Nielsen - Challenging career opportunities | Glassdoor
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Helpful (3)

"Challenging career opportunities"

Star Star Star Star Star
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Systems and Operations in Chicago, IL
Current Employee - Systems and Operations in Chicago, IL
Recommends
Positive Outlook
Disapproves of CEO

I have been working at Nielsen full-time (More than 10 years)

Pros

People are left to solve problems and design solutions for clients.
Senior leadership has a good understanding of the industry and communicates the strategy to meet objectives.
Senior leadership has a wonderful philosophy on supporting the remote work force so the only people who understand their jobs and work independently can work from home. The people who show up at the office are typically those who don't have much real work, so going to the office in and of itself becomes the 'job'.

Cons

Nielsen is a process heavy company where often content is the problem. It is not realistic to think you can achieve a solution through project management when the people on the project do not understand the problem.
We have some fundamental problems in our core factory that need to be addressed to achieve long term objectives. At some point, we need to make the investment and fix the problems. When we do, we will be far more capable of meeting our client objectives and drive significant long term profitability.

Advice to Management

Senior leadership has fallen into the trap of 'outsourcing' as a solution in and of itself. The problem is that you can't expect an outside organization to solve problems senior leadership does not fully understand.
See the point above under cons. Make the investment to fix problems in our core data factory and reap long term gains.
In the question below on Dave Calhoun, I'll vote thumbs down because he runs the company for short term profitability. He also relies a lot on Mitchell Habib for advice. See my point above under cons. Mitchell wants to throw millions of dollars at outside consulting companies to solve problems they do not comprehend. Cut the spending to consultants and let the employess who understand the problem work out the solution.

Other Employee Reviews for Nielsen

  1. Helpful (4)

    "Not for Everyone"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Recruiter in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Recruiter in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Nielsen full-time

    Pros

    Good starter job mainly for the benefits, which, if full-time include car, laptop, Blackberry, insurance, gas.
    Good introduction to corporate heirarchy
    Work from home

    Cons

    High burn-out rate and turnover
    Review system obsolete
    No training for job safety where reps are expected to cold call in dangerous neighborhoods
    Door to Door in many cases assigned in poorly determined areas/under construction or demolished
    Quota system unrealistic depending on territory

    Advice to Management

    Spend more time in the field
    Revamp review system
    Review quota system to include allowances for variables in population


  2. Helpful (3)

    "Fragmented, jack of all trades, master of none."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Client Manager in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Client Manager in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Nielsen full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    Salaries are ok, but nothing extraordinary. Not much stress, but not much motivation either. Nielsen has become more professional than it used to be, but there are still a few fundamental issues.

    Cons

    Nielsen offers too many products & services, and client-facing personnel are expected to learn how to sell and/or use each one of them. This results in a climate where people know enough to be dangerous, but not enough to be truly respected by our clients. I wouldn't doubt if Nielsen spins off some of them. They've been in acquisition mode for a long time, but it can't last.

    Another con is that they engaged in an outsourcing initiative a few years ago, trying to identify "low level" work that could be done by TCS personnel in India. The idea is fine, but in practice it's rather lacking. The problem is that TCS has little day-to-day interaction with stateside personnel, so a gap exists that hinders understanding of objectives & needs. This forces us to use a detailed order form to request their assistance. And when they complete their work it needs to be proofed, and often modified to be more client-presentable (due to grammar, knowledge of client issues & culture, etc). So it often takes more time than it would if you had done the whole project yourself. So now Nielsen is paying for 2 individual's time, when it could have only paid 1.

    At most other consulting firms, there is a staff of junior analysts or interns available, right here in America, and you could simply call them or walk over to their desk and say "Hey, you remember that project you did last month, could you do it exactly like that but for a different brand", and they would understand exactly what to do, without needing an order form telling them. And their output would be more client-ready due to a better understanding of English as well as domestic custom. Not to mention that these analysts would provide a steady pool of promotion-ready personnel. In contrast, the average TCS person only sticks around for 18 months, from what I've heard.

    Also, Nielsen has developed many presentation "templates" over the years, that are supposed to take data and plop it into a standardized deck. The problem is, most of those templates are very unprofessional looking. I'm talking simple things like grammar, and making sure that the margins and font sizes are the same on each page. They would never pass standards at Accenture or McKinsey or all those other consulting firms Nielsen hopes to emulate. The same goes for many of the sales and training decks. Many of them look really amateur.

    Advice to Management

    Stop trying to apply General Electric organizational models on a business that lies within an entirely different industry. Promote internal people who already understand how to do things, instead of hiring external candidates just because they worked for an impressive CPG or consulting firm. And hold mid/senior managers accountable for applying leadership skills, not just managerial skills. There is a difference between a manager and a leader. Managers merely delegate work and keep track of deadlines. That's not adding much value. To be a leader, you also need to inspire your team, motivate them, and recognize them. You also should have experience doing the type of work your subordinates do, so that you could help out in a crunch.


There are newer employer reviews for Nielsen
There are newer employer reviews for Nielsen

See Most Recent

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