Harlan - Overall, it was a pleasant experience. | Glassdoor
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There are newer employer reviews for Harlan

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"Overall, it was a pleasant experience."

Star Star Star Star Star
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Indianapolis, IN
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Indianapolis, IN
Recommends
Approves of CEO

Pros

Some of the best reasons are:
Benefits
Work Environment
People
Stability

Cons

Compensation
Lack of internal promotion opportunities

Other Employee Reviews for Harlan

  1. "Not a bad place to work"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    They provide an excellent benefits package

    Cons

    You are required to work some weekends


  2. "Dont apply unless you want to do everyone else's job on top of yours and can handle dealing with death daily"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Animal Care Technician
    Former Employee - Animal Care Technician
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook

    Pros

    Pay isn't bad
    only work weekends on a once a month rotating schedule
    most work is pretty independant and self paced
    easy to maintain a 40+ hour a week schedule
    Most of the people that work there are pretty nice, fun people to work with.

    Cons

    pay is lower than other companies that hire for the same position, animal cages are often overcrowded and animals are frequently stressed to the point they die and/or resort to cannibalism so if you don't have a strong stomach for pulling out a cage with half eaten mice in it then this isn't a good fit for you, many workers get behind and they rely on the harder workers to carry their job as well as the jobs of those that are absent from work, or simply can't independantly work at a pace to achieve the minimum standard, so you will often find yourself being rushed to get your job done so that you can pick up someone else's slack. A lot of animals are euthanized daily, I often pulled 400+ animals out each day to be put down including everything from pinkie mice to adults from only two units, not counting the dead ones i would pull out that were half eaten due to stress or cannibalism caused by overcrowded cages or starvation after a weekend. I worked in an isolator unit, not a barrier unit, and the isolators are very difficult and physically demanding to work in. You will be attempting to work in a 7 ft tall isolator, standing on a stool with your arms in sleeves that are attached to the unit at set intervals making reaching around very difficult and you are constantly pressing yourself and your face into the plastic side of the isolator to get to the animals. Isolators themselves are in poor condition, consistantly splitting at the seams and getting holes in them, which contaminates the "sterile" environment, the solution for this is taping over the holes on the outside until they can patch it with what is basically hot melted plastic, which inevitably breaks open again within a couple weeks. Basically you are constantly going to be "patching" your isolator, counting animals but the counting does not ever go towards helping in alieviating the overcrowding for the animals, euthanizing animals by the hundreds (if you are dealing with mice), chasing mice that escape the cages (which generally ends in them being euthanized once you catch them), cleaning cages, throwing food on top of cages, and cleaning your unit, then when you get done with yours, you get to do it for someone else. There is no real room for professional growth or pay increases and you will jump through hoops to maintain a "sterile" environment, which is not really sterile at all.

    Advice to Management

    increase the pay to compete with other companies in your industry, find a means to deal with the animal overcrowding problems, as well as the cage security problems and general animal welfare issues. Give your employees more room for professional growth and pay increases.

There are newer employer reviews for Harlan
There are newer employer reviews for Harlan

See Most Recent

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