IBM - Great company with great professional talented team. | Glassdoor
There are newer employer reviews for IBM
There are newer employer reviews for IBM

See Most Recent

"Great company with great professional talented team."

Star Star Star Star Star
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Former Contractor - Contract Recruiter in New York, NY
Former Contractor - Contract Recruiter in New York, NY
Recommends
Neutral Outlook
Approves of CEO

I worked at IBM as a contractor (More than a year)

Pros

Work life balance with great compensation. Solid technical tools to get the job done. They hire solid talent so you grow your career along with being super productive with shared business goals.

Cons

Can be variable in recruitment space as projects vary in closure. Part of any recruitment company in terms of being adaptive. Overall, great experience during my couple of years.

Advice to Management

None.

Other Employee Reviews for IBM

  1. "Very good for beginners then run for the exit if you can"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Program Manager (Like Everyone Else) in Raleigh, NC
    Current Employee - Program Manager (Like Everyone Else) in Raleigh, NC
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at IBM full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    The younger new hires are generally very bright and dedicated and truly want to excel to the best of their abilities and ambitions.
    A good opportunity for new grads to get good initial experience and skills up to speed.
    The fact that nearly everyone in the US works from home is a time and money saver and frees you up to live wherever you like.

    Cons

    It's a company run by lawyers and accountants not software or technical people or even IT people.
    Pathological levels of micro micro micro management and 'metrics'.
    The process by which you have to do something is more important that doing something.
    No increases or promotions, ever. Not ever. Whatever you are hired at, that's it. Get used to it.
    No money for training even if it's local and forget about travel to training or professional and peer conferences.
    There is no upper limit on bureaucratic paperwork and people you have to go to get the least thing done.

    Advice to Management

    I would scrap the entirety of HR and simply approach all new hires with a 2 or 3 year employment contract.
    Let almost all of middle management go, through attrition. Most of them are more desperate and fearful than competent since you've created a culture of fear and micro management. No one does more than it takes not to get fired for the most part and they lean on process like a crutch.
    Do away with all job reviews - almost all of the annual goals and objectives are written by your first line manager word for word anyway, and most of them are boilerplate nonsense. When it comes time to 'review' your annual results, no one's getting any raises, nor could the goals and objectives ever be used as an objective base for them if IBM ever gave out money so the whole thing is painful for everyone. Managers spend their time apologizing for no return on anything you've ever accomplished. It would be smarter to make the tiny sliver of people who actually GET raises to go back and document their accomplishments - that way in case there's a dispute later you have a record.
    In house deployment of websites, portals and 'communities' is absurdly disjoint, scattered and impossible to use. All you're creating is tribalism. No one can find or use the least thing outside of their own department and most first and second line managers PREFER that because it allows them to hoard information.
    A global company is only as good as the people all over the 'globe' can communicate with one another and that's where you fail miserably. You rope people into long boring pointless status meetings which for people outside the US if often in the middle of the night. And not to put too fine a point on it, accents really DO matter.
    Stop adding layers. 15 years ago I was 5 levels from the top. Now I'm about 11. You have people in charge of people and organizations they have earthly clue about and none of us have ever heard their name or would recognize them in the street. And the only reason they get to manage these organizations and people is because you worship the spreadsheet and the Powerpoint. And now, every executive has a social app, a webpage and a feed. Who cares?
    Your senior managers seem arrogant and inconvenienced when THEY volunteer to step down to talk to the groundlings. So don't do it. No one believes what they're saying in the first place. Just rip a page from the speeches or Mussolini or Deepak Chopra and be done with it.


  2. "Interesting place to work. Some of the smartest people around."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Database Developer in Dallas, TX
    Former Employee - Database Developer in Dallas, TX
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at IBM full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    You have the ability to work with people all around the world and learn so much. You will have access to test and try all of the cutting edge technology.

    Cons

    You have to manage your career. I found managers who are willing to help. However with IBM going mostly mobile in the US. It is hard to keep up these relationships. Being part of a global team was fun but still need to have the office experience.

There are newer employer reviews for IBM
There are newer employer reviews for IBM

See Most Recent

Work at IBM? Share Your Experiences

IBM
  • Star
  • Star
  • Star
  • Star
  • Star
 
Click to Rate
or