Gallup - Great people | Glassdoor
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There are newer employer reviews for Gallup

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Helpful (3)

"Great people"

Star Star Star Star Star
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Project Manager in Omaha, NE
Current Employee - Project Manager in Omaha, NE
Doesn't Recommend
Negative Outlook
Disapproves of CEO

I have been working at Gallup full-time (More than a year)

Pros

Great people dedicated to their work

Cons

Expectations of hours exceeds usual work environments.

Other Employee Reviews for Gallup

  1. Helpful (2)

    "It's amazing for a simple interviewing job"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Associate in Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Associate in Houston, TX
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Gallup full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Upward mobility is there, if you seek it. You can earn a middle class salary by simply doing surveys. Many don't appreciate that comparable companies will pay you half at most than what your potential is there. Plus benefits.

    Cons

    Sometimes don't have time to do the things expected OFF of the clock for engagement; but it is optional, so no sweat. Depends on what you're willing to do in a capitalist society to be rewarded, right?

    Advice to Management

    One thing is the slight spin that seems to be in place on decisions affecting pay. Honesty would be more appreciated.


  2. Helpful (31)

    "An Insidious Place to Work"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Client Service Consultant in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Client Service Consultant in Washington, DC
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Gallup full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    The individuals who recognize the insidious culture of Gallup are wonderful. Not only do they have amazing judgment, but they are also hard workers and good people stuck in a bad situation. Some have become really good friends who I talk to on a daily basis.
    The flexible work schedule is great.

    Cons

    1. Management (particularly client service management): There are two types of management that are causing this issue: 1. senior client service management and 2. all other client service management.
    1. Senior Client Service Management: These individuals work on fear and fear alone. If you’re not the favorite, watch out because this will undoubtedly affect the types of projects you work on and ultimately your bonus/salary. The best test to see if you are one of the favorites is what I like to call the Q12 test, meaning, do you work on small Q12 employee engagement projects (which is mainly admin, or implementation as Gallup likes to call it, and data entry)? If you answered yes to this, then you are NOT a favorite. I suggest you quit immediately.
    2. All Other Client Service Managers: These individuals are highly inexperienced with three years at most of work experience and many have never worked in the field of the employees that they are currently managing. The majority have also only worked at Gallup which exacerbates their complete unquestionable devotion to a company that is clearly shooting itself in the foot. This unquestionable devotion is obviously one reason why these “managers,” or go-tos as Gallup likes to label them, were given the position. These individuals can be molded, they do not speak out, and they never stick up for their employees, unless said employee is a favorite (see below). In sum, these individuals are puppets. I suggest you smile at all times when in their presence, fill your emails to them with positive “!” and “:)” and most importantly, never trust them. They will betray you at every turn.
    2. Culture of Fear: If you are not smiling at all times, or your emails lack “!” or “:),” or your ‘attitude’ reflects anything other than absolute pure enjoyment to be at work that day, then you’re in trouble my friend. Management will quickly label you as “negative” and your career is effectively over at Gallup. Additionally, if you put anything less than 4 out of 5 on your biannual employee engagement surveys, then you should have your resignation ready to go. They say the survey is confidential, but unfortunately that is a massive lie and several people have been let go because they gave low scores.
    3. Favoritism: Every company has favoritism, but the disparity and inequality of both client projects and pay structure between those two groups is the largest I have ever experienced or heard of. The favorites are set up for success by being put on larger clients that are generally allocated more resources. This allows them to get high client satisfaction scores which affects their bonus and pay structure. Conversely, the non-favorites are placed on smaller clients, with minimal resources and little assistance that affect their bottom line. As a result, those who are favored keep rising, while all others see little movement.
    It should be noted that the favorites are not favorites because they have more experience and a greater skillset. The truth is that these individuals actually have a lower skillset and are the least talented in the company. The reason they are promoted is that they never question and do as they are told. This perpetuates the lack of innovation, not only within the company, but also with clients who are ultimately suffering the consequences of Gallup’s underhanded culture.
    4. Zero transparency: No company is completely transparent, but Gallup is in a class all its own, particularly given the current lawsuit brought on by the DOJ. On the outside they continue to tell their employees that the company is financially stable and even growing, but that is a lie. Every day you hear about a new client who quit, or another government project that was lost due to the lawsuit. There are even rumblings of a layoff, but you’d never know it with the all the money spent on renting out restaurants to celebrate one new client being brought onto the roster. We’ll see how long this one lasts.

    Advice to Management

    1. Read “Breaking the Fear Barrier” by Tom Riegers and take some time to reflect on your actions as well as the actions of your peers in management positions. You should all have a copy as it was written by a Gallup executive… ironic, isn’t it?!
    Heck, while we are at it, just re read ALL of Gallup’s management books… and also maybe some other ones too. You guys need all the help you can get!
    2. Stop playing favorites and focus on promoting people based on their skills, talent and experience. You’ll have much happier employees and clients.
    3. Do not tell people what they want to hear when you are interviewing them. Instead, tell them exactly what to expect if they choose to work at Gallup. This lying creates a big issue with new hires and is also contributing to the high turnover.
    4. Stop perpetuating this immature, fake culture filled with rumors, lies and passive aggressive/negative comments said behind phony smiles and emails. Let your employees be themselves weather that be sad, happy, angry, annoyed, bored, busy, overwhelmed. All of these emotions are normal and shouldn’t be me shunned simply because you (management) are too immature, weak and small minded to deal with it!
    5. Do not immediately chastise an employee for making a mistake. I promise you’ll see much better results if your employees are not scared out of their minds that they will be fired for not filling out one form, or entering one data point, out of hundreds, incorrectly.
    6. Stop hiring people with master’s degrees to be consulting specialists. These people are too smart to be doing your data entry and admin work. Plus, from a business point of view, you could hire someone right out of undergrad for a lot cheaper than someone with 5+ years of experience and a master’s degree.
    7. To Potential Hires: I strongly encourage you to NOT accept an offer from this company. They are losing projects left and right, their management acts more like Regina George from Mean Girls, and their reputation is quickly declining. Go somewhere else. It is not worth it.
    8. To Current Employees: Please get out soon. You are better than this and deserve more. Your former colleagues are more than happy to help you get out so feel free to contact us.

There are newer employer reviews for Gallup
There are newer employer reviews for Gallup

See Most Recent

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