Intuit - One word: DILBERT-VILLE | Glassdoor
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There are newer employer reviews for Intuit

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Helpful (5)

"One word: DILBERT-VILLE"

StarStarStarStarStar
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Product Manager in Mountain View, CA
Current Employee - Product Manager in Mountain View, CA
Doesn't Recommend
No opinion of CEO

Pros

Work Life Balance, Stable Company.

Cons

Politics. Clueless pointy-haired managers and architects who hide their incompetence behind "process" and politics.

There are good technical folks in the engineering ranks who do a great job but as a product manager it is very difficult to get things done because the numskulls in architecture and middle-management can neither lead, support or get-out-of-the-way.

A side-effect of clueless leadership is that they have no idea how to evaluate risk and take on challenges. As a result, there is a CYA mindset, and politics is winning over competence.

Advice to Management

You think Merlin is dead? The cancer is back and it is called Atlas. You have great engineering talent but the managers are completely clueless, and the architects are taking you down the hole again. Their roadmap is a joke - I have spoken to other people in the program and they admit in private that it is not going well - but the current leadership is more interested in keeping the program alive than in doing the right thing to fix it.

Other Employee Reviews for Intuit

  1. "Intuit, an OK place to work."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Software Engineer in Orem, UT
    Current Employee - Senior Software Engineer in Orem, UT
    Recommends
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Good pay and a stable company.

    Cons

    Big company, too many rules, not quick enough.

    Advice to Management

    Fire the architects.


  2. Helpful (7)

    "Move along, nothing to see here but naked emperors"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Online Support in Tucson, AZ
    Current Employee - Online Support in Tucson, AZ
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    Intuit employees have much in common with pheasants on a game farm. The keepers provide food, shelter, veterinary care, and protection from predators. In return, the healthy but idle pheasants endure the boredom of captivity and run the seasonal gauntlet of shotguns.

    That isn’t necessarily a bad thing. As far as pay and benefits for full-time employees are concerned, Intuit is arguably one of the best, if not THE best employer in this one-horse town.

    If you’re happy with just food and shelter, you’ll love it here. Benefits for full-time workers include competitive pay with bonuses, generous paid vacation allowances, excellent medical, dental, and vision care, 401k matching, stock purchase plan, tuition reimbursement, fitness center and game room, fitness reimbursement, a clean and secure work environment, free coffee, tea, and cappuccino, 25-cent sodas, and a whole slew of other perks too numerous to mention. The company wholeheartedly supports diversity, and for the most part your fellow employees are nice, laid-back, and sane.

    Cons

    On the other hand, if you’re yearning for meaningful employment, if you’re weary of busywork and corporate BS, then move along, there’s nothing to see. Cynicism and burnout runs rampant at Intuit, and the longer you work here, the worse it gets. I’ve noticed that the happiest Intuit employees are the ones who either turn a blind eye to all the hypocrisy and BS, or generate heaping piles of it themselves. If you can convince yourself that your buck-naked Emperor wears clothes despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary, you’ll do well. And if you can convince others, you’ll thrive.

    Over the last 10 years, I’ve watched Intuit morph from a fun, rather quirky company to a bland, top-heavy, boring corporation. It started in 2000 when another company overran Intuit like a column of army ants engulfing a sloth that had chosen the wrong day to fall out of a tree.

    In the name of “building a high-performing organization”, dead-weight workers were quickly replaced by dead-weight directors, managers, analysts, and similar muckety-mucks from the other company. Intuit provided a vast new expanse of virgin Lebensraum to this other company’s castoffs. The invaders brought with them strange new terminology like “process excellence”, “six sigma”, “black belt”, and “DMAIC”, reinforcing the widespread notion that Intuit was under occupation by unwelcome foreign troops.

