PayPal - eBay's rich banker cousin is sorta cool, but he's not for everyone. | Glassdoor
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There are newer employer reviews for PayPal

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"eBay's rich banker cousin is sorta cool, but he's not for everyone."

Star Star Star Star Star
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Former Employee - Product Marketing Manager in San Jose, CA
Former Employee - Product Marketing Manager in San Jose, CA
Recommends
No opinion of CEO

Pros

It's the growth engine for eBay and there's a lot of investment from the execs in growing PayPal even faster and making it stronger. PayPal's in a very dominant position in the online payments industry, which is definitely a plus. There's also a lot of cool projects for products in mobile, developing countries, microfinance, etc.

The people are smart and motivated, and they have some of the eBay friendliness to them. I found everyone to be very helpful and open when I requested their time to get input on products I was researching.

The benefits are great, even pet insurance. I rode the CalTrain down from SF and they subsidized that and picked everyone up with shuttles.

Cons

It's in San Jose. It's nice for some people but not for me. For my personal life i wanted to live in SF, and that meant a 2 hr commute each day on the Caltrain, or i could have done the 101.

It's a big organization. If you're used to getting things down quickly with little overhead then this place can be stifling. There are many layers of management to get through to get anything done.

Finally, it's a bank. When you boil things down that's what it is. So from a culture standpoint it's a bit confusing. People are friendly but not that fun (like their eBay counterparts).

Advice to Management

focus on User Experience

Other Employee Reviews for PayPal

  1. Helpful (1)

    "One of the best companies in Silicon Valley"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in San Jose, CA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in San Jose, CA
    Recommends
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    The people are really for the most part quite nice and very smart. I think that PayPal is just at the beginning of it's success. I want to be part of this phenomenon as it becomes more main stream.

    Cons

    The Development cycle is extremely long.

    Advice to Management

    Be more transparent with your teams. Trust and empower your teams to determine goals and deliver them.


  2. Helpful (19)

    "Come for the paycheck, leave for any semblance of job satisfaction."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software QA Engineer in San Jose, CA
    Current Employee - Software QA Engineer in San Jose, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    -The benefits are ok, probably the only real positive when comparing a big company like this to a sweet little startup where you'll be given fun and interesting challenges, and where people speak in human languages and not in acronyms and corp-speak.
    -The salary is fair* (it was good but now it's stagnant... they suspended salary increases and bonus').
    -It's changing a lot with all the off-shoring, and the ever worsening work conditions which have triggered an exodus of the best and brightest, but still there are some genuinely decent co-workers (mixed in with some genuinely-not-so-decent butt-kissers)
    -Managers, their sycophants, and those outside of the technology organizations look like they have a pretty good time. When reading other reviews pay attention to job titles and you'll see how most engineers skew towards the un-happy side of the scale, and those in other organizations seem to be far more content with PayPal employment. Also, if you're considering this place for your next empoyer, read the eBay reviews as well... they are the company that owns us, and their culture is fast encroaching on ours.

    *you can look up the salaries, and those not in california will probably consider them very high. But cost of living here is pretty brutal, so those of you scoping this place out for a possible move would be well advised to look into how expensive this area is.

    Cons

    -Being owned (anchored) by eBay
    -Being a financial institution and not a software company in how we are run (Scott Thompson is a former Visa guy, so he's pretty much destroyed the silicon valley vibe the company had and driven off the more creative and brilliant rank and file developers.)
    -Our customers generally resent our draconian policies and fees (read articles with comment sections, anything related to PayPal or eBay - PayPal's parent, and you will see how much venom people spew at us... and if they weren't so right, I think it wouldn't weigh so heavily on my sense of job satisfaction.)
    -Salary freeze (even though we at PayPal delivered double digit growth, being part of eBay meant the company as a whole didn't do well, so we all get punished)
    -Getting eBay options (we recently fell into the single digits, while Amazon, eBay's closest competitor has been soaring up into the 70's – nullifying the excuses our executives keep blabbing about the economy being the cause – when everyone in, and out, of the company knows it's the direct result of our incompetent management.)
    -Having a board of directors that doesn't fire the head of eBay (read the eBay reviews to see how much he's reviled by our co-workers over on the eBay side of the company.)
    -With billions in the bank we had a layoff which was totally unnecessary, yet just because other companies are doing it, the clown-show-exec-staff decided to shrink the teams... then go on a shopping spree to buy Paylater for more than a billion. This is what I hate, times are tough and they figure they can do anything they want and people aren't in a position to quit... Well, sadly they might be able to do so now, but they're paying a high cost in terms of morale, and retaining the best of the best (who can find work in any economy.)
    -Having process' and procedures piled on all the time. Doing ANYTHING is an oversize in frustration at PayPal.
    -The corporate Network is slow... really slow (we're a high tech company!? really????)
    -Most of our tools are sub-par, and sluggish
    -Getting any suggestions to percolate up through the lower management filter to higher levels is impossible
    -Bonus' (back when we actually had them) were tied to shared goals... that are NEVER fully met. Many of my co-workers look at the most prominent of the goals, which is known as A.T.B. (average time to business) as a simple scam to limit bonus payouts. Nice to know that we grunts, who work like crazy get chiseled out of our bonus' by the multi-million dollar bonus earning clowns up top.
    -Metrics collection and "meeting the numbers" frequently will interfere with getting the real work done
    -There's ever increasing demands that we do more, in less time... unless you brown nose your way into a cozy relationship with your boss, you get no concessions for the extra time and efforts.
    -To summarize, PayPal is a very frustrating place to work. I've decided I'll hold this job a while longer (while the economy is so crazy), but as soon as things calm some, I'm going to fire this company and find a place that isn't so infested with incompetent management, and which isn't so completely obsessed with keeping everyone burried in process' and pointless side tasks.

    Advice to Management

    -Fire each other. Seriously, it's absolutely sad how much management we have, and how completely ineffectual a vast majority of our "leadership" actually is. Ask ANY current employee how often they see managers doing anything other than meeting with other managers then coming back with further ways to over-complicate the work flows, and frustrate the individual contributers.
    -Upgrade the playgrounds/stages/feature pools, and network.
    -Upgrade the tools we use - making functionality, speed, and ease of use primary considerations, not metric gathering as is the current rule
    -Simplify the release process
    -Stop changing the release process every release
    -Size projects better, we push too much, with too many bugs, not beacause we code, or qa badly... but because there's not enough time for people to do a craftsman like job. We have a rush everything strategy which results in too many live site bugs, too many emergency bug fixes, and too many emergency feature requests. Changing the live site shouldn't be such a casual activity.
    -Take a look at the scheduling that's being done, and re-done, then modified, then re-modified, and ask yourself why we plan like this. We spend innordinate amounts of time doing crazy stuff, which takes away from our primary duties, which suffer like crazy because we play games like this.
    -Consider not off-shoring so many of our jobs.
    -Get over the obsession with automation. I know you fantasize about having scripts which don't draw salaries instead of engineers who do. But look at the reality of what you're pouring into this ineffectual tactic. Automation is a nice supplemental strategy, on a limited scale.

There are newer employer reviews for PayPal
There are newer employer reviews for PayPal

See Most Recent

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