National Park Service - Landscape Architecture Internship | Glassdoor
There are newer employer reviews for National Park Service
There are newer employer reviews for National Park Service

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"Landscape Architecture Internship"

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  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Intern - Landscape Architecture Intern in Springfield, MO
Current Intern - Landscape Architecture Intern in Springfield, MO
Recommends
Neutral Outlook
Approves of CEO

I have been working at National Park Service as an intern (Less than a year)

Pros

Had a great experience getting to know the workings of one of the parks, WICR. Was able to work on projects that were later implemented.

Cons

Have no complaints, great experience - the location was the only drawback

Other Employee Reviews for National Park Service

  1. Helpful (5)

    "Well-respected, mission-driven agency, poor work-life balance"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Park Ranger - Interpretation
    Current Employee - Park Ranger - Interpretation
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at National Park Service full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    Being a real national park ranger is a pretty rockin' job. You get a lot of respect from the public, and chances are, every day you do something really meaningful for present or future generations. Most rangers are extremely qualified, unless -of course- they were hired under "special" hiring authorities.

    Cons

    Must sacrifice personal relationships to move up, as promotions are rarer than diamonds and moving up generally means moving across the country. Cohesive teams are harder to come by as highly qualified rangers with years of experience are losing jobs to "preference eligibles" with no experience. This basically means that there is a gigantic failure of the hiring system at a national level. Plan on volunteering or interning, then working seasonally for years before ever getting a non-temporary position with benefit, and even those generally come with long or indefinite furloughs and no park housing/ridiculous commutes. As someone who hires seasonal rangers, it is a nightmare to sort through the system, we receive hundreds of qualified applicants in one massive alphabetical list. We have to hire veterans/preference eligibles first if the meet the most minimum qualifications. If none of them accept the job offer, we can see the list of non-veterans - 90% of which are totally over-qualified with tremendous experience and skills. If you really want a particular job, contact the boss directly to make your name stand out.

    Advice to Management

    The hiring system is a failure, and there is NO effective effort to retain the service's best employees. Morale is lousy in most parks, as few employees feel they are rewarded appropriately for the work they do, and nearly all feel that they can't compete fairly for jobs due to the veterans preference rules in place. Find ways to hire, retain, and support the most qualified people, and - just maybe - morale will get better. Also, provide managers and employees training on dealing with PTSD. While some veterans are cool, some are loose cannons with little skill to handle the high-stress of constant personal interactions with the public and their peers. Disciplining them can be formidable due to fears of legal backlash or a hostile work environment.


  2. Helpful (2)

    "Great mission, interesting work, bad retention strategies"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Park Ranger
    Current Employee - Park Ranger
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at National Park Service full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Mission-oriented. Friendly people. Interesting work... And you may even go outside occasionally!

    Cons

    Mission-oriented agency means a LOT of people are willing to do this work for vastly less than they deserve, which is why as an agency our positions are under-graded and often temporary with no benefits.

    Advice to Management

    Focus on employee retention and on bringing in new, bright people. Breaking into the NPS is a nightmare these days and while I did it, the number of incredibly gifted people I've seen passed up is the primary reason why I'm looking to leave myself.


There are newer employer reviews for National Park Service
There are newer employer reviews for National Park Service

See Most Recent

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