Morgan Stanley - Okay experience. Everyone works hard to make it through the day. | Glassdoor
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There are newer employer reviews for Morgan Stanley

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"Okay experience. Everyone works hard to make it through the day."

StarStarStarStarStar
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Intern - Intern in San Francisco, CA
Current Intern - Intern in San Francisco, CA
Recommends
Neutral Outlook
No opinion of CEO

I have been working at Morgan Stanley as an intern (Less than a year)

Pros

-great experience
-learn a lot about finance
-actually got to sit down and talk with a client

Cons

-poor career development
-seemed like they don't care about your ideas

Advice to Management

need a better internship program

Other Employee Reviews for Morgan Stanley

  1. Helpful (1)

    "Potentially outstanding company, unfortunately tends to fall short."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Vice President
    Current Employee - Vice President
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Morgan Stanley full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    - Work/Life Balance is great (if you ask for it and make your expectations clear)
    - Strong overall talent pool
    - JV platform is an excellent platform especially once the major push for fixes was completed
    - Development Opportunities (if you push for it)

    Cons

    - Compensation: Most employees have not gotten a raise outside of senior management or employees very well connected to senior managers
    - Bonuses: Despite strong quarters in recent times, the company has not distributed bonuses to rank and file in lieu of base compensation increases
    - Turnover: Firm will pay 50% more for an unproven external hire which leads to longer tenured employees leaving. Significant loss of intellectual capital in this process.

    Advice to Management

    At some point, compensation will need to be increased for staff. Currently, the practice is to only increase on promotions (and even that is waning), or as a counter offer for an employee who has a new opportunity. Recently more and more frequently, these counters have been refused even when the counter was greater. This is in part due to the lack of bonuses and the recognition that "if money is available now, why wasn't it during year end comp discussions?" It leaves a horrible feeling throughout the firm and no work/life balance or education opportunities are going to make up the fact that a good portion of the workforce is underpaid by industry standards. Some of the best advisors and financial professionals work for this firm, it should be an honor to be employed. However, until talent is compensated at a top notch rate, we will always be considered lesser to our competitors.


  2. Helpful (3)

    "The Training Program is a Con"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Financial Advisor Associate in Dallas, TX
    Current Employee - Financial Advisor Associate in Dallas, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Morgan Stanley full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    MSSB has one of the best brands in the retail brokerage business

    Cons

    Look, becoming a financial advisor a la Morgan Stanley, Merrill, et al is at best a daunting task. However, ask yourself, how do these firms profit from month after month bringing in FA trainees knowing full good and well that only about 1 in 10 make it five years and only about 2 in 10 even make it to 18 months? The answer: Trainees don't cost much. Getting new clients, even for established FA's is getting harder and harder. The "financial advisor" profession is way past saturated. Secondly, the biggest trend in the profession is for FA's at the brokerage firms to either go purely independent as fee-based RIA's, or at least go to a much lower cost/higher payout platforms such as LPL. Sooooo, what about our trainees? Well, even the worst trainees are going to bring in one or two or so good accounts before they self-select out due to not making much money or the firm fires them for not hitting sales goals. And, who gets those good accounts when our trainee leaves MSSB? You got it, the established brokers get them, NOT struggling new FA's. Put another way, the training programs are nothing more than client acquisition programs for the established FAs. Giving these guys the accounts is one of the ways the traditional brokerage firms try to keep them from bolting to greener pastures. In the meantime, our trainees are back on the street trying to find real jobs. The only trainees who ever make it are those who have either family members or a big rolodex of close acquaintances who will give them substantial money very soon. If you are not in that category, remember: You are expected to bring in a few good accounts reasonably soon and then leave the firm. In short, the best outcome for the brokerage firms is for trainees to become big producers. But, that's not the plan. If it were, do you think the failure rate would be anything approaching 90%? Really? No, the second best, and by far the most likely outcome, is for you to bring in a few good accounts and then leave the firm as soon as possible. It's a very cynical model and is just one example of why the traditional retail brokerage firms are continuing to lose market share to just about everybody else. Even retail prospects/clients are beginning to ask questions like "Why am I paying so much in fees and commissions?" "What the heck is my performance and how does it compare to an appropriate benchmark?" Those are not questions the Morgan Stanleys of the world want to hear. But, for job seekers, just understand, it's a rigged game. Morgan Stanley, Merrill, UBS, et al have a perverse, short-term model that is designed for you to fail. Although they are encouraging FAs to go to fee-based models, it's simply in their DNA to view all prospects/clients as nothing more than a source of revenues. In fact, all you really have to know is that the only thing... the only thing.... that they grade all FA's on is how much money they make off of every client. so long as they don't break any regulations.

    Advice to Management

    Wake up. If you like watching your margins continue to compress and your market share decline, then keep this bizarre model going. If you're at all serious about operating in something resembling an ethical fashion, hire sales people to bring in clients and portfolio managers to manage the money. Stop pimping trainees to serve as your client acquisition department.

There are newer employer reviews for Morgan Stanley
There are newer employer reviews for Morgan Stanley

See Most Recent

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