MSCI - good for old boys club, not good for anyone else | Glassdoor
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There are newer employer reviews for MSCI

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Helpful (1)

"good for old boys club, not good for anyone else"

Star Star Star Star Star
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY
Doesn't Recommend
Disapproves of CEO

Pros

Good office locations, good benefits, access to leading edge financial research, access to clients where you can network. Indices business is a cash cow.

Cons

MSCI strategy to create shareholder value is to build low cost operations in low cost countries like India, Mexico, Budapest and Oklahoma. There is a lack of trust in staff. Onerous process driven culture inhibits creativity. Seniority resides with former Morgan Stanley guys who have no new ideas and aren't going anywhere. Overall it's a depressing environment.

Advice to Management

Trust your employees, empower your employees and create a vision to where the company is going strategically.

Other Employee Reviews for MSCI

  1. "cool place to work"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Norman, OK
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Norman, OK
    Recommends
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    People are friendly and nice

    Cons

    the way of treating people is too tough now

    Advice to Management

    Treat people better


  2. Helpful (11)

    "Unhealthy environment altogether"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Associate in Berkeley, CA
    Former Employee - Senior Associate in Berkeley, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    - Wages above average, if you don’t count the 30+% overtime you will be asked to put on it
    - Decent year-end bonuses
    - Offices are usually in prime locations in the financial capitals (although relocation and travels are discouraged)
    - Attractive health care coverage, average 401k retirement plan
    - Established reputation among customers
    - Respected research team, especially in Berkeley and Geneva

    Cons

    - Lengthy interview/hiring process; this will mislead you thinking they know what they are looking for: quite the opposite
    - MSCI is a software and service company that heavily rely on engineering, although it is very difficult for an engineer to have a voice heard at strategic level in order to contribute to the execution strategy of what designed and planned
    - MSCI is unable to retain talents they so carefully selected from the market. They say they only retain the best, more often they only retain who can’t have chances elsewhere
    - The company is in constant turmoil struggling to keep up with the CEO’s aggressive growth strategy based on merger and acquisitions. This reflects badly on the human capital causing high turnover rate affecting overall operations, customer service, product development, ultimately affecting competitiveness on the market
    - Management is largely inadequate and ineffective: senior managers (mostly Morgan Stanley dropouts) seem busy on keeping the status-quo while trying to land safely to hefty
    retirements; junior management is, on the other hand, highly unfit, under trained and in many cases sycophant (ie "yes-man") while facing their boss and arrogant while facing reports
    - The company shows incapable of elaborating and promoting a single culture throughout the global locations; this causes frustration and sense of exclusion on the many and lets
    some overly zealous managers assuming tremendous decisional power without the necessary checks and balance mechanisms.
    - The company is missing a global strategy for the Human Resources:
    a) Training is reduced to the minimum required by regulations
    b) Training for skill improvement is largely unfunded as budget for training is either minimal or non-existent
    c) Managers completely lack the role of career mentor for their direct resources with the result that people feel “stuck” in a position without possibility of moving on to another functions
      As a result people burn-out and quickly move on to another companies when they can.

    - Politics, rivalry and “prima donna” attitude common on some “empowered” managers (London office), are festering the company feeding anger, frustration and setting teams and offices against
    each other.
    - Top managers and officials are too distant from the life of the company as if they don't want to be bothered , and mid-level managers inadequately deals with the reports in a sort of antagonist (as opposed to a collaborative) way
    - Managers fail to help and empower associates in doing their job: micro-managing and lack of delegation contribute to quick people’s burn-out.

    Advice to Management

    The integration process with Riskmetrics and more recent acquisitions is showing by far more challenging than just consolidating office space and network links.
    The integration of products is lagging and your promise of saving $50M in 2 years (2010-2012) in operational costs does not appear in the right course.

    Clearly the strategy of the integration process is not executed well; sadly your inner circle of Morgan Stanley expatriates managed to cash in a hefty reward for a task having still uncertain outcomes.

    It is time for you to reconsider the work of your COO since front and back office operations have been clearly under-achieving in spite of the many HR directors, product managers, and IT directors rotated in the last few years.

    Others need to be held accountable (including the so called engineering team in Hungary) for badly copying and poorly implementing the Morgan Stanley IT model at MSCI (one size
    does not fit all).

    Give a clear signal of renovation to the market and sever your long-time ties with Morgan Stanley and your cronies: they are part of the problem, not part of the solution.

    It’s time to slim down the management, you owe it to your investors other than to the people of MSCI; even Morgan Stanley will appreciate that.

    You can’t keep MSCI’s balance sheet shining just with financial tricks and M&A’s; this will only buy so much time if you don’t start working on the consolidation and evolution of your products.

    Recent FY10 filings show MSCI is less competitive Revs per employee vise (-35% of Operational Revs/employee, FY10/FY09, and -40% of Operational Income/employee, FY10/FY09: sluggish revenues over a ballooning headcount) and it is in way more debts then it was right after the initial IPO.
    How are you going to address this?

    How far you think you can go before the market comes back and gets you if you don’t start working on the real asset of your company: your people.

There are newer employer reviews for MSCI
There are newer employer reviews for MSCI

See Most Recent

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