IBM - All in all a great place to work for with endless opportunities | Glassdoor
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"All in all a great place to work for with endless opportunities"

StarStarStarStarStar
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Accounting Analyst in Somers, NY
Current Employee - Accounting Analyst in Somers, NY
Recommends
Approves of CEO

Pros

One of the best reasons I feel IBM is a good place to work for is they do well in balancing your personal life and your professional life. Management usually works well with you when you need to take time off, there is unlimited personal and sick time (within reason), you also have the option of working remotely when sick and also a couple times a week as well. The majority of people you work with are always willing to help you out and you work together in teams in any job. The networking possibilities there are endless and IBM has a great mentoring program. There is also a great opportunity for growth there and managers work with the staff to make sure you get where you would like to be someday. They offer many tools to help us development.

Cons

Our accounting closes can have some very lengthy hours, but in any accounting profession you will have long hours at some point. Our salary is a bit lower than would you could make in a similiar job in the market however I feel you should also consider the other things IBM has to offer, such as their flexibility when comparing this to other possible jobs out there. The training is not always the best, sometimes you have to pretty much teach yourself the job and finding the correct contacts to use to get information out of is not always the easiest task. To be more specific, accounting works along with finance to find out our drivers, but the problem is there are a lot of finance contacts out there so trying to find the right one can be challenging at times.

Advice to Management

As far as I can tell senior management is doing a great job with the company and they have led the company in the right direction and they continue to lead us into achieving our future goals.

Other Employee Reviews for IBM

  1. Helpful (18)

    "Working at IBM REALLY Sucks!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - SAP Technical Consultant in Atlanta, GA
    Former Employee - SAP Technical Consultant in Atlanta, GA
    Doesn't Recommend

    Pros

    A great place if you want to telecommute, their virtual services are second to none.

    Cons

    Management is just plain incompetent at all levels. You'll never get a decent raise. They expect you to work 80 hour weeks in most cases. You'll get no respect from any level of management and in many cases clients are so fed up with IBM that they are just waiting for their SLAs to expire and then they go with someone else. I've seen it happen over 8 times in the last 5 years. It is absolutely appalling.

    Advice to Management

    Is there any competent senior management at IBM? Hire more H1-Bs, yeah, that'll improve your image. I mean it can't get any worse can it?


  2. "IBM is a very good place to work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - IT Specialist in New York, NY
    Current Employee - IT Specialist in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    IBM has a very structured approach to personal and professional development. A significant amount of resources are used each year for each employee for professional and personal development. If you spend a little bit of time finding out what opportunities are there, you will be rewarded with significant opportunities for career growth.

    As an example, career development is a formal part of your Personal Development Plan. This means that at the beginning of the year you can, and should, find out where you would like to improve either your current professional skills or add new personal or professional skills. This includes things that are not necessarily directly tied to your current career. Now, if you do not go through with most of the training you plan for your self, that counts as a negative in your yearly review. In other words, you have a significant incentive for actually going through with personal and professional development.

    The second thing I like about IBM, particularly after working for start-ups for 10 years, is that IBM has a significant amount of formal process in place for your day to day work, no matter what position you have. This means that you know where you are at all times in any project, and you know what is missing and from whom whatever is missing needs to come. This visibility is great compared to what the situation is like in most start-ups where your visibility into progress on products and projects often is severely limited.

    I also, of course, like the three weeks of paid vacation I get and the IBM health and pension benefits, though no longer as good as they were back in the day, are still excellent compared to the industry as such.

    Cons

    The main negative about working for IBM is tied to one of the positives. Formal process means that you have much better visibility into where you are in the overall delivery situation. Not only that, but since you continuously have to contribute information about your progress, you also get information on the overall progress, so you get a very good view into where you are in the big, and IBM is BIG, machinery. The downside of this is that process, particularly formal process, takes time. Pair this with the fact that IBM is geographically very dispersed, and you will find that you spend a lot more time on conference calls in IBM than in most organizations. This can be an impediment to progress in you "real" work. Once you get used to it you get used to it though.

    Advice to Management

    IBMs main strength and main weakness is the same, the need to create documented, repeatable process. This means that visibility within IBM for the lowly employee is amazing given the size of IBM. I have better visibility into what is relevant for me at IBM than I have had at 30 person companies I have worked for. Given that IBM is 1000 times the size of that, this is an amazing achievement. This is also detrimental to some aspects of IBM. Yes all work should be a repeatable process where, if you lose one cog in the machinery, you can just replace it with an off-the-shelf new cog. The process makes the new cog, unless it is defect, work well enough. I agree with this notion, and therefore with the way IBM handles most of it operations.

    One thing is missing though, an acceptance of the fact that there are "superstars" in the world, and that these superstars perform several orders of magnitude better than regular employees. What is missing within IBM is the ability to seek out, and nourish these superstars. Over time superstars will leave IBM because they will get much more recognition in other organizations. This has an impact on IBM's ability to deliver some things.

    An example is sales, if you can't entice superstar sellers to stay, but you have a good and repeatable process in place for sales, you will probably mostly be able to predict sales numbers and achieve them. You will rarely be able to blow them out of the water though. Blowing out numbers is a task achieved by having a smal number of superstars on your team that bring in those surprising, but usually very large deals.

    This also goes for other aspects of work. IBM has more patents than anyone, but at the same time IBM has it self developed fewer revolutionary new things and turned them into massively successful products than the size of IBM and the number of patents should indicate. This is due to the fact that product development superstars, the ones who come up with crazy wonderful ideas and sell millions of them, are not nurtured well enough within IBM.

    In short, when you have a lot of process in place, people will become more concerned about not messing up the process, that is, by not making mistakes, than about doing brilliant things. My advice would be, try to foster a culture that does not punish people for making mistakes but that rewards people, significantly, for doing brilliant stuff. This means that there must be significant room for individual rewards.

    My previous company had a flat 10% comission for sales people if they met or exceeded quota, and the quota was achievable. There was no ceiling on the commission. That meant that if a sales person closed a $20 mill deal, the company cut him a $2 mill commission cheque. In IBM that sales person would never get anywhere near $2 mill, but then again, he would probably not work for IBM, and therefore the $20 mill deal would not be there.

There are newer employer reviews for IBM
There are newer employer reviews for IBM

See Most Recent

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