Employee Review

  1. 1.0
    Former Employee, less than 1 year

    Opt Out! Do not work here!

    May 15, 2018 - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    Your colleagues (anyone who is not included in upper management) are your lifeline. They are the only reason I survived at this job. They are all in the same boat as you, and they all want out.

    Cons

    If you don’t have time to read this entire review, the main thing you need to know is this: Do not work here. From day one, I knew something was off with this institution and its management. As a determined, motivated, and creative professional, I was eager to jump into my work and contribute something beneficial to the office environment and the Museum as a whole. I came in willing and excited to learn about the Museum’s mission, content, and culture. I soon learned this was not going to happen. As an office employee, I was forbidden from stepping foot into the Museum proper. There was never an orientation to help familiarize me with my place of work. Even in the most extreme circumstances, where my job description called for me to take a walk from the office to the Museum (two blocks away – not far), I was reprimanded for leaving my station. The most time I ever spent in the Museum during my tenure here was during the Museum’s half-baked 5th Birthday Party, where I brought my friends to test out some of the exhibits – many were broken, and most of them were confusing and taught us nothing about math. With over four years of experience in many different museums and cultural institutions, it was an embarrassment bringing my friends to this Museum. In an effort to try to learn more about the Museum’s content, the best I was given were instructional videos, created by the Executive Director and original Founder of the Museum – let’s just say these videos were pretty useless. The hysterical part of all of this is that one of my job responsibilities was to man the phones, and field questions from the public about the Museum and its exhibits. Without proper training, the best I could do was adlib and make up information as best I could. Another brief responsibility was working with school groups to organize their field trips. Again, without proper knowledge of what a field trip actually looks like at this Museum, without experience witnessing an educator session, and without ever meeting the Museum Floor Staff members, I shuffled through this responsibility as best as I could. All-staff meetings were a joke (a venue for the Executive Director to tell pointless stories and to gobble down some ice cream), and did not include the Museum floor staff. However, the worst part of this job was its demoralizing and demeaning nature. I was hired for a new position, and my job responsibilities never came to fruition. From day one, I was told to “sit tight” as projects would come my way. They never did. Even as I made suggestions for possible work I could do for myself, I was constantly told to just wait it out. Suggestions were never welcomed, and often times, seen as me “pushing back.” I was often taken aside and told that “this might be a recurring problem,” and that I had to watch the way I was addressing my concerns. While it might sound great to get paid for doing nothing, for a professional with a work ethic like myself, it was deadly and eroded my confidence! When handing in my letter of resignation, I had to finally admit to my employer that I was, indeed, actually doing very little work during my 40 hour week. If he was surprised, shame on him, because I had made this quite clear throughout my time there, and sought out ways to remedy the situation. There was absolutely no room for creativity, autonomy, decision making, or brainstorming when it came to my job (or the job of any of my colleagues). Whether this is your first job out of college, or you are an established professional with decades of work experience, if you are not part of management, you will be treated like garbage. Staff is made to feel uncomfortable if they need to ask for a bit of flex time and there are only THREE sick days a year! There is no trust in this office – the minute you receive an e-mail from the Executive Director or a VIP, the Chief of Staff comes running to your desk to ask if you’ve answered it, inferring he does not trust your ability to do your job on your own without his micromanaging. When we began to receive customer complaints, rather than listen to the staff to understand why customers were complaining, we were thrust into a useless “customer training” seminar. The problem wasn’t how we dealt with the customers, it was the horrible answers we were told to give them. No trust! In the most humorous event of all, I was not even trusted to put together a plate of food for one of my absent colleagues without the help of my Chief of Staff. After two hours of waiting for him to come out of a meeting, I then had to stand by and “help” him put food on a plate for a fellow employee – really, this means I watched him fight with the plastic wrap. Whenever I even so much as said “I believe” or “I think,” regarding a work related decision, I was told “Who do you think you are to have the authority to make that decision.” This was a frequent phrase tossed around to many of my colleagues, when they were only trying to make suggestions. After several months of this treatment, I “shut down,” shut up, and relegated myself to acting on the stupid decisions made from above and, when possible, search for another job. Management definitely caught on as it was common practice for many in the office, and amended company policies to blatantly state that looking for another job while at work was not okay. The fact that they took the time to update policy, but not the time to address the problem, is very classic MoMath. Whether you are exempt or non-exempt, your time is not respected. You will be asked to “work” special events (in quotations because many times I just stood at these events for no reason, with nothing to do). Because these extra hours may push you into overtime territory, and because they don’t want to/won’t pay you overtime, you are given your time back – sounds good, except you will be receiving your time back in 15 minute increments throughout the week! If you worked an extra 3 hours on Monday, be ready to come in to work on Tuesday at 8:00 am and get 15 minutes of “free time” added to your lunch, your day-end, and so forth throughout the rest of the week. 15 minutes is the equivalent to a train delay. Even employees who contributed countless hours to the creation of these successful fundraising events had their time disrespected. A direct quote from management: “the purpose is not to give you usable time.” You will also have no ability to manage your own time. In a specific instance (I had to leave 15 minutes early one day), I came in early and e-mailed payroll and my Chief of Staff to notify them that “I have come into work 15 minutes early so that I can leave a little early today.” The response? “While 15 minutes is not the end of the world, in the future, please speak with me first because YOU DO NOT WANT TO GIVE OFF THE APPEARANCE THAT YOU CAN MAKE THESE DECISIONS ON YOUR OWN.” Management, management, management. Of all the employees that work at MoMath, I was one of a handful that actually had any prior Museum experience. MoMath (due to the Executive Director’s prerogative) is run as an elite boys club, and while their mission might be to “make math fun and accessible” for everyone, they really only care about brown-nosing to the rich and powerful. The Board of the Museum does not care about how the office or the Museum is run, and only cares that it “looks cool” to have their name and money in something called the National Museum of Mathematics. Past and current employees have made it clear to HR, the Board, and management that the running of the Museum and the treatment of staff is NOT OKAY, but the Executive Director continues to sit on her throne. The use of funds is absolutely horrendous, and as an advocate for education and museum education, I was appalled to see how money allocated for students was being used. And because Title I and low-income schools received free or reduced-cost trips, we were told that it was okay to jerk them around because they weren’t paying customers. There is honestly too much to say about this horrible job and horrible place in one review. I find that every time I begin to talk about MoMath, I remember another horrendous occurrence that I forgot to mention the last time. I would suggest reaching out to any past employee and asking about their experience before even applying to this Museum. We are ALL more than willing to fill you in on any missed detail.

