Microsoft - Sophisticated workplace exclusion | Glassdoor
  1. Helpful (1)

    "Sophisticated workplace exclusion"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Director in Redmond, WA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Microsoft full-time for more than 8 years

    Pros

    Great benefits. CEO/Satya who cares about the work environment for his employees or at least is visible in vocalizing that. Human Resources less so - pretty standard, protect the status quo and current leaders mentality.

    Cons

    I worked in Redmond in Windows/E&D. As a highly educated and senior leader who is a woman of color, I felt repeatedly excluded by the white women in my organization, particularly those with historical/seniority status. They had very subtle exclusionary behaviors that can’t be “written up.” Examples include: talking about me behind my back, which I heard from another colleague; discounting/ignoring my contributions... and ideas; greeting only each other in the office and not initiating social conversations with me; seeding doubt about my project outcomes and timelines by telling the executives that we weren’t going to hit our timeline and budget. Meanwhile, my white female counterparts gave themselves generous overages on completing their pieces both in time and budget. In my history of working for multiple companies and work environments, I have never felt so invisible, devalued and disrespected than at Microsoft.

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    Advice to Management

    Take employee complaints seriously, even if you hear them through the grapevine and not directly. Employees don’t feel comfortable going to HR which is seen as highly biased protector of the status quo. I get it, HR professionals move up the chain by protecting and advocating for the leadership.

    Microsoft2019-06-13
  1. "People First Company - Both with Customers & Employees"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Software Engineer 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Microsoft full-time for more than 8 years

    Pros

    Excellent people, inclusive environment, ability to grow at your pace - fast or slow.

    Cons

    Some teams can be worse than others - there's no way to know until you join. Compensation could be better.

    Microsoft2019-10-18
  2. Helpful (1569)

    "Thoughts after 10 years...."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Redmond, WA

    I have been working at Microsoft full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    1. If you love tech, this is a great place. No doubt you'll talk tech (mostly the MSFT stack) from enterprise to consumer - from PCs to phones to Xboxes - from datacenter to desktop. 2. What were GREAT benefits are now VERY GOOD (took a small step down) but still probably better than you'll find at 99% of large corporations. If you've got family - the value of the benefits is even higher. 401k match is nice.... 3. Even with it's struggles MSFT is still a cash printing machine. This means if you can keep your nose clean and do reasonable work, you can have a stable job, pay your bills, feed your family, and not worry (too much) about layoffs. The stock you own likely won't tank, but probably won't go up much either. You'll get a bonus each year and some stock. It's a decent life if you aren't looking to light the world on fire.

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    Cons

    Brand on Your Resume: After many years of losing market share and struggling to be at the front end of innovation and the fact that there's 90,000 employees, don't think MSFT is necessarily going to be attractive on your resume to more agile and smaller companies. Managing Your Career: Make you say this out loud so it registers - 90,000 employees work there. Double that for vendors. It is VERY hard to "stand... out" and move up in the company. Don't expect your manager to be much of an advocate or enabler to help you meet your career goals - they are basically trying to survive the stack rank every year too. Not familiar with the stack rank? Check out the 2012 Vanity Fair article called "Microsoft's Lost Decade".

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    Advice to Management

    I'll type it here - but I don't they are listening... 1. Help proven talent move laterally in the company for new opportunities. 2. Kill/evolve the stack rank. Here's basically how it's viewed:. 30% of the company gets 1s and 2s - and they are happy. 50% get 3s and that basically feels like getting a "C" in school. This sucks for talented people when a multitude of UNCONTROLLABLE conditions keep you from... getting into 1 or 2 range. The 20% getting anything below a 3 are walking dead. In summary, 70% of the company walk away from the review cycle feeling like crap. This is no good. After 10 years, I'm leaving - it's just a matter of time until I find the right opportunity. I need to find a company spends 90% of it's time building technology experiences, as opposed to 90% of its time building PowerPoints. And I expect to refuse the exit interview - because if you really cared what I thought, you wouldn't ask me after I decided to leave.

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    Microsoft2013-01-29

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