Employee Review

  1. 3.0
    Current Employee, more than 1 year

    Puppy factory

    Sep 16, 2019 - Field Service Engineer in New York, NY
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    They help you learn the industry

    Cons

    Treat you like you are expendable

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  1. 4.0
    Former Employee, more than 1 year

    Good Entry Level Position to Learn

    Jan 28, 2021 - Field Service Engineer 
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    You will learn a lot of broadcasting systems and workflows You will meet different engineers within the broadcast industry You will learn naturally through all the projects Coworkers are knowledgeable and dependable

    Cons

    Be prepared to work long hours and a few weekends here and there Expenses take a while to be reimbursed but I believe that has changed

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  2. 2.0
    Former Employee, more than 1 year

    Nothing has changed, little faith changes will come

    Mar 22, 2021 - Project Engineer in New York, NY
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    - Immediate team members were very knowledgeable about the product and industry and were generally a pleasure to work with. - Lots of opportunities to learn. If you are interested in this industry you can very quickly get exposed to a lot of different technologies and concepts. - The product technology is generally very high-end and cutting-edge; this somewhat depends on the product/department. - Good dedication to agile/scrum practices. Maybe the only well-organized process in the department if not the entire company. - Benefits as a US employee were surprisingly OK given the penny-pinching culture. Decent health insurance plan.

    Cons

    - Opportunities to learn come from being thrown into the deep end with little preparation. The idea of a "ramp-up period" doesn't always exist and it seems random who does and does not get one. You may be on-site solo with customers for weeks or months at a time with little backup from the main office. See below about not saying no to customers. - Pay is NOT competitive. This was true for Canadian colleagues and is especially true for the NYC area. I received a bonus within my first year but it was unclear if it was tied to any specific metric or if it was at the whim of the department head. - Offering 5 days of vacation to start is insulting, and the rate of accruing more days is insulting as well. It's not 1 more day a year, it's 5 more days every 5 years. I negotiated more initial days but the accrual rate was not changed. - Corporate culture of penny-pinching. Expenses took several weeks to be reimbursed normally and being based in the US delayed them even further due to extra bureaucracy. - Bizarre travel policies which clearly stem from the penny-pinching. Minimal ability to set your own travel schedule and no way to state a preferred airline, hotel, or even AIRPORT. You might not know until the last minute if you have a rental car or not. Often had to fly on a cramped private plane from an airport 30 miles outside of the city, depending on the whims of the travel planners. I once had to explain the concept of traffic as part of an expense report. This is not compatible with a role which requires regular travel. - No ability to say no to customers. Little pushback on customer requests to add features or change schedules or priorities, or even to work with them to understand what they want. A 6-month death march phase of a project I was on led to the resignation of at least three employees, including myself. More than a few times I had to fly on said private plane with customers, which I was led to believe was meant to woo said customer, somehow. - Some customers were clearly more important to R&D departments than others. The "rolling release" model was a nice idea but was frequently delayed due to issues affecting specific customers. This made it impossible to deliver important new features or bugfixes to other customers. - Disorganized administration. Frequently had to go through several people to get answers to questions. No idea where I could easily find basic information like policies, employee handbook, etc; if policies changed I would often not find out until I tried to do something that was not in agreement with the new policy. - Poor internal communication. Often had no idea if something was happening which was relevant to me and had to pester people just to find out basic information. When I turned in my resignation and cited the death march project as a major reason, I was told about other upcoming projects which might have convinced me to stay on if I had known about them. - Poor communication between R&D departments. Several teams clearly independently solved the same problems, sometimes for fairly minor things, sometimes for entire product feature sets. - The projects department is more of a software development team than management seems to realize. They need to be provided with the same tools and procedures as R&D teams to be more effective and efficient. R&D is clearly management's favorite child. - Product had very poor documentation. Understood that every customer is different and writing a one-size-fits-all "manual" as such is difficult due to the way some products are deployed, but there is barely any internal technical documentation either. This could be solved with access to the product source code - if I need to understand how something works, at least I could fall back to reading the code - but only a privileged few engineers were granted that access. R&D teams joked about "the d-word". - R&D departments did not always understand how customers used the product which led to more than a few embarrassing moments in front of customers where a bugfix or new feature was completely unsuitable. I don't know if they were unwilling to listen to the project engineers who are the ones actually interacting with customers day-to-day, or if the provided feedback simply never made it to the right people. - The team did not adapt well to having a remote employee. I had to pester everyone from my peers to project management to department heads to include me in communication. - Your experience of and exposure to the corporate culture is clearly dependent on the department and team. I feel lucky to have experienced it at a distance. I think most people who are happy with Evertz are at one of two extremes - they don't work at HQ, or are part of the "in crowd" which fully participates in the toxic corporate culture.

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