GameStop - A fun experience with a door to better opportunities | Glassdoor
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There are newer employer reviews for GameStop

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"A fun experience with a door to better opportunities"

Star Star Star Star Star
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Senior Game Advisor
Current Employee - Senior Game Advisor
Neutral Outlook
No opinion of CEO

I have been working at GameStop part-time

Pros

You talk about video games for a living.
Cheap video games.
Always know when games/collector's editions are in stock and what stores to find them at.
Again, you talk with customers about video games as a job. How much easier can that be?

Cons

Lots of in-store maintenance (alphabetizing games on the walls, price changes, organizing things, etc.)
Low pay until you enter the upper stratosphere echelons of management
Lots of out-of-work research/game experience needed to give the world-class quality customer service the company touts
Tough to find that perfect balancing point between trying to get a customer to spend more money and not seem like a douchebag trying to make them spend money, but help them save money and get the things they need (and don't need)

Other Employee Reviews for GameStop

  1. "Not the job for everyone."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Game Advisor
    Current Employee - Game Advisor
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at GameStop part-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    -The environment can be very fun, depending on your co-workers and your customers.
    -Easy enough job if you know about the gaming world.
    - There are plenty of opportunities to help customers find what they are looking for or to recommend games they might like. Personally I hate selling the power up cards and all that, so it feels good to actually help the customer get what they want.
    - The stores are usually small so it's easy to watch for theft and keep shrink down. This also means the stores tend to get less chaotic and it's easier to clean up during the holidays.
    - Is a great job if you are outgoing. Most of your customers will love to talk and ask lots of questions and are pretty friendly. You will also get all sorts of customers so it's interesting and nice to meet and see all sorts of people.

    Cons

    - The work can become rather repetitive. If you aren't having a busy day (or week) you may just go insane trying to organize the shelves over and over again.
    - You don't really get the training you need. Mostly you will have to ask your co-workers or manager a lot of questions until you get the hang of things.
    - The focus for the employees is to sell the power up cards, get reserves, and sell customers a warranty on items. If you don't do this you can very easily be at risk for losing your job. I also feel like selling them these things, most of the time, is rather unethical because I don't want to push them into something they will never use or don't want. It's hard to please a customer if you have to try and shove a reserve or card down their throat. I definitely think the goal should be to please the customer.
    - Hours for part time employees are unpredictable. The managers never know how much payroll they will get therefore you can get only 4 hours or week or maybe 20. It's probably a good job if you are in school or are unable to work full time, but it definitely will not pay significant bills.
    - Physical copies of games are probably going to stop being made relatively soon, so I don't think gamestop is going to continue to do well for too much longer.

    Overall, I don't think it's a terrible job. I definitely do think it's more suited to an outgoing, friendly person. If you love games but are shy/awkward, this doesn't mean you won't be a good employee but you need to be comfortable around a lot of people, answering phones, and asking if the customers need help with anything. Also, the pay is or is close to minimum wage as a part time GA which can really stink, but time flies buy when it's busy. Not the worst job I've ever had but I do think the company could appreciate it's employees more and focus less on reserves and cards.

    Advice to Management

    Good customer service is so much better than a sales pitch at the register when checking out. If you really want to focus on your customers, make them feel like their business is appreciated - games aren't cheap, and adding on a $15 pro card, a reserve, and warranties, and they're spending way more than they want to. Customers are smart and when they realize they are overpaying they won't come back.

    Also, try and treat your employees a little more fairly. They work hard and are underpaid as it is, but cutting hours all the time or firing them over little things isn't okay.


  2. "Power to the Shareholders"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Store Manager
    Former Employee - Store Manager
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at GameStop full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    -Employees/Coworkers - some of the best I've had at any job
    -You get some really great regular customers
    -Borrowing games was probably my favorite perk as a GA
    -Free games for SM's and sometimes ASM's get swag as well (I should point out these all come from vendors), sometimes even free systems - Kinect sensor a couple years ago, and a Vita most recently. Sony is definitely the best as far as gifts to SM's.
    -Free trip to conference each fall, either in Las Vegas or San Antonio
    -I had the opportunity to go to E3 from a ticket through GameStop; I had to pay airfare/hotel, but still it was fulfilling a dream I had since being a kid.
    -Pay for SM's isn't horrible, especially if you lack a college degree or much experience.
    -It's ridiculously easy to move up in the company to the SM position, as long as you have any amount of work ethic, professionalism, and sales ability.

