TheStreet - Exciting time to be at TheStreet | Glassdoor
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There are newer employer reviews for TheStreet

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Helpful (1)

"Exciting time to be at TheStreet"

Star Star Star Star Star
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
Recommends
Positive Outlook
Approves of CEO

I have been working at TheStreet full-time (More than a year)

Pros

The digital media landscape is rapidly changing and TheStreet is a great place to be part of an exciting transition to financial information distribution via social media. It's a well-funded organization and has started to make investments in new business initiatives under the new management team. Great brand to build on.

Cons

Dealing with some of the past questionable business decisions can be a challenge and a distraction to growing the business.

Advice to Management

Continue to invest in the quality of the products and expand the breadth of their reach.

Other Employee Reviews for TheStreet

  1. Helpful (3)

    "Bad upper management still"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at TheStreet full-time

    Pros

    If you like the idea of no personal life and has the possibility of working overnight then this is the company for you.

    Cons

    Don't expect to be recognized for the hard work you do. Upper management has unrealistic expectations and project deadlines. They don't really care about employee's well being or career growth.

    Advice to Management

    Be real and listen to your employees. Care more about the people.


  2. Helpful (5)

    "Work in progress as a financial news company and employer/mentor of journalists."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Journalist
    Current Employee - Journalist
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at TheStreet full-time

    Pros

    1. TheStreet is an OK place for a young reporter interested in financial journalism and in getting a chance to develop a portfolio of clips for a career in business news. There may also be opportunities for mid-level editors interested in working with small teams of reporters or freelance contributors to have some autonomy in overseeing a beat or content section. It's less clear whether it's a place to stay for too long, or frankly, where one can be fairly certain the job will exist for long.

    3. There is a lot of freedom to pursue topics of interest within business/stock market reporting, and report in a variety of formats -- breaking news, news analysis, opinion, blogging, video reporting. Also autonomy to structure your own reporting day.

    4. The newsroom does not have a backbreaking atmosphere which will keep you up at 3 am with stress thinking about the next morning or last story filed, though if you are a Type A go-getter, you can make your own opportunity to go full throttle.

    5. TheStreet stories will turn up in the main search engines (Yahoo, Google) get picked up by well known partners (CNBC), and the company has an active management effort to increase exposure for its content.

    6. Newsroom staff is inclusive and supportive. The relatively small in-house reporting team is solid, focused, supportive of colleagues and generally good eggs in what can be a world of financial journalism often ripe with petty jealousies and poor office camaraderie.

    Cons

    1. Part of the editorial freedom and camaraderie comes as a result of some negatives, lots of layoffs leaving too few editors to provide training and mentoring; a top layer of editorial management that often seems (whether intentionally or not) disinterested in the "on the ground" reporters ( e.g. the top editor for the NY newsroom isn't even located in NY); a growing reliance on freelance contributors that makes the newsroom strategy unclear longer-term; a business model that is broken (but whose model isn't broken in online journalism?).

    The broken model has led to constant changes in strategy that can be frustrating for journalists, and so the journalists who are left tend to stick together, sort of like an island within a company that doesn't pay them much mind (not a good thing for journalists to feel at a company in the journalism business). While newsroom staff does have each others' back, TheStreet stands out as a company in a negative sense for there being very little social interaction among staff outside of office.

    2. There have been so many layoffs and leavings in the newsroom over the past few years the freelance contributors to the site now far outweigh the actual in-house staff. The company boasts an editorial team of 180 people in press releases, but the actual newsroom is approx. a dozen people (and remember, the top editor for our NY newsroom isn't even located in NY). There has been a bit of frustration among newsroom staff due to all the changes and a sense of uncertainty about the future does crop up from time to time, though doesn't have to interfere with getting the job done on a daily basis or developing your skills and portfolio.

    3. After a recent change in the CEO office, the first thing the new CEO had handed out to us was a photocopy of a primer on using Google+. As if using Google + would change everything for us as journalists and for the company (and as if pointing out Google + to us was telling us something we didn't already know). This after years of being judged primarily on how many page hits our stories received. Too much reliance on quick fixes ie no real fix.

    4. The company recently brought in a new editor-in-chief, who seems to be a nice person, knowledgeable, approachable and interested in listening to newsroom staff (when he has the time): The company has positioned him more as an executive in the newsroom than an actual editor. While this may make sense for an editor-in-chief at a large news organization, it doesn't do much for the small in-house newsroom staff at TheStreet (especially when the top in-house editor below the EIC isn't even in NY). Though our previous editor-in-chief was probably too hands on, so pick your poison...

    5. Human Resources seems better at misusing and losing people than bringing in talent to support existing newsroom staff. If anything, HR does more (sometimes by doing nothing) to demoralize journalists than provide any incentives for us to feel like we are top priority for the company. HR's idea of supporting staff/reaching out to staff often is no more than having some cupcakes delivered to office every so often, or having monthly birthday cakes for all the employees with a birthday that month. It's like a bad office parody of what HR should be doing, and yet, they don't seem to realize it.

    6. Compensation and benefits are mediocre at best, but for a company that loses money quarter after quarter, that shouldn't be surprising. Though it can be frustrating watching all of the thousands of dollars going out the door weekly in catered breakfasts and lunches for management conference room events, or hearing stories about freelancers getting paid a lot more than in-house staff, or when FedEx delivers the package of iPads for each member of the board of directors, all this while newsroom salaries barely budge and bonuses, if any, have been relatively small. The company was once, not that many years ago, more generous in benefits and could be again if its finances improve, but that is a big "if."

    7. Please don't think as a reporter at TheStreet Jim Cramer will know who you are. I have been with the company for several years and we just had our first-ever meeting between Cramer and the editorial team, most of whom he did not know by name. If you are one of the video reporters that he does interviews you will have a rapport, but otherwise, it's possible to work at TheStreet for years without ever exchanging a hello with Mr. Mad Money. You shouldn't care about that as a journalist, but if you do care, don't be disappointed later.

    Advice to Management

    Management and hr can often be tone deaf to fact that it's a news business, not just a generic corporation that has to make money somehow (and fast). The broken business model, unclear strategy to improve company profitability, define itself as a viable and respected news source, and increase employee satisfaction, are all related, yet it's often difficult to see how management is aware all of these things are related beyond token gestures.

    The company has bounced around from one strategy to the next in trying to increase exposure, and sometimes it feels more like there is an "air of desperation" about being heard in the hyper competitive online news space than there is an effective and viable long-term strategy.

    Sometimes the editorial content seems a little bit too shrill as a result (which is a well-traveled complaint about the company). Also, it's unclear where exactly within financial journalism the company will/can make its mark. It can't (and never has been able to) compete with the wires on breaking news. It (sort of) wants to be and has always been like Motley Fool/Seeking Alpha, and (sort of) wants to be a blog and "the loudest person in the room", and meanwhile be a personal finance site and affluent investor/consumer site. Being really good at one thing might be better if that one thing could be identified.

    In terms of management strategy, sometimes it seems like management is less interested in walking the walk of promoting quality journalism than in seeing its brand featured on CNBC or some other network, as if just getting 30 seconds as a talking head in a CNBC segment or to the top of the search results for a day will rescue a broken business model. That and "popularity contests" like it are a viable part of a strategy, but far from a comprehensive strategy that will ensure the company is around for the long haul.

There are newer employer reviews for TheStreet
There are newer employer reviews for TheStreet

See Most Recent

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