Statoil - Spending dollars saving pennies | Glassdoor
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There are newer employer reviews for Statoil

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Helpful (2)

"Spending dollars saving pennies"

StarStarStarStarStar
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Mechanical Engineer in Stavanger (Norway)
Current Employee - Mechanical Engineer in Stavanger (Norway)
Neutral Outlook
No opinion of CEO

I have been working at Statoil full-time (More than 8 years)

Pros

Statoil have a relatively flat organization where one as an employee can handle projects quite on your own as long as you deliver and show results. I.e. leaders will not interfere too much which I appreciate. If you have a solid knowledge of your specific field and is secure on yourself, you can do a difference. My personal experience is that my closest manager gives me free reins with what I do.
Working hours are like in Norway good (regulated by law), and you can normally decide how you use your time. If you have a sick child, nobody will raise their eyebrows if you're home to take care of your child. So if you're a young professional starting in this industry, Statoil is a good place to get experience.

Cons

To much money is spent on wastless studies by external companies because project leaders don't have enough broad knowledge and thus don't trust internals with the required background. This leads to what I like to call decision paralysis requiring even more studies!
Statoil have a lot of technical requirements, which is typical for the oil industry. However there is a resistance to change these when knowledge shows that it should be done.
Now Statoil wishes to save money by saving pennies instead of saving dollars. This is done by taking away benefits we have had like fruit baskets (from a company for people with disabilities. Social responsibility?), food assortment in the cantina etc.
Restrictions to travel is another issue. To travel overseas needs approval by top management. I dare say on one occasion that with less restrictions, the company could had saved X. Not to talk about these studies...
One should bear in mind that Statoil being Norways largest company can't pay as much as foreign oil companies thus pays less because it would raise the average pay level in Norway. All very understandable. With this backdrop it will be less interesting to stay by the company when one have enough knowledge to seek better opportunities elsewhere.

Advice to Management

Start listening to individuals one by one over a coffee or something, and not from middle/top management.

Other Employee Reviews for Statoil

  1. Helpful (1)

    "Solid ship headed into rougher weather"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Stavanger (Norway)
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Stavanger (Norway)
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Statoil full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Fantastic work/life balance, and company of high ethical integrity. CEO Lund is smart and sincere man with conservative values tempered by Scandinavian sense of humanity. Being a majority state owned company in social democratic Norway has contributed to a generous cushion of labour rights and entitlements. Statoil has developed leading world-class technologies and uses them both to optimize hydrocarbon recovery and find socially and environmentally responsible solutions to adverse effects of oil and gas production.

    Cons

    Statoil is a company in transition, like most other oil majors in one way or another. Norway and Statoil's generosity is often taken for granted by Norwegian employees. The company is wrought with cumbersome bureaucracy and too many internal stakeholders getting in the way of needed greater expediency. Management trying to streamline processes and trim fat to maintain global competitive edge and economic viability in face of tighter margins, but they frequently come across as blunt, callous and clumsy to Norwegian workforce, subsequently diminishing morale and loyalty. The company's turn away from developing renewable energy since the merger with Hydro in 2007 has disappointed many employees. Many also question the ethics of Statoil's investments in oil sands and shale gas and would at least like to see us take the lead in mitigating the environmental and social downsides of those pursuits. The decision and probable necessity to expand internationally is unfortunately contributing to Statoil losing its soul and becoming like many other mega multinational oil companies.

    Advice to Management

    Insist on cutting costs through even greater expediency. Don't waste time and resources on appeasing the consensus and likewise don't let clueless managerial tyrants waste the time, resources and creative energy of individuals and teams by insisting on tiresome non-necessities. Despite company's efforts to streamline processes, many still don't get it.


  2. Helpful (1)

    "Slow-paced, but very friendly environment...place to take some rest and relax"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Stavanger (Norway)
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Stavanger (Norway)
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Statoil full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Medium pay, but very short hours and managers are very flexible when it comes to holidays or simply long weekends. All business travel times outside of working hours is paid as extra time.
    The environment at work is very nice and friendly...Flowers, cakes, waffles, yoga, good gym...

    Cons

    A lot of old employees - result, very slow pace business environment, most of them, unfortunately, simply wait to retire and get that super pension. No challenge in daily activities. When promoting to new or expatriate positions managers are somewhat favourable to norwegians - which is an understandable issue, but when they hire international people they emphasize that opportunities are equal. Norwegian language recently became an issue, this is no longer real international company - you are told very straightforward that they want you to speak Norwegian - no proper training is provided though. And it requires some efforts to reach some level of proficiency in it...and you are really not sure what to do with it later on in your life...unless you plan to relocate to a country of "perma" autumn/winter...

    Advice to Management

    Instead of cutting costs on fruits try to stimulate people to save money for the company and not always being contractor friendly...it is harder to do but will save you much more

There are newer employer reviews for Statoil
There are newer employer reviews for Statoil

See Most Recent

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