Grassroots Campaigns - Fun but annoying job | Glassdoor
There are newer employer reviews for Grassroots Campaigns
There are newer employer reviews for Grassroots Campaigns

See Most Recent

"Fun but annoying job"

StarStarStarStarStar
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Former Employee - Flyer in Los Angeles, CA
Former Employee - Flyer in Los Angeles, CA
Doesn't Recommend
Neutral Outlook
Disapproves of CEO

I worked at Grassroots Campaigns part-time (Less than a year)

Pros

Friendly and never yell at you. Guys are really trying to do the best they can.

Cons

It is a profit company that passes for nonprofit :D They hold my check for 3 weeks, And I have to come every week and remind them to give it to me. Wasted a lot of time.

Advice to Management

Try stop being so lax. You guys as lax as laxative

Other Employee Reviews for Grassroots Campaigns

  1. Helpful (1)

    "Expectations Are Made Unclear"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Canvasser in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Canvasser in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Grassroots Campaigns full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    The job is relatively easy and at the same time you feel like you're doing something that makes an impact. The training sessions in the morning are very helpful and get you acquainted to the job.

    Cons

    There is a trial period before you are officially hired and the expectations for that aren't made as clear as they should have been. Beyond the two hours of training in the morning you're expected to go out an collect money from strangers, which can be difficult for many people.

    Advice to Management

    Don't send new canvassers to neighborhoods in cities where passerby are less likely to donate for example big tourist locations and high end shopping districts.


  2. Helpful (5)

    "Terrible. An absolute disgrace of a company."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Assistant Director in Seattle, WA
    Former Employee - Assistant Director in Seattle, WA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Grassroots Campaigns full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    • It's excellent for your social life. A typical canvassing office consists of a large group of progressive-minded college students or twenty-somethings, which is then broken up daily into rotating teams and pairs, who are sent in teams to the various canvassing sites. This prolonged one-on-one or small group interaction combined with the need to commiserate in often-horrible working conditions leads to fast-forming friendships. There are also weekly "socials," events for the entire office with food paid for by management.

    Cons

    Canvasser position

    • The fundraising method is inherently deceptive for many reasons, but mainly because donating online is ALWAYS easier and safer. Yet, canvassers are expected to convince people to sign up with a total stranger instead and be financially irresponsible. The "I want to donate online" response is more common than any other, and there is no discussion or acknowledgement of it within the management of GCI.
    • Besides the insidiousness of canvassing as a fundraising medium, there is far more luck to canvassing than GCI is willing to admit. Canvassing is partially a skill, and there are people who maintain consistent numbers, but to deny the luck element completely (as GCI does) is ridiculous. Once you've built up your canvassing skill set and learned all the subtle ways to manipulate rich suburban moms into donating, at a certain point the variation in day-to-day success depends entirely on luck.
    • Employees face constant, daily scrutiny in regards to their numbers. While I understand the need for regular evaluation, canvassers are ALWAYS blamed for their lack of success when it is usually due to bad luck or factors beyond their control. How exactly can they be expected to raise quota when they're sent to a Safeway in a poor neighborhood (where they get kicked off after 20 minutes because the Director never got permission from the manager)? What about when they're sent to the same post office for the 20th time in a month (with the right-wingers who get increasingly hostile each visit)?

    Assistant Director position

    • The GCI recruitment model in general is completely backward. The company has ridiculously low hiring standards and yet maintain a quota system and rigid “remaining an employee” standards. If they’re actually trying to “build the progressive movement,” shouldn’t it be the other way around?
    • The main thrust of the summer recruitment, the college campus visits, are both haphazardly organized and intrusive on the schools (many of them no longer permit GCI to recruit on their campuses). It's extremely uncomfortable for Directors who are forced to invade these campuses, and it makes the company come off as desperate at best. Think about this from an outsider’s perspective: If I were a college student looking for a summer job (which is insanely hard to find in this economy) and some stranger started handing out flyers on my campus, seemed overly-interested in me, told me I would be a “great fit” based on miniscule knowledge of my work history and educational background, roped me into a makeshift and completely unstructured “info session”/interview, and then hired me on the spot after hardly speaking with me; I would immediately be suspicious.
    • The GCI administration fails to provide critical information to new employees they've hired out of their central office (most of the summer recruits). When I was an Assistant Director in Seattle, those who were hired by central came with zero knowledge of the quota system, the pay structure, and pretty much every aspect of the job. I kept track, and this happened every single time, without fail, as long as the applicant was hired by the central administration. In some instances, new canvassers were given the address of the office we moved out of nearly 6 months ago.
    • Training week. While I did learn some useful things, the sheer intensity combined with the disorganization gave off a strange, creepy, and almost cult-like undercurrent. It seemed like an attempt to brainwash me.
    • GCI seems to want directors to have no lives outside of work and associate/socialize only with other employees. When we want to have even a little bit of time off, we are reprimanded for “not caring” about the cause.
    • There is a disturbing trend in the GCI corporate culture of appeasement of the higher-ups and maintaining the status quo as opposed to the actual clients. I introduced myself at training by saying that I applied because of the ACLU, and I was approached throughout the week by people who identified me as “the guy who likes the ACLU.” Why is it unusual to actually care about the organization you represent?

    Advice to Management

    The level of disorganization, dishonesty, and ineptitude within Grassroots Campaigns is staggering. Stop lying to employees and get it together.

There are newer employer reviews for Grassroots Campaigns
There are newer employer reviews for Grassroots Campaigns

See Most Recent

Work at Grassroots Campaigns? Share Your Experiences

Grassroots Campaigns
  • Star
  • Star
  • Star
  • Star
  • Star
 
Click to Rate
or