    During the occupation, Intuit’s once-legendary customer service took a distant back seat to the all-mighty dollar, as evidenced by the wildly unpopular TurboTax product activation scheme and poorly-trained, barely coherent support reps. The Praetorian Guard regime installed a seemingly inexhaustible string of unstable, psychotic directors and managers, many with connections to the other company. These human tornadoes barged in, laid waste to their departments, and bumped off many valuable employees before ultimately getting fired themselves. The survivors got stuck with the cleanup.

    In all fairness, Intuit has righted many of these wrongs. In my business unit at least, there is a concerted effort to implement suggestions from both customers and agents. Customer satisfaction with our product, support and service is at an all-time high. The tools we use for our everyday work have improved drastically. The wild and wacky directors, managers, analysts, and other "crazies" that once infested Intuit have mostly retired or moved on to greener pastures. But Intuit is still inhabited by a small but powerful cadre of hacks with deep ties to the other company, who earn rewards for cost-cutting measures that look good on paper.

    The ratio of managers to employees who actually do work is still way too high. Despite this, micromanagement is rare because managers are too busy attending online meetings while they tweak the PowerPoint presentations required to justify the next block of online meetings. It’s common for workers to report to multiple managers, and it’s equally common for managers to be completely clueless when it comes to knowing what their workers actually do all day long.

    Intuit wallows in BS. Brace yourself for mixed metaphors like “it’s in our DNA” instead of “it’s in our genes” and “solving for the Big Y” when every 6th grade algebra student knows that you solve for X, not Y. The corporate drones who parrot the oft-repeated phrase “True North” can barely handle a dollar-store compass, let alone explain the differences between geographic versus magnetic North. This constant misuse of scientific terminology exposes these town criers for what they really are – imitators, not innovators. It speaks volumes that lower-level, frontline employees rarely emit this blather unless they’re trying to impress (or mock) management.

    Layoffs occur regularly, but Intuit is hardly unique in that respect. Layoffs are merely symptomatic of a much more sinister problem – Intuit’s summertime reorganization (“reorg” for short). In addition to providing a convenient excuse get rid of long-time employees who, ah, make a little too much money, the reorg satisfies upper management’s annual urge to Do Something. Departments and teams are reshuffled and renamed, people disappear, and of course more managers are hired. The joke around here is if you don’t like your manager, wait 5 minutes.

    The reorg also has a significant but underappreciated negative effect on employee productivity. Before and during “reorg season”, employees are reluctant to continue working on existing projects, let alone start new ones, because the reorg may very well render the whole thing moot. You might spend months seeking and finally gaining support for your sexy new project or idea, only to watch it go out the door along with your newly-unemployed sponsor. Employees have been conditioned to give up after experiencing the inevitable annual letdown year after year after year. Is it any wonder formerly productive, engaged employees turn into frustrated, bitter, burnt-out hulks who resign themselves to doing the minimum amount of work required to keep their jobs?

    Even after the reorg, employees continue to mill about unproductively because they’re applying for new positions, waiting to hear if they got that new position, training and adapting to their new co-workers, reshuffling workloads and responsibilities, attending dozens of “shared vision” meetings with their new departments, trying to figure out who is now in charge of what, and/or waiting for their new managers to get up-to-speed. Not to mention the annual ritual of filling out your pointless Goal-Setting Form, where you want so badly to write "My goal is to get a nice severance package". Enormous amounts of time are spent engaged in nonproductive, secondary work while waiting for the dust from the reorg to settle.

    To sum it up, the successful employees at Intuit are the ones who eagerly agree that their naked Emperor is fully clothed, or at least pretend not to notice his conspicuously dangling you-know-what. Employees unwilling to do that can either speak the truth and risk being labeled as negative non-team players, or keep their mouths shut and risk being labeled as unengaged non-team players.

    Advice to Management

    Please, cut the BS and stop reorganizing so much. We want stability and straight talk. Thank you.

There are newer employer reviews for Intuit
There are newer employer reviews for Intuit

See Most Recent

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