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    21 people found this review helpful

Other Employee Reviews

  1. 5.0
    Former Intern, less than 1 year

    Great Intern Program

    Aug 27, 2020 - Perspectives: the MoMath Summer College Volunteer Program 
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    Interns learn a lot while participating in different parts of the museum's operations. Learning how to interact with visitors while on the museum floor is good experience for any customer service oriented role. Interns have many opportunities to learn a lot about math while working there.

    Cons

    It has some of the typical downsides of non-profits but as an intern this has minimal impact since interns aren't there for very long. It would be nice if they paid interns something but they are a non-profit so they don't have to.

    Be the first to find this review helpful
  2. 1.0
    Former Employee, less than 1 year

    Run away as fast as you can

    Oct 20, 2020 - Interpreter in New York, NY
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    The coworkers are great people and make it somewhat bearable.

    Cons

    Upper management (Cindy) treats her employees horribly, and it's her way or you're fired (or have lots of barriers set up in front of you that force you out). Everyone starts here thinking, this is such a cool unique opportunity and a great mission, excited to engage the public with math in a fun way, and break down the barriers for children to see math isn't hard or scary; but quickly everyone who works there (literally, everyone, and it's no secret amongst floor staff) gets disheartened and disappointed very quickly. Personally, I was treated horribly, personally targeted and values much less than my male coworkers, after I had the audacity to stand up for myself and not take being mistreated and used. For a non-profit, Cindy cares an awful lot about personal profit, and there are even rumors of tax fraud and evasion circulating around her, along with more recent accounts of racism and classism (of which I can also attest to from my time there). I read negative reviews before accepting the job, and thought hey all disgruntled former employees leave bad reviews, but seriously, if these negative warning reviews can save even one person from entering into such a toxic environment I will be glad.

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    5 people found this review helpful

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