    Cons

    -Hours. You'll hear this probably from any retail manager, but at GameStop it doesn't matter if it's the dead of summer or an incredibly busy launch or holiday week (nearly every store in my district was notified to cut anywhere from 5-13 hours of payroll from the Call of Duty launch week), expect to get hours cut from your already dismal budget, and you as a salaried SM will be expected to pick up the slack. Typically stores weren't notified of their hour cuts until Thursday afternoons, in an e-mail that reminded you to "cut from your slowest days, not your weekends" - it's impossible when you get notified that late in the week, to not cut from Friday/Saturday. Your part-time GA's will hate the fact that even if they're performing well, they may only get one or two 3 hour shifts a week. If you want to go to the bathroom between 10am and 2pm, expect to lock up your front door with a "back in 5 minutes" sign and hope no customers are left standing outside fuming when you get back. If you have a busy store and can't find a time when you're left alone, learn to work without a morning cup of coffee. For training, there are no extra hours given with the exception of during the holidays (where it's typically a ridiculous 2 hours/person, not even enough for a full shift). If you want to train your employees well, especially keyholders, expect a few 60+ hour work weeks until you and they feel comfortable being left alone in the store.

    -Tasking. Marketing used to be just a few end caps and posters, but in the past couple of years has grown to be huge sections of DLC and best sellers/top games sections, and now rolling "value" towers, making a huge portion of the store just "display only" copies. Creates a huge headache for both customers and associates alike. You're constantly changing out the display cases, sometimes up to three times a week trying to keep up with corporate or your DM's directive, and then you have to explain to customers why you don't have the particular game that they picked out of the Best Seller section and point to the small "for display only" in the corner. It's not fun when a customer starts getting irate over marketing when we don't have the item, telling us that it's false-advertisement or we're trying to bait-and-switch them. Corporate's answer to this is to swap the sold-out cover art with something in stock, but they sure don't support us with the extra hours necessary to keep up on this - they also don't consider the extra time it takes to make sure everything for a sale is set up when there are 3x the amount of places to put sales stickers on an item compared to 2 years ago. On top of marketing, expect a to-do list from your DM every time he makes a visit, sometimes a couple times a week. He may even add in a snarky "good luck doing this while cutting 5 hours by the end of this week" if he's in a really sour mood, as my ASM once told me.

    -Lack of creativity/input. As a manager I know the way to gain respect from your employees is to make them feel valued. Asking your associates their opinions and actually putting their ideas into action and giving them credit when due. A lot of other SM's seemed to understand this as well, but that's where it stopped. SM's have absolutely no creative input in their store, everything is directed down from corporate or your Regional or District manager. It got to the point where SM's couldn't even set their own schedules, working a minimum of 45 hours a week (but being told by your DM that you were slacking if you cut went home at 45) with two set "authorized" shifts - either 8:30am-6pm, or 12pm-9:30pm. While we were allowed to hire our own part-time associates, there were times when full-time ASM's were brought in without the current SM even seeing the candidate's resume or meeting them - a complete lack of respect for the SM in my opinion..

    -Very little upward mobility. Aside from making your way up within the store to a Store Manager position, it's near impossible to move beyond that. Whether it's to a District Manager or exploring your career options at corporate, not even HR seems interested in retaining employees beyond SM level. And who wants to be a SM of a video game store when they're in their 40s-50s?

    Advice to Management

    GameStop isn't the worst place to work by any means, but it's taken a severe nosedive in the past couple of years. Forcing salaried SM's to pick up the cut hours leads to employee dissatisfaction, which in turn leads to burnout. Customers are soon seen as a nuisance, an interruption to our tasking duties, rather than the reason we came to GameStop in the first place. There has been a huge turnover of SM's recently, and without proper support to stores, other employees haven't been trained properly and aren't ready to be promoted. It leads to external hires which doesn't do anything for morale, and eventually new people are training new people.

    Don't think customers won't notice the new hires - I've seen quite a few regular customers move from store to store as managers were shifted around. People go to GameStop for the knowledgeable staff, and that well of people who are personable, good salesmen, and passionate about the products will soon run dry if GameStop doesn't adjust its current methods.

There are newer employer reviews for GameStop
There are newer employer reviews for GameStop

See Most Recent

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