Rubicon Project - Great place for senior developers; Incredible perks; expect overtime on big projects | Glassdoor
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There are newer employer reviews for Rubicon Project

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"Great place for senior developers; Incredible perks; expect overtime on big projects"

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  • Work/Life Balance
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Former Employee - Software Engineer in Los Angeles, CA
Former Employee - Software Engineer in Los Angeles, CA
Recommends

Pros

Rubicon is truly the leader in what they do, and they do it WELL. Their marketing and customer support groups are top-notch, and the engineers work like crazy to meet expectations and adapt to changing market conditions to get the highest-quality UI/infrastructure into clients' hands.

The perks at this place are unbelievable: free lunch, free dinner if you work late, stocked pantry, free beverages/snacks, lots of 'happy hour' events, quarterly team outings, quarterly all-company outings, free car washes, dry cleaning service, 'swag' (shirts, bags, sweaters, right down to pens, notepads and license plate frames), great location (filming set of first season of '24'), great salaries (at least for engineers, don't know about other roles), decent benefits, cell phone reimbursement, games area (pool, ping/beer pong, Wii/XBox, darts, basketball, softball league). Employees are also given a $75 gift card to spend on other employees as a rewards program.

Definitely a 'family' vibe, and communication from upper management is always great. For the engineers, pair programming and scrum were introduced in 2009 and it was a huge success.

Cons

The $75 rewards program tends to be popularity-based -- if you don't stand out in the crowd, don't expect your coworkers to lavish you with thoughtful gift ideas -- if you're a known hero in the company, expect lots of little gifts.

If you're an engineer, expect long hours. You may or may not get time off in lieu of unpaid overtime, but that's at the discretion of your team lead / manager / VP. "Domain knowledge" was an issue for a while but it's getting better, but be careful that you don't get stuck working solo on a project. They try to avoid the 'cowboy' mindset of going off and doing things on your own, yet allow certain employees to do exactly that with no consequence.

Engineers have been put on vague "performance reviews" with unrealistic goals, which seem more like "we want you to quit so we don't have to fire you" and have lost a few great programmers that they weren't happy with. Another engineer burned out and resigned after nearly two years of being the only guy on a major piece of the system (despite asking management for help) and it started affecting his health. Being stuck in "fire-fighting" mode for so long made him write sub-par code over time, and took several others almost two months to refactor his code.

New ideas are always welcome, but ultimately, the 'product' group will decide what projects the engineers will work on.

Actual performance reviews were non-existent until the summer of 2009, and even those weren't very thorough and no pay raises were given; but then again, they already pay engineers very well, so I wasn't too concerned about not getting a raise (perks make up for it too!).

Advice to Management

Management needs to make serious moves to ensure that cowboy mentality is not allowed within the company by ANYONE (no matter what their position/seniority level), and that no favoritism is ever shown for that sort of behavior.

More steps need to be made to ensure that a decent development / qa / staging / qa / production platform is in place for all areas of the system including automated unit tests. Make sure no one person can bring the company to a crashing halt because they're the single point of failure.

Recognize overtime better, and be more open to time off in lieu of the extra time and effort that engineers put in. Recognize heroes better, mentor employees better (especially with unit testing), and get rid of those vague "performance reviews" if you're not happy with an employee's performance.

Do something about the rewards program so people don't feel left out while others reap tons of free gifts because they're more popular within the company culture. And how about fewer parties with alcohol? Not everyone's a drinker. And if an employee has to miss a quarterly outing, offer them a substitute event to attend so they don't feel left out.

Other Employee Reviews for Rubicon Project

  1. "Business Analyst"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Rubicon Project full-time

    Pros

    Great culture, people, technology, and locations.

    Cons

    Stay focussed on the industry and trends


  2. "Rubicon Project internship"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Database Administrator (Database Administrator)
    Former Employee - Database Administrator (Database Administrator)
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Rubicon Project (More than a year)

    Pros

    free food and catering
    nice office
    friendly co-workers

    Cons

    not much room for growth

There are newer employer reviews for Rubicon Project
There are newer employer reviews for Rubicon Project

See Most Recent

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