RealPage - Multiple growth opportunities | Glassdoor
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There are newer employer reviews for RealPage

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"Multiple growth opportunities"

StarStarStarStarStar
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Carrollton, TX
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Carrollton, TX
Recommends
Approves of CEO

Pros

I have been able to work on many different projects in the last few years, seeing almost all of them to completion. Love the challenge of the workplace.

Cons

Fast moving company with high degree of change required to support multiple acquisitions and multiple markets. Customer focused service model can have lifestyle implications.

Other Employee Reviews for RealPage

  1. Helpful (1)

    "Smoke and Mirrors, More Cons than Pros, The Name Truly Does it Justice"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Marketing Associate, Third Class in Greer, SC
    Former Employee - Marketing Associate, Third Class in Greer, SC

    Pros

    For the most part, you always know what to expect. Call after call, very scripted for the most part. You'll say you're in the "central(ized) leasing office" so many times you'll be saying it in your sleep -- literally. Decent, drama free work environment with the downside of a terrible, congested commute if you work the 9 to 5.

    Cons

    Little to no opportunity for promotion except in the "Career Path," which requires you to attend about 20 to 40 hours of unpaid class time while completing about double the reading time in preparation for each class...also unpaid. You do get a raise after moving up the career path, but it is often delayed due to needless bureaucracy. The bonuses you get for good performance are decent, but rare because good performance is defined as a score of anywhere from 95 to 100% on "shops" which are demanding team lead/QA assessments of your call performance, where you can fail simply by saying too many "uhs" or sounding a little under the weather, which brings up the flipside, you get placed on performance warning or an OTI - opportunity to improve. There are more acronyms here than the US military. In terms of truly being promoted and moving up in status vs. just getting a raise, there is little opportunity. Middle and upper management is very cliquish and it's a promote from within within (repetition intentional). People in those positions play musical chairs and gain new titles quickly.

    Advice to Management

    Training needs significant improvement. The TACS (another acronym) have good intentions, but actually need to learn how to teach rather than just assess. The training process needs to be retooled from crawl, walk, run...as it currently is, to walk ---> sprint. There needs to be more practical teaching of the software rather than classroom/POD academic theory. Instead, the first week and a half of training is theory, then you are thrown to the wolves with an unfamiliarity with the software but expected to perform swimmingly to pass the "gates" or exams, the passing score of which seems to change. 90 is a high bar to pass for someone completely unfamiliar.

    "Shops" need to be completely redone. Each shop needs to be reviewed by at least two persons qualified to do so, as well as another Marketing Associate who has satisfactory shop scores. These scores should be averaged to calculate the final score. Peer review would be a valuable improvement provided the MAs are not acquainted. When a shop is done by only one person, be it a TL, TLA, QA, etc., there is significant room for arbitrary and capricious deduction of quality points. Also it is not exactly clear the point breakdown of the shop in it's entirety. For example, there are 30 or so points for customization, the sell, etc., but it is unclear where the rest of the points come in to get to 100. A better rubric is needed so that the MA clearly knows what is expected of them and can improve.

    Also, the ability to call the communities directly needs to happen -- without pressing a code, which is often incorrect. The only way, at times, that you can get a caller the accurate information they need in order to set a visit or secure a site-unseen application is by answering their questions definitively rather than the standard disclaimer that you're in a central leasing office. As an MA I had so many lost opportunities because I couldn't reach the onsite team for the answer to a specific question that was of utmost concern to a prospect. While the PK profiles are excellent, they need to be updated and evaluated on a regular basis to resolve ambiguities. For example, Washer/Dryer options are often confusing, some floor plans are not even viewable, and with "Level One" pricing vs. Vaultware, etc., pricing and availability is vague.

    I would rather have more responsibility and leeway and be paid more than to do what is currently done and be paid less. It is very frustrating when you have to explain time and again to a prospect unfamiliar with the inner workings of the multifamily industry the rational behind pricing and why there is a range. Most think they are looking at and getting a single apartment.

    The No Smoking policy is well intended but short sighted. Allow for a designed smoking area on the corner of the property and you won't have people overextending their breaks and falling out of adherence because they have to drive off campus to take a quick smoke break. Institute smoking cessation programs as well.

    Free up the computers so that MAs can access the internet for limited work related purposes. It is frustrating when you want to look at a community's website or another website with the prospect so you can understand what they're talking about yet the firewall/filtering proxy won't let you. Also allow windows messenger to be used to open the lines of communication, rather than just email, which is very glitchy with the web interface.

    Also end the phone rings. We wear headsets for a reason. The endless cadence of ringing phones in the room is enough to drive someone mad. Make the ring tones come across the headset, not the phone itself.

    Add more computers to the main building break room. Only have 3 computers per 150+ employees is ridiculous. It is nearly impossible to check your email on your break because there is a crowd gathered waiting to use the computers during peak times. At least 7 computers would be ideal.

    Alot of the short calls/non-leasing calls could be curbed by setting up clear menu options before calls are forwarded. For example, callers need to understand the difference between actually leasing up a home vs. inquiring about one, and to be directed accordingly. This can save L1 time and the management companies money.

    Here's a nice idea for an added fringe benefit -- work some connections to get employees discounts on local apartments, perhaps with companies that are L1 clients! Consider more flexible schedules, like a voting system each schedule cycle where MAs can approve their schedule or make small changes to it before it is finalized. If they fail to do so, the schedule stays the same. TotalView rarely if ever takes preferences into account, even for seasoned, senior employees.


  2. Helpful (12)

    "Awful, horrible, would never recommend"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Awful Place to Work in Carrollton, TX
    Former Employee - Awful Place to Work in Carrollton, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Cubes are large and have sliding doors
    Relaxed dress code
    Salary was within industry norm

    Cons

    -"Good ol' boys club" is the best way to describe management
    -Management is demeaning and plays favorites
    -Management does not understand the term "soft skills"
    -Not flexible with scheduling - working from home is frowned upon
    -Location is out in the middle of nowhere
    -Expectation that you work 24/7
    -Yearly user group which takes 2 months of planning and preparation, all while doing your "normal" duties; no time-off granted even though the user group begins on a Sunday
    -Ridiculous amount of unnecessary meetings, leaving no time to do your "normal" duties
    -Management does not understand the concept of work/personal balance
    -Must take PTO for ice storm days versus working from home
    -Market themselves as a software company yet no one in management has a true software background (they all come from property management). The one manager who had a software background was fired as he tried to improve the process which would have made others at his level look foolish
    -People crying due to how management treats them is normal and something you see on a daily basis
    -HR is not confidential
    -If you don't come the property management sector, you are an outsider
    -People do not respect one another
    -Lots of bottom feeders that have been with the company for many years that do nothing and they have been prompted to positions they are not qualified for simply because of number of years they had been with the company
    -Very unorganized
    -7 days of PTO a year (plus standard holidays)
    -Management uses intimidation as a way to get things done
    -If you don't have PTO and you get sick, you are fired (no way to borrow PTO or have an unpaid sick day)
    -Implemented a "must be to the office by 8am" rule in order to weed people out
    -Poorly integrated products and constant bug fixing because the developer talent is the bottom of the bottom as all the smart ones start finding a way out the first day they are there
    -Unable to retain talent as products are so bad (bug fixing, poor integration)

There are newer employer reviews for RealPage
There are newer employer reviews for RealPage

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