UC Riverside - Excellent Place to Work | Glassdoor
There are newer employer reviews for UC Riverside
There are newer employer reviews for UC Riverside

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"Excellent Place to Work"

StarStarStarStarStar
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
Recommends
Neutral Outlook
No opinion of CEO

I worked at UC Riverside part-time

Pros

Great people to work with.
On campus made it close to school

Cons

Unpredictable scheduling changes made it stressful

Other Employee Reviews for UC Riverside

  1. "Graduate Student Teaching Assistant"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at UC Riverside full-time

    Pros

    Opportunities to work with a diverse group of students.

    Cons

    Some courses are unorganized, and the pay doesn't compensate for the amount of work put in.


  2. "Good mission goals as an ethic studies research center, but severely poor management"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Intern - Anonymous Intern
    Former Intern - Anonymous Intern
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at UC Riverside as an intern

    Pros

    As a small research facility, it's pretty easy to get a position as a student intern here. The tasks were pretty simple ones like compiling files to scan, answering phone calls and more. At first, it seems that it would be simple job since you can schedule your own hours around your class schedule.

    Cons

    The researcher, Carol Park, who's in charge of running the research facility really needed a personal assistant. She tried to rely on delegating tasks to student interns and using them to run the research center. While she'd be there in the afternoons after about 1pm or 2pm, she wouldn't be there in the mornings when Professor Edward Chang would need her especially.

    Some ways that Park would rely heavily on the student interns is through how she would forward emails during students' holiday breaks, like Winter break, and expect them to organize them. While employees aren't prohibited from sending work-related emails, this was definitely overtime work. Not only did those emails have files while needed to be uploaded and backed up onto the research center's system, these files were set to expire within the next day or two. This meant that interns would have to download these files and save them onto their computer - these files could take anywhere from half an hour to two hours to download because they were huge interview clips too sometimes. Of course they also would have to keep these files on their computers for almost a month until they could back them up onto the center's system.

    Park really doesn't know how to manage interns very well and train them. Student interns often-times have this position as their first job. So by her assuming that these interns will know what problems there are, she's assuming that these interns will know what's wrong. Some may even be fresh high school graduates. When I interviewed for this position, it was not clarified to me that they wanted me to be their full-time secretary essentially. Which was what it felt like since they were willing to pay interns up until the full 19 hours that UC Riverside allows for student interns. One red flag was when she had told another intern to tell me about an event. Which I had of course heard from the other intern but they had at that not told anything further than that it was coming up. She assumed that the interns would remember to tell others about full details - a job task which should fall onto an assistant manager or lead, not a random intern who's just as busy with school like the other intern. This is why managers exist in the first place.

    Towards the end when we had a meeting and I had to tell her that I don't think that I'm meeting her expectations and how this position was now cutting into my academics, she even said something along these lines: "You told me that everything was fine. So I assumed you got everything under control despite other interns telling me about you." So instead of having things like quarterly reviews, she decided to wait almost an entire year to tell me what was up. How is someone, especially a student, supposed to know that what they're doing is wrong if no one tells them about it? This created unnecessary tension, stress and angst since she knew that there was a problem but instead ignored it, because it was too hard for her to put into words as to why there was a problem.

    Most of all, Park had a lot of outside obligations like acting as a karate instructor in the evenings and doing freelance copyediting/writing gigs. That sounds great on paper since that means she should be good at multi-tasking. But all of these experiences doesn't mean that she understands how to be a good manager, let alone boss in charge of student interns. Interns need ample training - even specific training days. But nope - she delegated this task to other interns solely and assumed that those interns would know how to properly train new interns. Further evidence of this poor management was how disorganized the office space was. Nobody could say for certain where things like film permission forms were located.

    There was no main lead or assistant manager to ensure that interns adhered to their schedule or to maintain the social media website and keep a running catalog of where the money orders were. The very fact that money orders for books didn't have a check-out system was one worrisome issue. The check receipts would be kept in a locked drawer of course - but there wouldn't be a list where a person would sign their name and date it when they took those receipts or money. Simple organization like this should not be left to multiple interns solely.

    Advice to Management

    Hire a full-time manager or assistant manager. Don't rely on the interns to delegate themselves and to understand what to do, especially if you're too busy to do proper management.

There are newer employer reviews for UC Riverside
There are newer employer reviews for UC Riverside

See Most Recent

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