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There are newer employer reviews for Google

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Helpful (6)

"Google"

Star Star Star Star Star
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Intern in Dublin, Co. Dublin (Ireland)
Current Employee - Intern in Dublin, Co. Dublin (Ireland)
Recommends
Approves of CEO

Pros

-Free food

-Very young management and college-like atmosphere

-Google's market dominance and absence of significant competitors

-Potential for high salaries at the higher management levels

-Very smart people

Cons

-Low compensation for the lower positions

-Limited promotion opportunities

-Most people here are over qualified for the type of work they do, resulting in lack of challenge.

-Becoming increasingly bureaucratic as it grows, which means more budget approvals and red tape.

-Hard to diffirentiate yourself amongst all the smart people, making it harder to advance.

-The lower pay in Google is supposed to be balanced out by all the 'perks' provided to you in the office, however unless you think that someone else knows better your consumption habits, you would probably want to have the cash instead!

Advice to Management

Be more open to new ideas and encourage cross-team collaboration.

Other Employee Reviews for Google

  1. Helpful (2)

    "Great internship, but some flaws"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Associate Product Marketing Manager Intern in Dublin, Co. Dublin (Ireland)
    Current Employee - Associate Product Marketing Manager Intern in Dublin, Co. Dublin (Ireland)
    Recommends
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    I believe that Google offers one of the best internships available to students. They not only issue students a great deal of responsibility, they also cater a great deal socially, organising many events (from mini-festivals, to international internship expos, to sea safari's in Dublin).

    During the internship, I had many 1:1 meetings with my manager who offered good advice and feedback about the project I was given.

    Great brand name on the CV.

    Cons

    For my first week, I was given the task of working in the "AdWords Approval Bin" - a place where all automatically disapproved ads are kept and individually screened by Google employees. Many interns were given this for a week or two. Some people apparently spent half their internship doing it. Its not challenging nor stimulating - its very repetitive.

    Although they do give interns big projects, from my experience very few of the projects (especially if they are focused on AdWords) will be implemented. This is due to the fact that most changes to AdWords are typically incremental and only seem to tweak what has already proved itself to be a very succesful product.

    Advice to Management

    From what I heard from other interns, most had secured their position through a referral. This makes it very difficult for anyone without a referral to get into Google, and is unfair.


  2. Helpful (19)

    "It's hit or miss depending where you land"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Free food, cool perks, 30" screen, smart people. Great positive environment if you are in one of the few projects with an excellent manager.
    Brand name: it will help a lot to have Google on your resumé when you'll run away.

    Cons

    Most managers are jokes and if you are not their pet employee will barely know you exist. This mean that on quarterly and annual review your manager will inflate the work done by his favorite employees and strongly back their deserving for a bonus, promotion etc, while having little to say to the committees about the value of your work. If promotions are rare and reserved for a select few, raises are almost non-existent and far below inflation.

    20% time mean you have to sleep less and work more during the week and forget about weekends. The running joke is that 20% percent means you work 20% more time than the current 140% time you spend on a fictional 40h work week.

    Taking vacation lower your performance ratings resulting in lower bonus and less chance for a promotion or raise. Same goes for sick days, parental leave, or even for being unreachable on a weekend (while not on call).

    Some of my coworkers had to complain to HR about their managers and got little support. HR would not recognize any wrongdoing and downplay issues as personality mismatch and misunderstandings. I've witnessed situations unblock with HR only after a VP was contacted for help by the employee.

    Advice to Management

    Get back in touch with the grumpy people, they are saying out loud what the majority is thinking silently. Of course you'll have old timers that are in a niche and know the right people to love how they are being treated, also you have the happy newbies that are not disappointed yet of not being recognized after a full year of hard working. Grumpiness is usually dismissed as 'entitlement' from some employees, but these same employees accepted lower salaries to join Google in exchange for working in Lala Land, of course they are grumpy when they wake up.

    Make the career development efforts real, making bigger promisees without actually delivering real results will just frustrate the employees more. Develop and facilitate exchange programs between roles, but not limited to 10-20 people, that's not how you satisfy 10000 unsatisfied employees. Requiring that you be a top top performer in your current role is ridiculous, if the employees want to try something else it's probably because they not so happy in their current role and not performing at their full potential.

    One way to improve career development and work life balance is to have *strong* incentives for managers to truly support *all* their employees to do 20% time, career development, work life balance. Also force the manager to take their vacation days, instead of setting the benchmark of working all the time. A manager that lose several his direct reports in a few months and unable to hiring replacements should be harshly sanctioned, not promoted.

    Conduct surveys more often, one Googlegeist per year does not seem to help that much when it takes so much time to react and see the results. Open the committees to silent attendants, so employees can see how the process truly works, instead of hearsay and the 'official' guidelines. Create incentives for work/life balance, it's fine to reward the workaholics but too much of it, as it is now, destroys team morale.

    React *now*, it will be too late after mid-september when I predict a massive exodus of under-appreciated talented people. Remember they are amongst the best in the industry and will easily find a place at your competitors even with the bad economy.

There are newer employer reviews for Google
There are newer employer reviews for Google

See Most Recent

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