorant display of Development Non-Understanding I'd witnessed with no place in business development innovation.

    It's obvious those with power lack the wherewithal to work with developers and could use some training on managing them.

    SUPPORTIVE
    A new manager sent a "What Does Success Look Like for Our Team" email, complained that he only got a smattering of responses, then lets me go after I provided a detailed list of problems and suggestions on how to fix them, some of it included in this review. Of course, he cited some trumped-up excuse to let me go instead of being truthful.

    Lesson learned: if they ask for feedback, Lie.
    If they say "be honest", continue to Lie.
    If they say your feedback is anonymous, Lie more.

    When I asked a director what the career path is for a developer, he flatly said "Make the AE look good", proving that there is NO place for technical aptitude. Meaning there is NO CAREER PATH for developers.

    They ask for repeatable, reusable code, yet complain that work "may be overengineered". NEWS flash: if you want reusable code, it needs to be engineered more than you think.

    Does any of this sound like a company that is Equal, Willing, Supportive or Nurturing?

    I didn't think so, either. No NEWS is exactly that: no Nurture, no Equal, no Willing, no Support.

    I think the people down in the trenches are great, though.


There are newer employer reviews for Directions Research
There are newer employer reviews for Directions Research

See Most Recent

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