Quill - Good, solid company | Glassdoor
There are newer employer reviews for Quill
There are newer employer reviews for Quill

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"Good, solid company"

Star Star Star Star Star
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Former Employee - Marketing Manager in Lincolnshire, IL
Former Employee - Marketing Manager in Lincolnshire, IL
Recommends
Neutral Outlook
Approves of CEO

I worked at Quill full-time (More than 5 years)

Pros

Good people, solid company, flexible work hours

Cons

Shallow structure, not a lot of room for growth once you reach a certain level

Advice to Management

Invest in training

Other Employee Reviews for Quill

  1. "Great and enthusiastic experience"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - QA Analyst in Buffalo Grove, IL
    Current Employee - QA Analyst in Buffalo Grove, IL
    Recommends
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Quill full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    They have a very good teamwork and great support from the Managers. Fast paced environment and a lot to learn.

    Cons

    not much. I Like to be challenging.


  2. Helpful (4)

    "Confused"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Qsd in Lincolnshire, IL
    Former Employee - Qsd in Lincolnshire, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Quill full-time

    Pros

    Executive leadership seems to have a solid understanding of what we need to do to succeed. Generally, the people are pretty decent.

    Cons

    The "managers" in the middle have no idea on how to drive the ship. I have worked for some managers I haven't seen eye to eye with, but through mutual respect we've been able to achieve company goals. At Quill however, the Sales Director is so married to "Selling Time" that he is effectively destroying the sales department and the sales teams know that. Calling your customers is very important, however expectations of 3-4-5 hours only teaches an Account Manager to call the customers that they know will talk to them. This leads to less effective selling time, and more empty conversations on the weather, the garden, or any number of useless conversations I've heard 1000 times a day.

    There is no such thing as respect in this company. If you are in sales, you are looked down upon from the rest of the organization. If you are an Account Manager, you are a completely replaceable piece and do not have a valuable opinion. If you are a Specialist, you are a completely forgotten part of the business. Bottom line, you will be treated like a child unless you are in management and then they only pretend that your opinion matters.

    Account Managers are not allowed to manage accounts here, which garners them completely ineffective when looking at the big picture. They are not allowed to do any administrative tasks for their accounts, in fact some are threatened with write-ups if they are calling customer service or other departments on behalf of their customers as it takes them away from "Selling Time".

    The Account Managers are spread way too thin. With some 600 enterprises on average between them, they have no real ability to impact positive change in their base.

    Account Managers are not incented to sell. Their compensation plan is impossible to earn great pay, even if they are growing their base more than their goaled expectations. The only real incentive for anyone to pick up a phone and sell something, is so they are not written up for not hitting their "Sell Time" expectation. In fact, I have seen multiple Account Managers placed on performance plans for not being on the phone enough, all while exceeding their expectations in sales quotas.

    Don't be fooled when you are offered the position and when that offer letter shows an annual salary... It is actually an hourly wage. Oh and since the parent company isn't having good years, you are not allowed any overtime. I have seen many instances where employees either have to clock out in the middle of a sales call and continue to work off the clock, or tell the customer that they will have to pick the conversation back up the following day/week because they are at 8 hours or 40 hours.

    Advice to Management

    First, I would drop the Sell Time requirements and start rewarding Account Managers that develop business from the bottom of their base. Next, I would at least hire 5 more Account Managers per team to thin out the bases. This would give Account Managers more ability to develop the business that is already in their base. Next, I would get rid of the level of management just above the TMs. They lack the vision necessary to move Quill forward. The continuation of doing the same thing while expecting different results seems to be their mantra. Their actions, words, and communication has created a rift from the Account Manager to the company as a whole which is unrepairable.

    Promote and hire people with outside influences and ideas. The company remains stagnant because there are no tenough people in a decision making position that can bring ideas other than what has been the status quo. Diversity is a hell of a thing, and can impact a business positively more than people knocking their heads together passing back and forth the same ideas over and over again.

    Trust your associates, and treat them like the adults that they are. They have signs up in places saying to not touch items, some in "management" have yelled at sales people for eating cookies that weren't for them (but yet were sitting for multiple hours untouched). Treat your employees like they are a valued part of the puzzle, value their ideas, their input, their expertise. Invest in the people that touch your most loyal customers, and they in return will invest in the company.

    Be transparent. You should be transparent with sales numbers for all departments. Be transparent with future plans for the department and company, the Town Hall's are a great avenue for this but direct leadership becomes hush hush on anything else.

    Great companies are great to their internal stakeholders as well as to their external ones. Your customers hear the satisfaction the sales team has in the company. Your sales staff will only do as much as necessary to not be fired when they are unhappy. Create a great enviroment for people, so they want to succeed for you.

There are newer employer reviews for Quill
There are newer employer reviews for Quill

See Most Recent

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